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The Unquestionable Truth (Part 1)

May 3, 2005 | Format: MP3

$5.99
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
5:16
30
2
5:25
30
3
4:57
30
4
1:24
30
5
4:36
30
6
3:49
30
7
3:57
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: May 3, 2005
  • Release Date: May 3, 2005
  • Label: Flip/Interscope
  • Copyright: (C) 2005 Flip/Geffen Records
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 29:24
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001O3SOMS
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars 253 customer reviews
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #79,470 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Limp Bizkit is back with their fifth album "The Unquestionable Truth, Part I" which is a surprisingly good effort.

Limp Bizkit were never a great band, but they did know how to make good frat-boy rock. Their first three albums "Three Dollar Bill Ya" (1997), Significant Other (1999) and "Chocolate Starfish" (2000) are a lot of fun. They were one of the better bands of the Nu-Metal genre, and cranked out heavy songs, with good hooks, and sing-along-choruses. It was perfect music for High School and College kids. "Nookie" was like the "Cherry Pie" of the late 90s.

After reaching their plateau with "Chocolate Starfish," the Bizkit Empire started to crumble. First, guitarist Wes Borland left the band. He was not only the most creative member of the band and their biggest talent, but was their guiding force. Then there was Fred Durst's embarrassing public infatuation with Brittany Spears. The bands search for a new guitar player, in which they had the contenders sign a contract forfeiting any music they played at the tryout, further damaged their reputation. Then after hooking up with guitarist Mike Smith, the band released the horrific "Results May Vary" album. Although it went platinum, it was almost universally panned by both critics and all, but the most hard-core of fans. Add to this the fact that by the mid-`00s, the whole Nu-Metal genre was passé. Limp Bizkit, were, like, sooo 1999. By the release of "Results" Limp Bizkit was going down. They were about as cool as Warrant and their future looked bleak...

But then guitarist Wes Borland returned to the fold, so it seemed that all was not lost. Could his return revitalize the band? The answer is, quite simply, yes.

"The Unquestionable Truth, Part I, is a strong comeback for the band.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
After a couple of spins, I can say I really dig this album. It does have a Rage Against The Machine vibe, but it's still very Bizkit at the same time. The track opener,"The Propaganda pretty much sums up the direction of the album as a whole will sound. "The Story" is probably my favorite track off the album. The main riff is very thrash (slightly reminds me of Anthrax ) the whole song just rips and doesn't let up, which is how I like it. The Truth is probably the most RAGTM-esque song on the album."The Key" reminds me of those "Hidden" tracks at the end of songs from previous albums. The band as a whole seems to really gel pretty well throughout it. The closer on the album "The Surrender" is a completely different tone from the rest of the songs collected, but it's welcomed, and a great way to close TUTP1.

Wes Borland returning on guitar has made LB whole again. He keeps everything glued together and manages to make the whole thing work.

And I do like that Fred's writing on this album is a bit more serious and I guess you could say more tolerable. Their's still quite a bit of language, not as much as previous albums (save Results May Vary) but I guess that's to be expected. I would love for them to release an album with no cursing. It'd just be mind boggling honestly. that said, I can't wait for TUTP2.
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Format: Audio CD
What I am about to say is directed towards those of you who hate Limp Bizkit without having any real reason to...

First, I shall say this. I am a huge music fan. I listen to all kinds of music, from metal to electronica to acoustic to you name it. My musical taste expands from all realms, including Marilyn Manson, Prince, Bjork, Green Day, etc. I am not some teenage punk who spends his days in Hot Topic looking over the newest "The Used" t-shirts. But I am a teenager, 16 years old.

Limp Bizkit was introduced to me back in 1999. Since then, I have fallen madly in love with them, disliked them (as well as all other nu metal bands), and then matured. My musical tastes had drastically changed over time, and I didn't even want to give this band or my once favorite, Korn, a second chance. Then, one day, out of pure curiosity, I listened to these bands again, especially LB with the release of this new EP, and discovered that I liked them for a reason. I wasn't some dumb little kid who didn't know good music from bad, though I would agree that I listen to much better music now overall. But these bands had a heart, a reason, something to say (even if they didn't say it in the best way they could have). And that's something these new "punk" bands like New Found Glory, Simple Plan, Good Charlotte, etc. could never say about themselves without crossing their fingers behind their backs.

Now, later nu-metal overall did become watered down and repetitive. But look at LB and Korn's earlier works and you'll feel a raw energy, something much deeper that most people seem to overlook. The music isn't only heavy, but funky, head bobbin. The number one fault of everyone who has become a typical LB hater is that they look at the band and especially Fred Durst in the complete wrong light.
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Format: Audio CD
It's freaking 2013 glad I finally decided to give this one another try. On my first listen years ago I only liked "The Truth" and ignored the album for years.

This album most resembles the raw pure aggressive and not overly-polished sound that Three Dollar Bill Y'all had. This makes sense since Ross Robinson produced both of these albums (and is rumored to be working on their 2013 release Stampede of the Disco Elephants)

I know a lot of LB fans that don't like 3 Dollar Bill, but I loved it. So if you liked that one you must pick this one up too. It took me a few listens to love 3 Dollar Bill so expect the same with this album.

Rating: I docked one star only because of length. I wanted more than 30 mins; however, at the current price it's still a steal.

Favorite tracks: The Truth, The Propaganda (especially the riffs at 2:20 into the track), and The Priest (most intense lyrics/message). I like every track on this album except maybe "The Key" which is really an interlude.

*** I love all their CDs so I tried to provide an objective review here; I hope this was helpful***
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