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on April 30, 2018
I love the book and am happy with the whole transaction. Would use this seller again. Thank you!
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on April 29, 2018
Good book
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on December 11, 2017
I first saw Ms. Atlas's recipes when I wanted to find out if there was a way to make acceptable, truly kosher matzo balls without eggs. There may not be, but that didn't prevent the author from writing a recipe for something that looks vaguely like them, but is more like dill-flavored oatmeal in taste and texture. Alright, so she failed a probably impossible hurdle. What was really inexcusable was what was supposed to be her vegan answer to classic Ashkenazic chicken soup for those balls. The standard carnivore version uses lots of chunks of onion that are not sauteed and add a delightful sweetness, has bite-sized veggies including the spicy sweet parsnip, and only cooks the veggies ~20 minutes so that they have flavor and aren't tasteless mush in the mouth. Instead of retaining what she could from the original, her recipe butchers it by relying on a base of store bought all-purpose vegetable stock, replacing the usual parsley with celery leaves, adding lots of flavor deadening potato, and tries to rescue it by including a full Tblsp of random seasoning blend (she doesn't say what). I've made a lovely chickenless soup with the traditional recipe minus chicken and just added a little nut oil (to hold the flavors), used less water, added a Tblsp of cider vinegar, upped the salt a bit, added a few smashed garlic cloves, put the minced dill and parsley in only for the last couple of minutes of cooking, and maybe put in a couple of sprigs of fresh savory or sage to suggest chicken. Try it, vegetarians, you'll like it, and I gave it to you free. But if you're vegan, you'll have to eat it with whole wheat matzo and vegan margarine on the side, because there's no such thing as an edible vegan, pesadich matzo ball.

I looked at her mediocre vegan "honey" cake and thought how much better it would be with the date syrup called silan or even light molasses than with the agave and maple syrup she put in.

Finally, I wondered if she does better when she's not trying to veganize tricky holiday favorites so I searched online. What I found was a Thanksgiving nut and rice loaf w/ some veggies and a little tofu, and nothing to hold it together (she didn't even blend some of the nuts into nut butter) but inexplicably she added soaked flax seeds--was that supposed to do it? And the result looked much less appetizing than the classic British lentil nut loaves that have been standards in vegan cuisine for almost 100 years. Then I found her vegan Shepherd's pie in which the sauce was rice milk and Braggs, instead of any of the readily available, tasty, highly rated recipes for vegan gravy.

I'm sorry but my overall impression is that she thinks about some non-vegan food she misses, bumbles around in the kitchen adding this and that from her vegan stockpile until she comes up with something that looks like the original and has a definite taste (not necessarily an appealing one) and believes it is worth other people's money. I have to disagree.
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on November 20, 2017
The "index" (if you can call it that) is TERRIBLE!!! What would possess a cookbook author to create a recipe book that is SOOO disorganized?
"TRY" to find a pastry crust recipe without paging through the whole book? There is no "real" table of contents. It's all by big Holiday sections. This may be nice to page through while shopping but VERY impractical. The closest thing you get to a listing of recipes is in the index by ingredients.
Really? I'm expected to be inspired to find recipes by using the index ingredients?
Not a friendly cookbook.
One person found this helpful
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on November 5, 2017
Nice variety of easy recipes to use for the holidays. A good way to cut out the animal products.
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on May 2, 2017
Great vegan recipes. Hope to use them a lot more very soon.
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on March 17, 2017
I've made several recipes out of this book, and all have turned out well. Even though it says it's for holidays, I think most of the recipes would work well in regular rotation. I like the breakdown by holiday (including Jewish ones), though, since it makes it easy to search for appropriate recipes at specific times of the year.
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on December 21, 2016
This is absolutely wonderful! My teen turned vegan and the recipes are delicious and easy to follow so now we have a new cook in the family.
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on December 17, 2016
This book is so attractive it got stolen!!
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on September 29, 2016
I have two or three hundred cookbooks, many of which provide recipes for very new tastes, ingredients, or combinations. Sometimes though I need to make dishes that are close to those things that were traditional in the time and part of the country where I grew up but are a vegan version that non-vegans around me will accept without asking or worrying whether they are eating an ingredient that they consider unusual. This book fits the bill and also means that I can decide on the spur of the moment to add a new item to the menu (most recently the ginger cookies from this book). Those who have cooked from many cookbooks will be well aware that although there may be great photos in some books, the recipes don't necessarily work well. Across all of her books, the recipes work, with the only modification I have ever made being to add a little water to her strawberry snack cake (similar to strawberry shortcake). Each year at Thanksgiving our coworkers look forward to the 50 or so pumpkin mini loaves that I make from this book and give as little gifts. In this and her other books, such as the one on cooking greens, it is apparent that the reader is reading the work of a scholarly/educated writer who is accomplished in the kitchen though the tone is quite accessible and friendly regardless of one's expertise. This book is pleasing in that I often find something new in it but also reliably captures the expected dishes and flavors. I wish this and all the books she has published over the years were available in Kindle versions. I just bought a second copy of this book this morning as a backup so I can have a copy at another residence where I often cook. Of my hundreds of cookbooks, this is the one I pick up the most often, especially to sove a problem (i.e. how do I use up my red bell pepper, orange juice, vegetable broth, and lentils? By making her lentil-stuffed squash, which comes with tips for those who are intimidated by cutting a squash (she tells you how to pre-bake it so it will be easier to cut). I appreciate her books because they are practical and undemanding in terms of time and ingredients yet not so stripped down that eating the dishes feels like any sort of compromise. I make her items-as suggested by this title- for holiday guests and hers is the one cookbook where I don't worry about pre-testing the recipes. She has a solid background and knowledge base in her work and it shows. And there are sufficient photos to give you an idea of what you are getting and the layout and typeface are such that it is feasible to read while cooking. Well, time for me to go try her cranberry carrot cake with maple cream cheese frosting. I am looking forward to whatever books she writes next and I bet the recipes will be uncomplicated enough to dive in and make on impulse, with satisfying results. Across her books, she makes a solid and welcome contribution to vegan and vegetarian cookery.

An update: today I made the cranberry carrot cake. The recipe didn't work. The directions said to pour the batter in the pan. Although I had made the batter as described, it could not be poured. "Pressed," maybe, but not poured. I added a little extra applesauce and a bit of rice milk so it would come closer to being pourable. The baking time was 10 minutes longer, I assume because of the extra liquid. The cake did not look or taste good at all and unfortunately I am discarding it. I made additions to the batter so that of course affected the results. But the recipe as written did not work. The recipe for the strawberry snack cake didn't work either but it was ok when I added water, as noted above. Although her recipe for the mini squash (pumpkin) loaves works fine and the ginger cookie recipe is ok (not amazing, but ok), I am sorry to report that I would be cautious about trying the recipes for baked goods. But the recipes that are for main dishes, so far, seem to work ok and the cookbook is definitely worth having for the other recipes.
7 people found this helpful
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