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Typee by [Melville, Herman]
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Typee Kindle Edition

4.2 out of 5 stars 44 customer reviews

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Length: 261 pages Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled Page Flip: Enabled

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Editorial Reviews

Review


"Attractive editions, clear type, good introductions and annotations."--Barbara Packer, UCLA


"An excellend edition. Blair's deeply informed introduction and notes lend contextual substance necessary to an historically aware appreciation of Typee."--Lawrence Howe, Roosevelt University


"Ideal teaching edition because of the splendid notes, bibliographies and chronologies." --Robert Regan, University of Pennsylvania


About the Author

<DIV>

Herman Melville was born in August 1, 1819, in New York City, the son of a merchant. Only twelve when his father died bankrupt, young Herman tried work as a bank clerk, as a cabin-boy on a trip to Liverpool, and as an elementary schoolteacher, before shipping in January 1841 on the whaler Acushnet, bound for the Pacific. Deserting ship the following year in the Marquesas, he made his way to Tahiti and Honolulu, returning as ordinary seaman on the frigate United States to Boston, where he was discharged in October 1844. Books based on these adventures won him immediate success. By 1850 he was married, had acquired a farm near Pittsfield, Massachussetts (where he was the impetuous friend and neighbor of Nathaniel Hawthorne), and was hard at work on his masterpiece Moby-Dick.

Literary success soon faded; his complexity increasingly alienated readers. After a visit to the Holy Land in January 1857, he turned from writing prose fiction to poetry. In 1863, during the Civil War, he moved back to New York City, where from 1866-1885 he was a deputy inspector in the Custom House, and where, in 1891, he died. A draft of a final prose work, Billy Budd, Sailor, was left unfinished and uncollated, packed tidily away by his widow, where it remained until its rediscovery and publication in 1924.

</div>

Product Details

  • File Size: 730 KB
  • Print Length: 261 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publication Date: May 12, 2012
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0082UO1D2
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #18,377 Free in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Free in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I read Typee some time ago. It was one of Herman Melville's early works. It tells a somewhat true story of his travels as a sailor. In this story he abandons his ship and slips onto an unknown island. Little did he know that it was full of cannibals! There was one tribe that was particularly aggressive that he tried to avoid, only to wind up in their village. He gives some good first hand accounts of primitive natives from the South Pacific region of the early 1800's. He never understood their psychology, but was able to describe the natives in terms of his observations. He felt like he was a prisoner on the island and with some great difficulty was eventually able to escape by finding another ship that would take him back to his civilization. If you are interested in anthropology you will find this book very fascinating. His writing style is crisp and moves along in a way that makes the book hard to put down.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I first read this book when I was in my teens and so began my dream to someday go sailing in the South Seas and try to capture some of the adventure so well described by Herman Melville. When I grew up and became a profesional photographer and film maker, I had the chance to both sail and visit some of the islands, but unfortunately Herman's world and the Typee Valley is all but a memory. None the less, I decided to read Typee again after so many years to see if it still inspired me and I found that it still invokes a wonderful feeling of a world we wish would still exist. Melville has a unique style of writing, which I miss in most of today's writing; he tell the story in a way that I almost feel I am there with him. It's a wonderful book that will never age and I highly recommended for those that like adventure and want to learn about a now lost paradise.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Very difficult reading because of the stilted, archaic narrative. The description of the Typee life style became boring. The story of Toby's fate was disconnected.

Only the question of his escape and Toby's fate kept me reading.
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By Joel Marks on February 4, 2013
Format: Paperback
I just want to express my appreciation of a book that is joy incarnated. I join the ranks of the multitudes who will forever wonder how much of its account is true. It would be so nice to believe that it is wholly true. But however true or false, the book leaves one (or me, anyway) with, at the very least, the most pleasant of dreams. The young Melville is the captive guest of the natives of a tropical isle, where life is forever lazy and paradisic. There are so many scenes that are memorable for both the attractiveness of their content and the author's tolerant and amused way of narrating them. In addition, beneath the charm and the humor runs a thread of menace. What a delightful mix for the reader! This book is either for light reading or for profound reveries about human social possibilities. Above all: Enjoy it.

Note: I found Melville's follow-up book, Omoo, to be a total bore and terribly written. Hard to believe it was the same author.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This an excellent novel, set in the South Seas about a sailor who deserts his whaling ship and winds up living among the indigenous population of an island with a tribe called the Typee. They are feared by the whites as fierce cannibals, but, as his sojourn among them unfolds, he finds that the truth is very different. I was fascinated with this depiction of primitive communism. Hardly a utopia however. For example, women are not allowed in canoes under pain of death except sometimes. Melville paints a subtle, shaded view of the Typee and, of course, the writing is first class. Highly recommended.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is such a terrific epic tale, and so it became a gift to a Melville lover. What a fantastic story--white knuckle reading--and it falls into the genre of Melville's triple strategy: 1) his own experience throughout the world as a merchant marine, 2) his having stolen the stories and wild sea-faring exploits of many of his fellow mariners, and 3) Melville's great and rich imagination. All three of these combine with some of the most remarkable storytelling and language ever to be read.

This is a classic, a thrill to read. This book also documents the vicious and violent flogging that merchant marines endured at the hands of the captain--who was a law unto himself on the high seas. Sometimes, a captious captain would order flogging for the most minor offenses. Melville draws a shocking picture of what flogging really meant--shock, maiming, and death--especially for the younger sailors. Often, as Melville tells, older sailors took the flogging for the infractions of the younger sailors to spare them death. Because of THIS book, the horrors told of what cruel captains often perpetrated at sea, Maritime Law was changed to protect all sailors, so this book actually changed international law upon the seas. It's a riveting tale of how he and his buddy escaped from the ship in the land of the Fiji islands, only to survive life among cannibals. Melville became vastly famous for this tale, immediately known as "The Man Who Had Lived Among Cannibals." Extraordinary book.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The writing style of the 19th century may put people off, but this book is definitely worth reading. It gives a first-hand account of how an isolated people lived, their customs, their food their religion and other details of the life of a Polynesian people in the early 18th century. Melville's writing style is full of dry humor, which makes the book more light-hearted than would be expected of a story of a man held as something of a prisoner by a foreign people. Although their is a lot of interesting detail of the way of life of one tribe on the island of Nukuheva, there are several questions that Melville could not answer; the most important of which was why the Typee people kept him as a virtual prisoner, while, at the same time, treating him as an honored guest.
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