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University Physics Plus Modern Physics Plus MasteringPhysics with eText -- Access Card Package (13th Edition) 13th Edition

4.1 out of 5 stars 143 customer reviews
Textbook & Access Code
ISBN-13: 978-0321675460
ISBN-10: 0321675460
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Hugh D. Young is Emeritus Professor of Physics at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA. He attended Carnegie Mellon for both undergraduate and graduate study and earned his Ph.D. in fundamental particle theory under the direction of the late Richard Cutkosky. He joined the faculty of Carnegie Mellon in 1956 and has also spent two years as a Visiting Professor at the University of California at Berkeley.

 

Professor Young’s career has centered entirely on undergraduate education. He has written several undergraduate-level textbooks, and in 1973 he became a co-author with Francis Sears and Mark Zemansky for their well-known introductory texts. With their deaths, he assumed full responsibility for new editions of these books until joined by Prof. Freedman for University Physics.

 

Professor Young is an enthusiastic skier, climber, and hiker. He also served for several years as Associate Organist at St. Paul’s Cathedral in Pittsburgh, and has played numerous organ recitals in the Pittsburgh area. Prof. Young and his wife Alice usually travel extensively in the summer, especially in Europe and in the desert canyon country of southern Utah.

 

Roger A. Freedman is a Lecturer in Physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Dr. Freedman was an undergraduate at the University of California campuses in San Diego and Los Angeles, and did his doctoral research in nuclear theory at Stanford University under the direction of Professor J. Dirk Walecka. He came to UCSB in 1981 after three years teaching and doing research at the University of Washington.

 

At UCSB, Dr. Freedman has taught in both the Department of Physics and the College of Creative Studies, a branch of the university intended for highly gifted and motivated undergraduates. He has published research in nuclear physics, elementary particle physics, and laser physics. In recent years, he has helped to develop computer-based tools for learning introductory physics and astronomy. When not in the classroom or slaving over a computer, Dr. Freedman can be found either flying (he holds a commercial pilot’s license) or driving with his wife, Caroline, in their 1960 Nash Metropolitan convertible.

 

A. Lewis Ford is Professor of Physics at Texas A&M University. He received a B.A. from Rice University in 1968 and a Ph.D. in chemical physics from the University of Texas at Austin in 1972. After a one-year postdoc at Harvard University, he joined the Texas A&M physics faculty in 1973 and has been there ever since. Professor Ford’s research area is theoretical atomic physics, with a specialization in atomic collisions. At Texas A&M he has taught a variety of undergraduate and graduate courses, but primarily introductory physics.

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 1632 pages
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley; 13 edition (January 17, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0321675460
  • ISBN-13: 978-0321675460
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 2.2 x 11.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (143 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #273,286 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book has clear explanations, nice pictures and good exercise problems. Interesting applications of physics like swiping of an ATM card and working of touchscreen devices are also mentioned. Exercise problems are categorized by section. Knowledge of differential and integral calculus is recommended, although you can learn a great deal even without it. Overall, this is simply the best introductory physics textbook out there!

The following is the table of contents:

MECHANICS
1. Units, Physical Quantities, and Vectors
2. Motion Along a Straight Line
3. Motion in Two or Three Dimensions
4. Newton's Laws of Motion
5. Applying Newton's Laws
6. Work and Kinetic Energy
7. Potential Energy and Energy Conservation
8. Momentum, Impulse, and Collisions
9. Rotation of Rigid Bodies
10. Dynamics of Rotational Motion
11. Equilibrium and Elasticity
12. Fluid Mechanics
13. Gravitation
14. Periodic Motion

WAVES/ACOUSTICS
15. Mechanical Waves
16. Sound and Hearing

THERMODYNAMICS
17. Temperature and Heat
18. Thermal Properties of Matter
19. The First Law of Thermodynamics
20. The Second Law of Thermodynamics

ELECTROMAGNETISM
21. Electric Charge and Electric Field
22. Gauss's Law
23. Electric Potential
24. Capacitance and Dielectrics
25. Current, Resistance, and Electromotive Force
26. Direct-Current Circuits
27. Magnetic Field and Magnetic Forces
28. Sources of Magnetic Field
29. Electromagnetic Induction
30. Inductance
31. Alternating Current
32. Electromagnetic Waves

OPTICS
33. The Nature and Propagation of Light
34. Geometric Optics and Optical Instruments
35.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The text covers all the material in physics well and at a good pace. The material is not crammed or convoluted and there are plenty of examples to go along with the material. There are problems at the end of each chapter that are separated by section so you can focus on one topic, there are also mixed problems without labels so you can practice for exams, and a few challenge problems that are indeed quite challenging so all you physics geeks out there. In total there are about 100 to 110 problems at the end of every chapter (doesn't include the great examples within every chapter's reading). Reading this text allowed me to get an A in a physics course at Cornell with very little prior knowledge of physics. The only downside is if you buy all the volumes in one book, it is VERY large haha.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is perfect for calculus-based physics, but this particular book in ONE volume is even better because it contains material from both physics 1 & 2.
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By Matt on October 16, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Hello, I am currently a junior in college. I used the 1st third of this book for my Physics I w/ Calculus class and I am currently using the 2nd third of this book for my Physics II w/ Calculus class. I am quite pleased with the book and how well it is written. My only complaint is that the writer does not provide enough detail for certain aspects of the examples... I guess this is where the teacher comes into play. All around though, this has been a great book for my classes. I would probably recommend getting the solutions manual if you can find a good deal on it. That way you will have access to the problems in more detail.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is great. It gives elaborate explanations on why you calculate the way you need to. It gives easy examples and eases into more complex ones. I think it is a great textbook and should be since it is the 12th edition. The publishers just came out with the 13th edition so if you are getting this book for school make sure you don't need the 13th edition.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Very thorough and comprehensive.
Heavy, since it large and has a lot of pages, but the binding is very good.
I actually had the 9th edition, and liked it so much I decided to also get the most recent (13th) edition.
If you're looking for a lot of calculus based problems, this may not be for you, although it doesn't neglect them at all.
Very well edited with no known errors, probably because it's been out for a while.
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Format: Hardcover
This book did an excellent job in explaining every concept. There is not an overwhelming amount of calculus in the text (Calc II is enough for most universities to follow). The book has TONS of examples and problems to work, giving you a shot at mastering. I would recommend... getting a hold of the instructor's manual for the worked end of chapter problems, and one can self-teach with this resource. Great diagrams and derivations.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
All of the mechanics explanations are great but not for the light of heart. Some of the concepts get very hard very fast and make you feel like you missed some sort of a transition step in which you tackle and medium problem before a hard one. Its explanations of magnetism concepts needed to be fleshed out a bit better but I would say that overall the book performed decently in teaching me what I needed it to.
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