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Van Gogh [VHS]

2.4 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Actors: Jacques Dutronc, Alexandra London, Bernard Le Coq, Gérard Séty, Corinne Bourdon
  • Directors: Maurice Pialat
  • Writers: Maurice Pialat
  • Format: Color, HiFi Sound, NTSC
  • Subtitles: English
  • Rated:
    R
    Restricted
  • Number of tapes: 1
  • Studio: Sony Pictures
  • VHS Release Date: September 29, 1997
  • Run Time: 158 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 2.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6302895146
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #215,257 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

VHS tape

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Doug Anderson VINE VOICE on August 17, 2013
Format: DVD
Maurice Pialat (who was himself a painter before he became a filmmaker) is not interested in the mythic version of Van Gogh as the suffering artist, he's interested in Van Gogh the salt-of-the-earth man. Pialat's Van Gogh does not suffer for art (Pialat never shows Vincent as anything but happy when painting) nor from debilitating loneliness and depression (Pialat's Van Gogh is quite sociable and always surrounded by people who adore him and his work) so much as he suffers simply because he cannot sell a single painting. Pialat's Vincent Van Gogh is an extremely normal guy with normal male needs and desires, he doesn't suffer from any psychological disorder just a low sense of self-esteem (and headaches). Unfortunately, in order to make his version of Vincent Van Gogh stick, Pialat makes some questionable choices. I've never heard any of Van Gogh's biographers mention anything about an affair that Vincent may have had with Dr. Gachet's teenage daughter Marguerite but that is the central drama/focal point of this film bio that focuses on the last two months of the artist's life. You can see why Pialat is fascinated with his imagined version of Marguerite, and why his version of Vincent would be attracted to this bold young girl (had Vincent been as he imagines him to be and had she been as Pialat imagines her to be). Unlike her pseudo-bohemian father, Dr. Gachet, or Vincent's pseudo-bohemian brother, Theo, Pialat's Marguerite is an actual living breathing bohemian embodying the spirit of everything Vincent believes in. Had Vincent had a companion like this, he probably would have had a much happier final two months. Unfortunately for Vincent, there is no reason to believe that this particular version of Marguerite actually did exist.Read more ›
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Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
A great movie about a great painter. What this unusual movie shows is how gentle, and painful Van Gogh was. Van Gogh seemed like an unfinished person, looking for being loved, in the tender sense of the word. We thus discover his complexity, which is fundamental to appreciate the person behind the paintings. Apart from the main character, the camera work is beautiful, the atmosphere is perfect, in the sense that it is far from being overdone, as if the film maker was showing this part of Van Gogh's life with respect, and humility. You should love this movie, if you don't need loud messages.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is a competent rendering of the last weeks in the life of the fine arts painter Vincent Van Gogh in the rivertown Auvers-sur-Oise northwest of Paris. It's strength is its locations that are very authentic and the French personalities and settings that Van Gogh experienced and that would be lacking in any film not set in France and likely made by a Frenchman. There are plenty of innocuous conversations, luncheons and garden and nature walks. The most interesting relationship in the film is between Vincent and Dr. Guichet who is physician, arts patron and friend to the artist. They live on opposite ends of town - the doctor and his daughter living in a large house surrounded by greenery and warbling birdsong and the transient artist who sets himself up in a gray garret by the train station with pot-bellied and mustachioed worker types living with their hard and testy wives.

While this production misses the mark in many ways - Dutronc's Van Gogh lacks a certain physical and verbal intensity to be expected in the artist - and there is the ongoing sense that we are on a controlled and clinical 1990s film set instead of in Auvers in 1890- this is probably the closest art aficionados will get to the story unless it is re-told using many of the realistic elements found in this film but with a better narrative and performative versimilitude. Dutronc as Van Gogh, perhaps to his credit, has no sense of celebrity or speciality in the film and the director re-inforces the blandness of events - even Van Gogh's "accident" with a pistol which ends the artist's life at age 37 years. If bland is to be read as "unexpected" or "surprised" by Van Gogh's suicidal tendencies (as with his jump in the river at an outdoor social), it makes little impact.
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Format: DVD
Along with Victor Erice's El Sol de Membrillo one of the few great films about a painter.
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Format: Amazon Video Verified Purchase
Subtitles in some scenes were blurred
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Format: DVD
this item did nothing to educate nor inform the audience of the artist Vincent VanGogh as a person nor his work
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Format: DVD
This should not be viewed as a 'biography'. It is a ficticious movie that presents Vincent as a lady's man.

It is made even worse as a 'life of the artist' because all the actors are very convincing and resemble their namesakes. A viewer who does not know more than the usual 'van Gogh was crazy and he cut off his ear' will unfortunately take this account as truth. But even they will be confused, as I was, because at this period in his life, Vincent's ear would have been disfigured.

It would have been a better idea to present this as a French Impressionist who lived at the same time, but with a different name. The period scenes, rooms and railcars are nice.

Nice touches are when Theo's wife is bathing, she resembles a Degas bather.
In the deleted scenes, there's a funny one of Vincent observing a family with a baby taking it's first steps. It's a reference to the Millet painting 'First Steps', that Vincent made his own copy of. He makes a grumbling remark about that 'damn Millet'. This likely isn't the way he would have felt about that artist either, since he greatly admired Millet and made many many copies after Millet's work. But-it's still funny to someone who gets the joke.

Your money would be better spent at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC, where you can see van Gogh's 'First Steps-after Millet'.
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