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VANISHING CONSCIENCE, THE Hardcover – March 22, 1994

4.8 out of 5 stars 32 customer reviews

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From the Back Cover

'Nowadays the word sin is rarely used in public discourse, ' says John MacArthur. 'Human misbehavior is usually treated as a medical problem rather than a moral one. Guilt is seen as a harmful emotion and, as a result, guilt feelings are denied rather than dealt with.'And, unfortunately, the church has become part of the problem instead of the solution. Instead of proclaiming the Bible's teaching about depravity and guilt and repentance, the church too often echoes the world's thinking on the psychology of guilt and the importance of feeling good about ourselves.Audiobook --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

John MacArthur is the pastor-teacher of Grace Community Church in Sun Valley, California, president of the Master’s College and Seminary, and featured teacher with the Grace to You media ministry. In more than four decades of ministry, John has written dozens of bestselling books, including The MacArthur Study Bible, The Gospel According to Jesus, and Slave. He lives in Los Angeles.

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 280 pages
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson (March 22, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0849908426
  • ISBN-13: 978-0849908422
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 1.1 x 11.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,048,216 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
As a child, adolescent, young man, and, yes, even as an adult, there stood ever before me one whose teachings and opinions guided my life. Although short in physical stature and of limited formal education, this man was and always will remain a giant in my eyes. In fact, my admiration and respect for him and that for which he stood grows greater with each passing day. That man was my Dad.
In his book, The Vanishing Conscience, John MacArthur, Jr. reiterates those teachings which I have both loved and hated throughout the majority of my life. My Dad, from my earliest recollection, taught my brother and I that regardless of what those around us might say or do, we were always, always to do that which we knew to be the right thing to do. We were instructed that we were, as individuals, personally responsible for that which we spoke, did, even thought and felt. There was made no mention of self-esteem, of political correctness, of compromise, of shades of gray; the moral rainbow consisted solely of two colors: white and black (right and wrong). That truth exists today as it has always existed, despite mankind's attempts to philosophize it into oblivion.
In this, the latter portion of the twentieth century, it has become fashionable to preach the gospel of self-esteem while eschewing the principle of personal responsibility. Psychology and Science appear to be able to place the blame for any deviant, aberrant, bizarre and/or socially unacceptable behavior on virtually anything or anyone excepting, and thereby pardoning, the individual who commits the breach of what was once considered reasonable behavior. Nothing and no one is safe from the finger of reproach with the single exception of the perpetrator.
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Format: Audio Cassette
I believe one of the authors concerns in writing this book was to asess how the Church and individual Christians both view and deal with sin,and then to look at how the maintenance of a good conscience can help the Church of Christ have a greater influence in the world. The author sees one of the Church's weaknesses (not being a lack of effort and involvement in our society)but that the Church often becomes more influenced by the world's values than the reverse. The Church must not get sidetracked into thinking its purpose is to reform society. The Church should be salt and light but its purpose and commission Pastor MacArthur points out in the intoduction is to proclaim the gospel, God's message of salvation to save those who will repent and believe in the Lord Jesus Christ. How our society deals with guilt and the Biblical remedy are quite different. If we are thinking Biblically guilt exists because of sin. Our society wants to rid people of guilt but not by dealing with sin God's way,that is repentance. Our culture's way is to remove personal responsibility and accountability by promulgating a victim mentality. Another way our society deals with guilt P.23 "is by classifying every human failing as some kind of disease."This seeks to remove guilt (by getting rid of personal responsibility)by making sin to be sickness. Pastor MacArthur has so much insight as to what ails our society and how that can be remedied.

In Chapters 2 and 3,what the conscience is and how it functions is an invaluable part of the book. A weak and seared and healthy(or strong)conscience are very clearly distinguished. Chapters 5 through 10 are concerned with various aspects of sanctification(The believer being set apart for God and how to Biblically deal with sin).
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Format: Paperback
John MacArthur's 'The Vanishing Conscience' is a pivotal work exposing the insidious sham of modern psychology's band-aid approach to the metastasizing cancer of sin. It belongs on the top shelf of every discerning Christian's library, alongside Dave Hunt's 'The Seduction of Christianity.'
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
John MacArthur pinpoints a terrifying tendency of American society. Today, no one is guilty. Everyone is a victim of his environment, his upbringing or his DNA. Thus, no matter what you do, there is always someone else to blame. The author demonstrates the insidious nature of this problem both for society and for the spiritual welfare of individuals. If there is no guilt, there is no need for repentance. Without repentance and faith, there is no salvation.

MacArthur gives many examples of the victim mentality. Some would be humorous if the subject were not so serious. He also thoroughly debunks the victim syndrome and shows that a sense of guilt over sin is healthy and helpful. It's like the oil light that comes on. The light isn't the problem. It's a signal that you better stop the car and fix the engine. A sense of guilt serves the same purpose as the oil light.
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Format: Hardcover
John Macarthur makes a very good case against the horrible turn western society has taken in the last century towards heathenism. This problem is not a laughing matter, and John obviously agrees. He takes a serious stance against sin. He shows a powerful comparison between the spiral of moralty shown in Romans 1 and the spiral of morality the United States has been rapidly taking.

He doesn't just point to the world, but he also looks at the church, who is supposed to bring light into a dark work, and exposes the many dangerous doctrines floating around concerning sin. (i.e. we should get over our guilty feelings rather than repenting of sin)

This is a good book that really exposes a bad problem. Whatever your denominational preference, this book is for you - as long as you don't have a problem with sin being called by its true name!
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