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Ulysses (Illustrated) by [Joyce, James]
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Ulysses (Illustrated) Kindle Edition

3.8 out of 5 stars 35 customer reviews

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Kindle, August 27, 2014
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Length: 442 pages Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled Page Flip: Enabled
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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Ulysses has been labeled dirty, blasphemous, and unreadable. In a famous 1933 court decision, Judge John M. Woolsey declared it an emetic book--although he found it sufficiently unobscene to allow its importation into the United States--and Virginia Woolf was moved to decry James Joyce's "cloacal obsession." None of these adjectives, however, do the slightest justice to the novel. To this day it remains the modernist masterpiece, in which the author takes both Celtic lyricism and vulgarity to splendid extremes. It is funny, sorrowful, and even (in a close-focus sort of way) suspenseful. And despite the exegetical industry that has sprung up in the last 75 years, Ulysses is also a compulsively readable book. Even the verbal vaudeville of the final chapters can be navigated with relative ease, as long as you're willing to be buffeted, tickled, challenged, and (occasionally) vexed by Joyce's sheer command of the English language.

Among other things, a novel is simply a long story, and the first question about any story is: What happens?. In the case of Ulysses, the answer might be Everything. William Blake, one of literature's sublime myopics, saw the universe in a grain of sand. Joyce saw it in Dublin, Ireland, on June 16, 1904, a day distinguished by its utter normality. Two characters, Stephen Dedalus and Leopold Bloom, go about their separate business, crossing paths with a gallery of indelible Dubliners. We watch them teach, eat, stroll the streets, argue, and (in Bloom's case) masturbate. And thanks to the book's stream-of-consciousness technique--which suggests no mere stream but an impossibly deep, swift-running river--we're privy to their thoughts, emotions, and memories. The result? Almost every variety of human experience is crammed into the accordian folds of a single day, which makes Ulysses not just an experimental work but the very last word in realism.

Both characters add their glorious intonations to the music of Joyce's prose. Dedalus's accent--that of a freelance aesthetician, who dabbles here and there in what we might call Early Yeats Lite--will be familiar to readers of Portrait of an Artist As a Young Man. But Bloom's wistful sensualism (and naive curiosity) is something else entirely. Seen through his eyes, a rundown corner of a Dublin graveyard is a figure for hope and hopelessness, mortality and dogged survival: "Mr Bloom walked unheeded along his grove by saddened angels, crosses, broken pillars, family vaults, stone hopes praying with upcast eyes, old Ireland's hearts and hands. More sensible to spend the money on some charity for the living. Pray for the repose of the soul of. Does anybody really?" --James Marcus

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Frank and Malachy McCourt and 13 Irish actors bring Joyce's short stories to life in this well-produced audiobook. None of the readers employ a thick accent in the narrative portions, but for dialogue they let their imitative talents shine and their Irish lilts bloom. Brendan Coyle and Charles Keating, reading "A Little Cloud" and "Grace" respectively, give such wonderful expression to the idiosyncrasies of every individual voice that the listener is never confused even when numerous men are talking. Joyce wrote only sparingly in actual dialect, but most of the readers interpret his intentions freely and successfully. Fionnula Flanagan is perfect reading "A Mother," her voice shifting easily between prim and proper tones and fiery indignation punctuated with little sighs. It helps that Joyce's writing is so masterful that when Flanagan and the two other actresses read the three stories that revolve around women, their words sound utterly natural. Not all the performances are on the same level—Stephen Rea's cold, somber voice is apt for the meditative beginning and ending sections of the collection's most famous story, "The Dead," but too flat for the central description of a lively party. This audiobook creates the atmosphere of a fireside storytelling session that will hold any listener in rapt attention. (May)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Product Details

  • File Size: 4213 KB
  • Print Length: 442 pages
  • Publication Date: August 27, 2014
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00E6U3VB0
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #240,070 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Dean T. Sinclair on March 7, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is the more complete edition to which I refer in my review of the free Kindle version of Ulysses. Originally this came to me as claiming to be Unabridged (Annotated) but now it says unabridged (illustrated). Go figure. I didn't see any annotations when I started reading it, and I have also seen no illustrations. Still, this has the internal poetry, doggerel, etc. that the the free edition has excised.

