Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Upon the Head of the Goat... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Clean and unmarked.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Upon the Head of the Goat: A Childhood in Hungary 1939-1944 Paperback – March 24, 2003

4.4 out of 5 stars 28 customer reviews

See all 21 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$8.99
$2.99 $0.01

Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for the Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
$8.99 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Upon the Head of the Goat: A Childhood in Hungary 1939-1944
  • +
  • The Girl in the Green Sweater: A Life in Holocaust's Shadow
Total price: $18.59
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

These memoirs of a Hungarian girl liberated from Bergen-Belsen, said PW , are among "the most powerful accounts yet written by a survivor of the Third Reich." Ages 12-up.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

“A simple and beautiful account of the life of a Jewish family as, step by step, war and anti-Semitism creep closer to the Hungarian town in which they live, finally engulfing them.” ―The New Yorker

“Through the description of the destruction of this family, the enormity of the annihilation of European Jewry is shown...A sensitive portrait of a remarkable young girl and her family” ―Starred School Library Journal

“This is a book that should be read by all those who are interested in the Holocaust and what it did to young and old” ―Isaac Bashevis Singer

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 213 pages
  • Publisher: Square Fish; 1st edition (March 24, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0374480796
  • ISBN-13: 978-0374480790
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.6 x 7.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #233,886 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio Cassette
A young Jewish girl -- nine when we first meet her and nearly fourteen when the book ends -- experiences the beginning of World War II with her parents in Hungary (and her grandmother in the Ukraine). Eventually, she, her family, and all the Jews of their small town, are forced to leave their homes and await a train that will take them to Auschwitz. This is a terribly sad coming of age story that is accessible to children older than ten. It doesn't explain the Holocaust, but it goes further than most books in allowing readers to 'experience' the fear, confusion, and especially the courage felt and displayed by the characters. Indeed, the author, who based the story of her own experiences, does an outstanding job drawing all the characters, including a number of the non-Jewish townspeople and one particular non-Jewish Hungarian soldier. It is especially interesting to learn so much about small-town life in the Hungarian-Ukrainian border region. It is sad, but not at all morose. It is inspirational -- because so many characters, young and old, display courage and fortitude in the face of increasing misfortune. And it is filled with compassion -- you almost feel sorry for the non-Jews who turn their backs on their Jewish neighbors. In one scene, the young narrator, who can only take a few items with her into the ghetto, gives her record player and records to her non-Jewish friend, to hold for her until she returns, even though they have not spoken to each other since the Jewish children were excluded from the town's schools. You can feel the hope of the narrator that someday she might return, get back her records, and they can play together again.Read more ›
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This was the first book I read about the Shoah in Hungary, and it was so fascinating that it got me interested in all things Hungarian. It's different from many books about the Shoah in that the majority of it takes place before the Nazi invasion of Hungary on 19 March 1944, when the remaining members of the Davidowitz family are shipped off to a ghetto. Though life is growing increasingly hard for them because of the anti-Jewish regulations and the strain of living during a war in general, and Piri had to stay in the Ukraine with her grandmother and older sister Rozsi longer than she expected to because of a border war, the Davidowitzes still have a pretty normal and decent life before they have to leave for the ghetto. During this time the family also does their part to help other Jewish families and people in need, even with hiding them in safe houses or helping to smuggle them across borders, and Iboya, the next-youngest of Mrs. Davidowitz's children by her first marriage, is very involved in Zionism. And even in the ghetto, Piri's family and her best friend Judi's little family live the best they can, trying to keep their spirits up and to be happy. Piri and Judi both have their first romances in the ghetto, in fact. It's not one of those books that starts out happily and then quickly moves to the ghetto and then the camps. In fact, the book ends as they're leaving the ghetto in the cattlecar, and only a short postscript tells us what happened after that.

The book is also interesting because not all of Piri's siblings are at home, unlike many other Shoah books where all of the family are in the same house.
Read more ›
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I pick up a lot of books for my children and myself at the library. I did not realize when I picked this up (it was on hold) that I'd intended it for my 10 year old. I began reading it, and was well engrossed into it before my mother came over and commented on the cover of the book. "You're reading a children's book?" she asked. I had not realized it, but it was a Newbery Honor book, and I looked at the spine and indeed it was a "YA" book. Well, you could have knocked me over with a feather because I honestly could not imagine my 10 year old reading this with much understanding or sympathy. Not because I would not want my children to read this book, don't get me wrong - I would love for them to grasp its connections to the soil, the sunlight and the way families used to live before chemical warfare eradicated a way of life. My children seem so...naive...and I don't know that it's a bad thing for them to be, but I think they would have difficulty with grasping this story because of their lack of awareness of 'evil' in the world, and it might be very hard to relate to for them, and finally, it might give them nightmares. I would feel comfortable if they were in 7th or 8th grade, but at fourth grade, it seems difficult to bring up the few graphic details and high concepts in this story (being 'violated'-raped, suicide - why a doctor kills himself, removal from the neighborhoods, hiding from soldiers, persecution, Jewish diaspora, groping by soldiers, etc., etc.)

The book was beautifully written, even with some of the difficulties in following characters (Molcha, for example, is mentioned without introduction and we are supposed to understand who she is, and it goes on in this way throughout the narrative, but it does not detract from the story in any way).
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Upon the Head of the Goat: A Childhood in Hungary 1939-1944
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Upon the Head of the Goat: A Childhood in Hungary 1939-1944