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$34.94
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book is in great shape inside, but is showing its age a bit. Pages are unmarked and clean, but one has a small wrinkle at the edge. Book edges have some wear and a light smudge or two. Cover has several rubbed spots. Dust jacket shows some age and use. Despite the cosmetic issues, overall this is quite a nice copy!
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The Unspeakable Confessions of Salvador Dali Hardcover – 1976

4.3 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

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Language Notes

Text: English, French (translation)
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 300 pages
  • Publisher: Morrow; 1st edition (1976)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0688029957
  • ISBN-13: 978-0688029951
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.2 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,888,557 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
To fully understand the motives behind the works of Salvador Dali, it is imperative to read this book- go directly to the source! I have never come in (indirect, albeit) contact with someone so uniquely intriguing and incredibly amazing. Dali writes about childhood memories, philosophies on wealth, contact with the world and how he views the continually shifting events taking place around him. For anyone who looks over Dali's masterpieces as incomprehensible or obtuse, please take a look at this book- Dali appears to defend his motives, making it easier for viewers to analyze his works. However, once you think you have a foothold in the world of Dali, he pulls the rug right out from under you and denounces the practice of analyzation! A delightful journey-- well worth the time!!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I don't believe a word that Dalí said in this book. Nor do I disbelieve anything. Mostly, I think the literal truth of any statement he makes is irrelevant. You should treat this as a Dalinian self-portrait in words, as vivid, precise, and impossible as any of his paintings.

Dalí makes it clear that Dalí's biggest achievement is Dalí. He recounts even his masturbations and defecations. Nothing is mundane in his world. Everything has some glow of the holy, profane, crass, or inspiring, and it's not clear that there's any difference. He is free with his opinions on the famous names in his circle, including Picasso and Coco Chanel. He's also free with his opinions on art, or rather on artists, especially the Spanish and most especially the Catalan. Dalí is proudly Catalan, so it's only natural that artists would rise in his esteem as they become more the way he sees himself.

It's not quite clear how much of the wording is literally Dalí's and how much came from Andre Parinaud, the compiler and editor. The book's underlyinmg time-line is quite linear, not a trait I associate with Dalí's writing. Even so, this book gives an other-wordly look into Dalí's incredible mind.

//wiredweird
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Salvador Dali was working on his image from an early age, according to this image-building exercise. He aimed to shock his father, his school mates, his fellow artists. Very often the stories become more outlandish as we laugh with him at the expense of narrow-minded people. He was a fascinating personality and I was left puzzling about what was the real Dali and what was the facade.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I don't believe a word that Dalí said in this book. Nor do I disbelieve anything. Mostly, I think the literal truth of any statement he makes is irrelevant. You should treat this as a Dalinian self-portrait in words, as vivid, precise, and impossible as any of his paintings.

Dalí makes it clear that Dalí's biggest achievement is Dalí. He recounts even his masturbations and defecations. Nothing is mundane in his world. Everything has some glow of the holy, profane, crass, or inspiring, and it's not clear that there's any difference. He is free with his opinions on the famous names in his circle, including Picasso and Coco Chanel. He's also free with his opinions on art, or rather on artists, especially the Spanish and most especially the Catalan. Dalí is proudly Catalan, so it's only natural that artists would rise in his esteem as they become more the way he sees himself.

It's not quite clear how much of the wording is literally Dalí's and how much came from Andre Parinaud, the compiler and editor. The book's underlying time-line is quite linear, not a trait I associate with Dalí's writing. Even so, this book gives an other-worldly look into Dalí's incredible mind.

-- wiredweird
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