Update: This is now listed as Ulysses (Annotated Edition) for $1.99.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Ulysses is great... James Joyce is Great... The quality of the paper used and the cardboard for the covers well it gives you a lot to think... Well not that much cause is a Paperback... If you want this book for a travel... if you a are a punk against the struggles of nature and streets... If you enjoy reading in parks and alleways... If you dont have the time of taking too much care for books this edition is for you! If you want a collectible Ulysses for your studio avoid this... The particular issue is that this book was printed in IRELAND and has illustrations... Very lovely illutrations... The type of the letter is great big enjoyable read... Even if in some pages like the ink kind of sparse on the pages (very few pages) the book is all readable... Its a great book and a great edition... Im not a Joyceanian so i dont really know if this is the best review... But yes its a bad quality paper edition for sure... If you see a book printed in Spain you know what i mean... Not the best quality paper but a good edition ... The corners will get bend soon.... I dont know if the ink is the cause of the stains... I would call this the Ulysses combat edition to initiate yourself in this wonderful book... A good edition if you are thinking to go to a camping or to the beachs...

There is something romating about this issue anyway... it was printed in IRELAND ...
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is not an easy book, but it rewards you with a magnificent tour de force of literature. I found it best to read this with a set of lectures on the book from "Great Courses" and at times, to use WhisperSync to have it read to me while I read along. As I say, it isn't easy or obvious, but it is brilliant, lyrical, extraordinary, challenging and wonderful. Arguably the best novel I've ever read.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Joyce was 40 yrs old when Ulysses was published, it is a day in the life of a husband and father of Joyce's age (at publication). Joyce loved Dublin and Ireland and though the book was written on the European continent - he wanted to memorialize his birth home (Ireland). The framework of Ulysses is Homer's Odyssey - The Roman Ulysses: 1 Telemachus, 2 Nestor, 3 Proteus, 4 Calypso, 5 Lotus Eaters, 6 Hades, 7 Aeolus, 8 Lestrygonians, 9 Scylla And Charybdis, 10 Wandering Rocks, 11 Sirens, 12 Cyclops, 13 Nausicca, 14 Oxen Of The Sun, 15 Circe, 16 Eumaeus, 17 Ithaca, and 18 Penelope.

Ulysses is the tale of a Modern-day Odysseus, Leopold Bloom in his personal existential/sexual quest. The conclusion of this quest is the quintessential affirmation of humanity, the fundamental family unit - the father, mother, son, and daughter. Like Odysseus, absent from Penelope, traveling the world, for many long years, Leopold Bloom is also absent from his Penelope (in Dublin). Like a traveler (Odysseus), Bloom is sexually absent (abstinent) from Molly “10 years, 5 months and 18 days” (736). Unlike Odysseus, the obstacles Bloom faces are psychological (modern) - internal travails instead of Odysseus' external travails. Bloom's only son’s death has become a psychological barrier; as Molly reflects: “we were never the same since” (778). Yet Bloom is optimistic throughout the work - in regard to the possibility of another child, again Molly: ”Ill give him one more chance” (780). Affirmatively (as we grow to know Molly) we find she has given and is willing to continue to give Bloom “one more chance”. Through the course of the (Dublin) day, Bloom experiences “deep frustration, humiliation, fear, punishment and catharsis” (Herring, p.74).
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is considered the greatest novel of it's time. It is very complex and Mr Joyce has made countless references to other great works, authors and styles of writing. I now know the novel Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace is based on this novel and writing style. I love and hate this book at the same time. It is not an easy read or listen (I listen as I read). The hardest part for me is I know, as with the Bible, I lack the background knowledge of the time period to fully appreciate this novel. Context, time period and word usage are all giving me fits. This novel has lead me to get and soon read the writers whose styles and works Mr Joyce eludes to throughout the book.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Is this extraordinary novel by James Joyce the greatest novel of the 20th Century (as many polls have indicated and many reviewers claimed)? Or is it, as some critics say, all style without substance, all sizzle without any steak? Make up your own mind by reading this well formatted and beautifully illustrated edition. I think it's worth the trouble (even though, I must confess, I sometimes find Joyce difficult reading) just to find and relish phrases like the one quoted by another reviewer (Lecancan): "The sea, the snotgreen sea, the scrotumtightening sea."

Beat that!
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