Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Qty:1
  • List Price: $26.95
  • Save: $2.70 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Vampire God: The Allure o... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by bacobooks
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: *****We Ship FAST. Usually within 24 hours. FREE Tracking/Confirmation.*****
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Vampire God: The Allure of the Undead in Western Culture Paperback – October 6, 2009

4.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$24.25
$19.39 $19.15

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and more. Read it now
$24.25 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Vampire God: The Allure of the Undead in Western Culture
  • +
  • The Vampire Film: Undead Cinema (Short Cuts)
  • +
  • Dracula
Total price: $47.75
Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Compared with most academic books, Vampire God is a delight to read. Hallab brings a wry sense of humor to her book--and humor is something, it seems to me, lacking in most critical works. Within the limited focus of vampire lore and literature, Hallab covers a lot of ground, and she covers it superbly." -- Eric Miles Williamson

Hallab offers enough new insights to keep even jaded, well-read scholars interested, and her wealth of examples and obvious enthusiasm for the subject will likely entice even readers with only a passing interest in the subject. It is certainly a worthy addition to any library. Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts
Hallab s book is a fascinating read that is expansive and informative without ever being boring. On top of that, she has a great sense of humor (especially when it comes to religion) that is a welcome ingredient to such an academically engaged text. Fans of the horror genre in general or vampires in particularly [sic] would do well to pick this one up. Pop Theology
timely and interesting For the influx of new students schooled in the pop-cultural sexuality of the contemporary vampire, Hallab ups-the-ante beyond fashion and fandom, insisting there are more profound ways to hang out with the damned. Journal of American Culture
Vampire God offers a wide-ranging introduction for students and academics seeking a concise review of canonical and scholarly vampire literature [and] offers an expansive survey of predominant themes and preoccupations of vampire literature over time that is both lively and accessible. Religion and the Arts
Among the numerous studies published about the vampire in film and fiction, I would certainly rank Hallab s Vampire God at the top. She has mastered the ability to blend her discussion with both interesting detail and larger social significance a difficult balancing act indeed, and one that few have accomplished in cultural studies. Gary Hoppenstand, editor of The Journal of Popular Culture
Compared with most academic books, Vampire God is a delight to read. Hallab brings a wry sense of humor to her book and humor is something, it seems to me, lacking in most critical works. Within the limited focus of vampire lore and literature, Hallab covers a lot of ground, and she covers it superbly. Eric Miles Williamson, author of Oakland, Jack London, and Me"

From the Back Cover

It seems we're awash in vampires these days, in everything from movies, television shows, and novels to role-playing games, rock bands, and breakfast cereals. But what accounts for their enduring popular appeal? In Vampire God, Mary Y. Hallab examines the mythic figure of the vampire from its origins in early Greek and Slavic folklore, its transformation by Romantics like Byron, Le Fanu, and Stoker, and its diverse representations in present-day popular culture. The allure of the vampire, Hallab argues, lies in its persistent undeadness, its refusal to accept its mortal destiny of death and decay. Vampires appeal to our fear of dying and our hope for immortality, and as a focus for our doubts and speculations, vampire literature offers answers to many of our most urgent questions about the meaning of death, the nature of the human soul, and its possible survival after bodily dissolution. Clearly written, with wry humor, Vampire God is a thoroughly researched, ambitious study that draws on cultural, anthropological, and religious perspectives to explore the significance and function of the vampire in relation to the scientific, social, psychological, and religious beliefs of its time and place.

"Among the numerous studies published about the vampire in film and fiction, I would certainly rank Hallab's Vampire God at the top. She has mastered the ability to blend her discussion with both interesting detail and larger social significance--a difficult balancing act indeed, and one that few have accomplished in cultural studies." -- Gary Hoppenstand, editor of The Journal of Popular Culture

"Compared with most academic books, Vampire God is a delight to read. Hallab brings a wry sense of humor to her book--and humor is something, it seems to me, lacking in most critical works. Within the limited focus of vampire lore and literature, Hallab covers a lot of ground, and she covers it superbly." -- Eric Miles Williamson, author of Oakland, Jack London, and Me
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 180 pages
  • Publisher: State University of New York Press (October 6, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 143842860X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1438428604
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.4 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,276,928 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5 star
50%
4 star
0%
3 star
50%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By RNS VINE VOICE on November 22, 2009
Format: Paperback
While I read this book primarily for background for a journal article I'm writing on Flannery O'Connor's use of a mummy by one of her characters in her novel, Wise Blood, I have to say that readers will be VERY pleased to have access to this thorough, humorous and helpful discussion of vampires for their papers, theses, and -- yes -- nightmares.

Mary Hallab, Ph.D. draws upon a long and distinguished teaching career and publications explicating works by Henry James, Angela Carter, William Blake, Edgar Allan Poe, Washington Irving and Herman Mellville, to provide us with a thorough exploration of vampire myth and lore from their early appearance in Greek and Slavic folklore, through the Romantic period, right through to its' present starring role in present-day popular culture.

Hallib contends that men and women have always been fascinated by vampire lore because of our deep-down desire for immortality. Argues that through explorations of literature and film versions of vampires acting out roles in which they refuse to accept everyman's destiny of dying and decaying to dust -- those involved are able to wrestle with their own fear of death. Indeed, the very discussion of vampires over the ages has allowed for code-worded conversations about individual doubts regarding death and the nature of one's soul.

The book is divided into six chapters: (1) Vampires and Science; (2) Vampires and Society; (3) Vampires and Psychology: Body, Soul and Self; (4) The Religious Vampire: Reason, Romantics, and Victorians; (5) The Religious Vampire: The Twentieth Century; and, (6) The Vampire God: Nature and Numinious. Graduate students will forever be in her debt for the extensive chapter-by-chapter notes and list of "Works Consulted" that follow the text.
Read more ›
Comment 20 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Normal Guy on September 25, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Interesting book, kind of dry though. You will find Hallabs point of view interesting, but at the end of the book you'll realize that there could have been more.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Vampire God: The Allure of the Undead in Western Culture
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Vampire God: The Allure of the Undead in Western Culture