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The Unconscious God Mass Market Paperback – March, 1985

4.4 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

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Mass Market Paperback, March, 1985
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Text: English, German (translation) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 10 pages
  • Publisher: Pocket Books (Mm) (March 1985)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671547283
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671547288
  • Product Dimensions: 6.2 x 4 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #585,006 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Top Customer Reviews

By Frank on February 3, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It is amazing that this man is not read with the same respect as Jung or Freud. His viewpoint is a view from a very unique point that needs to be considered if not revered by everyone.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I liked this book even more that "Man's Search for Meaning." Its incredible that this was published in 1946, months after Frankl was liberated from a concentration camp. His writing is lucid and I think poignant where he elucidates the relationship between psychiatry and theology. There are some points I disagree with: I think he stresses that the divine, or numinous, bears no relation to the material and factual. I would argue that our sense of the divine, as well as conscience, are both products of the connections between our minds and our bodies and between individuals and their social surroundings. Interestingly, Frankl uses the example of the human navel, which symbolizes the connection between mother and child as a metaphor of transcendence, but fails to see in his use of this metaphor a potential reference to the actual sense of the numinous, as well as to conscience. Although his writing is open enough to allow for this possibility, he stops short of examining the full significance of the connection to the mother, the intrauterine environment in which consciousness first develops a sense of itself. There is a lot more to be said about this book and Frankl's contributions to our understanding of human behavior. In "Entheogens, Society & Law: Towards a Politics of Consciousness, Autonomy and Responsibility" Daniel Waterman and Casey William Hardison have explored the notion of response-ability implicit in this work in detail. See: http://www.amazon.com/dp/190864561X
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I wish I had understood this work better. It is an abstract essay and does not in any way compare to Frankl's remarkable and great work on his experience in concentration camps 'Man's Search for Meaning'. Nonetheless he does here once again stress the importance of freedom and personal decision. He does underline the power of the human being to decide on the attitude he will take to a most important subject. He does not see theological experience as being the result of instinct or drive and he faults Jung and Freud for doing such. Frankl is always concerned about the dignity of the human being, of finding value and meaning in life, on deciding on the way to this. In this sense this work is in conjunction with the ideas he is most known for, and the contribution he has made to humanity.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
It's a book written by sciencist for sciencists about humanity and God, but even ordinary folks can get it meaning. Great stuff.
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