Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Up the Walls of the World Mass Market Paperback – May 5, 1955

4.4 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Mass Market Paperback, May 5, 1955
$54.58 $0.01

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and more. Read it now
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

James Tiptree, Jr (1915 - 1987) was the pen name for Alice B. Sheldon.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Ace (1984)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0441854710
  • ISBN-13: 978-0441854714
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 1 x 5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,472,336 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Important Information

Ingredients
Example Ingredients

Directions
Example Directions

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
James Tiptree Jr. tells a fascinating tale of bizarre aliens and flawed humans in the novel "Up the Walls of the World". On Earth, a burned-out doctor leads a government project to test a group of higly dysfunctional human telepaths. On the wind-world of Tyree, a group of aliens try to stave off the destruction of their sun by a creature know as the Destroyer. To save themselves, they could jump into the minds of the human psychics, but should they? Should they sacrifice the lives of a few people to save their own race from destruction? Such moral questions lie at the heart of Tiptree's work. Tiptree (aka Alice Sheldon) does a fantastic job of portraying the pain and pathos of the humans, and the society and culture of the Tyree, all with the intense, poetic prose that she is so well known for. A deep and beautiful work.
Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book is way too complex to do justice in 1000 words or less, but trust me, it is a great work. I love the way everything comes together in the end, with each of the characters getting both what they want, and their just desserts! The style is classic Tiptree, poetic and beautiful. When my son was a newborn and required three feedings a night, I used to nurse him while reading this book...and I read it four times, and found something fresh in it each time.
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By M. Fenn on September 18, 2013
Format: Hardcover
I came to Up the Walls of the World knowing very little of James Tiptree, Jr. I knew that the author's real name was Alice Bradley Sheldon and that her publisher kept her identity secret until 1977 (the year before Up the Walls of the World was released). The science fiction community argued over who Tiptree was (some sort of government spy perhaps) and what gender (both Robert Silverberg and Harlan Ellison assumed male).

But that's all I knew. I'd never read her stuff, even though several of her books have been on our bookshelves for ages. So, it was with a lot of curiosity and excitement that I started reading what was Tiptree's first novel for my next WOGF challenge book. It held up to that approach, I'm happy to say.

Up the Walls of the World is a complicated tale, starting in the brain of the Destroyer, an entity larger than a solar system moving through space in existential pain. It considers itself evil and a betrayer of its kind.

Tiptree introduces us next to an entity that can pick up on that evil. She is a Tyrenni, part of a race of creatures resembling manta rays who ride the winds of a large gas planet's atmosphere and communicate telepathically and through the changing colors of their bodies. Something is destroying the Tyrenni's planet.

Next we meet a group of plain old humans. Well, not exactly. They're a group of supposedly telepathic folk conducting experiments at a US Navy laboratory.

The book moves amongst all three of these. I was most interested in the Tyrenni because I had never read anything like them before. Tiptree did a great job of creating a wholly other sentient species that is utterly unhuman, and she still found space to play with gender and society.
Read more ›
1 Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Tiptree employs lyrical, gorgeous prose throughout this novel of destruction and rebirth. There are telepathy and psychic phenomena, alien body-snatching and parental love, youthful energy and the exhaustion of old age. So many themes resonate throughout this gorgeously written, ambitiously imagined, and perfectly realized novel. A must-read for all fans of science fiction.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse