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Urban Science Education for the Hip-Hop Generation Paperback – February 24, 2010

4.1 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 142 pages
  • Publisher: Sense Publishers (February 24, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9087909861
  • ISBN-13: 978-9087909864
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.3 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #478,644 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you're a teacher in a city and are interested in creating a classroom that engages children who have been systematically marginalized, this book is essential. It is the only one of it's kind and Chris Emdin is incredible. Don't believe me? Check out one of his videos online THEN come back and buy this book.
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Magnificent book that bring in the reality of our public schools system were minorities students ( mostly Africans, African Americans and Hispanics) are wrongly assess as not communicating their knowledge in science.

This book clearly recommends teachers to engage in reading and interpreting the unfamiliar gestures and verbal languages of the multicultural students in the science classrooms.
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Format: Paperback
Not surprisingly, the hip-hop generation and science educators within urban education classrooms experience major conflicts of interest. Unfortunately, within this tug-of-war for power, students tangibly succumb due to the overarching goals of meeting annual year progress (AYP) and the overwhelming focus on passing standardized examinations. In essence, since educational establishments measure success by grades earned without taking the systematic fallacies into account, urban students suffer and are stigmatized as lacking the ability and desire to achieve in science. Various scholars stand at the forefront challenging this idea that is in route to causing an apartheid among minorities who have the ability to become scientists (see Banks, 2003; Ball and Muhammad, 2003; Noguera and Wing, 2006).

Edmond reveals a host of factors that prohibits fruitful connections in between urban science education learning communities and the hip-hop generation. Traditionally science has been monolithically taught in spaces where educators lectured to students with the expectation that students will regurgitate the disseminated data through a test or lab project, while the hip-hop generation learning style unapologetically vary from the antiquated science teaching methodology. These intelligent students have higher chances at achieving when teaching methodologies allows dialogues among peers, just as it is within the hip-hop culture. This dialogue empowers student to be free thinkers and mentally digest information. The author notes that "participants in hop-hop generally view science classrooms as fields that impede their excitement about learning new things or actively participating in an activity" (p.31).
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I'm currently mid-way through this book and really enjoying it. For those who haven't heard of him, Emdin is a prof at the Teacher's College of Columbia University, and co-founded the Science Genius B.A.T.T.L.E.S. w/ GZA of the Wu-tang Clan (an initiative where NYC students create science-based rap). Through a combination of his own experiences and academic education research, he discusses the points of view many of his students bring to the classroom, how these can lead to an oppositional relationship between students and educators, and most importantly how the collaborative, communicative nature of hip-hop mirrors aspects of scientific work and can be used as a way of bringing students into science. It's an informative and thought-provoking read. Personally I've been thinking a lot about these topics given that my institution serves Chicago's diverse population and has a focus in particular on teen education, but I think it's relevant even if you are encountering students in a university setting. It's important to realize that students who are high academic achievers come from a variety of backgrounds and may be straddling multiple worlds as they navigate the education system. It's also an interesting meditation on the nature of authority and valuation of different kinds of knowledge.
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Format: Paperback
This book is amazing. The ideas are innovative, the critiques of schooling are spot on, the challenges for educators are inspiring, and it makes me see that the hip-hop generation has immense potential. I will recommend it to every science teacher.... better yet every educator I know
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