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Tyger

4.1 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews

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Tyger
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Audio CD, 1987
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Vinyl, Import, 1987
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Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Original Release Date: 1987
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Caroline
  • ASIN: B000EEM9BU
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #600,554 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Steve Benner VINE VOICE on June 2, 2008
Format: Audio CD
In 1978, Tangerine Dream's first major attempt at introducing vocals into their music (with the album "Cyclone") met with fairly dismal failure. Nine years and two changes of personnel later, the band made a second attempt with "Tyger". This album's title comes from its opening track, which is a setting of William Blake's poem "The Tyger". Others of Blake's allegorical and prophetic writings appear throughout the album. The track 'London' features not only "LONDON" (from his "Songs of Experience") but also mixes in the prefacing stanza from "A Little GIRL Lost" and the whole of "THE FLY" from the same collection, plus half-a-dozen lines (46-51) from "America: A Prophecy" (1793). Similarly, 'Smile' sets the first poem from Blake's so-called "Pickering" manuscript, written about 1803.

The vocalist throughout is guest R&B star, Jocelyn Bernadette Smith, who, it must be said, has a very powerful and beautiful singing voice, and is a joy to listen to. While she does quite a good job of difficult stuff, here, I find these tracks a little marred by her seeming lack of understanding of just what she is singing about at times. (She certainly doesn't know how to pronounce "Thames", for instance.) None the less, with these works, Tangerine Dream demonstrate that they are well able to integrate the singing voice into their own particular sound world.

Froese was no doubt drawn to Blake's mysterious and mystical works through his own interest in Surrealism - a movement that has often drawn heavily on Blake for its inspiration. Perhaps even, he was responding to the direct plea made in Blake's "Milton: A Prophecy": "Rouze up, O Young Men of the New Age!
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Format: Audio CD
This never was one of Tadream's more popular releases and I actually can appreciate why. You can't dance to it, you can't really "meditate" to it (in the traditional sense) it's not a head-trip like their earlier stuff, maybe it IS a bit hokey(particularly "Alchemy of the Heart"), the eubonic flavored female vocals may not have been the best choice for translation, and probably most people just plain don't dig William Blake all that much. The vocalist in particular,whose name I forget(forgive me)has a rich, powerful voice, but a Lorenna McKinnet sound would have been much better suited than the Whitney Houston approach used here.
Reguardless, I recommend TYGER to folks looking for something unique. It was the last TD studio album with the great Christopher Franke(TD's sound was never the same for me afterwards). The intro the the song "Smile", most likely Franke's baby, is classic TD. (But then that lady tries to sing barratone for a few words, it sounds forced.)
The title track works best in mergeing the vocals with the text with music, overall. The album concludes with "21st Century Common Man" parts one and two, and while they feel out of place with the rest of the album, they have an energy that's fun.( It's GREAT fun listening to those tracks while takeing a nocturnal highway drive. Preferrably with a convertable.)
Not quite vintage TD, but the last of what I would call from their "classic" years. ( 71-87 )
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Format: Audio CD
Edgar Froese, Paul Haslinger and early group member Chris Franke are joined by singer Jocelyn Bernadette Smith for this album, which is somewhat of a departure from the pattern set by their three previous releases, "Optical Race", "Lily on the Beach" and "Melrose". Many of the tracks revolve around the sung and narrated poems of William Blake (1757-1827). Smith performs "The Tyger" (as in: "Tyger, Tyger, burning bright / In the forests of the night..."), "London", "The Fly", "The Smile" and an exerpt from "America". While I normally prefer instrumental music to that with lyrics, Blake's surreal, often brooding poetry is a good match for Tangerine Dream's compositions, and is certainly more thought-provoking than many modern lyrics (which generally wallow in boring, self-indulgent states ranging from lovelorn to just plain horny, crying much but saying little). Most of the run-time of this album, however, remains instrumental, and the music is similar to the other work of Tangerine Dream--fervent, provocative and ever-changing with a focus on electronic keyboards. My favorite track on "Tyger" is the third one, "Alchemy of the Heart", whose striking beginning makes an excellent background against which to teach a student the basics of musical improvisation. A timid beginner could simply play, hold and repeat a "D" for the entire first section, listening to how that one note continues to fit in with the changing chordal structure. Slightly more adventurous, the player could then experiment by moving at will from note to note of the d minor chord (D-F-A), all of which still fit in with what Tangerine Dream is doing.Read more ›
1 Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Audio CD
In 1978, Tangerine Dream's first major attempt at introducing vocals into their music (with the album "Cyclone") met with fairly dismal failure. Nine years and two changes of personnel later, the band made a second attempt with "Tyger". This album's title comes from its opening track, which is a setting of William Blake's poem "The Tyger". Others of Blake's allegorical and prophetic writings appear throughout the album. The track 'London' features not only "LONDON" (from his "Songs of Experience") but also mixes in the prefacing stanza from "A Little GIRL Lost" and the whole of "THE FLY" from the same collection, plus half-a-dozen lines (46-51) from "America: A Prophecy" (1793). Similarly, 'Smile' sets the first poem from Blake's so-called "Pickering" manuscript, written about 1803.
The vocalist throughout is guest R&B star, Jocelyn Bernadette Smith, who, it must be said, has a very powerful and beautiful singing voice, and is a joy to listen to. While she does quite a good job of difficult stuff, here, I find these tracks a little marred by her seeming lack of understanding of just what she is singing about at times. (She certainly doesn't know how to pronounce "Thames", for instance.) None the less, with these works, Tangerine Dream demonstrate that they are well able to integrate the singing voice into their own particular sound world.
Froese was no doubt drawn to Blake's mysterious and mystical works through his own interest in Surrealism - a movement that has often drawn heavily on Blake for its inspiration. Perhaps even, he was responding to the direct plea made in Blake's "Milton: A Prophecy": "Rouze up, O Young Men of the New Age!
Read more ›
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