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The Veldt (Tale Blazers) Paperback – September, 1982

4.7 out of 5 stars 20 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Ray Bradbury was born in Waukegan, Illinois, in 1920. Growing up during the Great Depression, Bradbury began writing at the age of 11. Unable to join the military in World War II due to his poor eyesight, he began publishing science fiction stories. In 1947 he married Marguerite McClure and they had four daughters. His career as a writer included such notable works as Fahrenheit 451, The Martian Chronicles, and I Sing The Body Electric. Primarily known for his successes in science fiction, Bradbury also worked on various horror and mystery stories, as well as screenplays and television scripts. During his lifetime he received numerous awards, including a Pulitzer in 2007. Bradbury passed away in 2012.
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Product Details

  • Series: Tale Blazers
  • Paperback: 42 pages
  • Publisher: Perfection Learning (September 1982)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0895989662
  • ISBN-13: 978-0895989666
  • Product Dimensions: 0.2 x 5.2 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #444,656 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Ray Bradbury's short story is really a treat. It's a criticism on not only automation in the household but how electronics and media get in the way of good communication between parents and their children, and in fact build up resentment toward the parents.

The children love their electronics and think their parents are crazy to want to take that way and be a family again. Their solution to this problem is chilling.

The book is written in an education format, where children write responses and essays to Bradbury's story.

Recommended, especially for teachers and young readers.
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Format: Paperback
I read this story as a young adult (in 6th grade) and I am now in my 30's and the impact and storyline has never left me. The Veldt combines sci-fi with the imagination and fleeting, yet intense, emotional responses of children. Ray delves into a child's mind and shows how aware children really are, and why they should be given more credit by adults. While the story can be considered a smidge disturbing a times, it's inherant brillance and poetic timing has made it a story to pass on to all generations. As with all Ray Bradbury material, this one is a must read, must keep, must share!

-Jaime
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Format: Paperback
Society has evolved to a place where a home can babysit and raise your kids for you, with a nursery that will bring to life anything your child imagines. George and Lydia Hadley were happy to purchase their Happylife Home so affordably, where lights turn on as you walk in a room and the house clothed and fed and rocked their kids to sleep. But something is awry in the nursery. The room is stuck on an African Veldt land with lions feeding and vultures looming- and this imaginary world feels all too real.

When George asks the kids about their African playground, the kids deny that's where they've been and when Wendy, his daughter, quickly runs ahead of George and changes the scenery, he knows they are hiding something.

Realizing that giving the kids everything they've ever wanted probably wasn't such a good idea, he begins to shut things down- including the nursery. But too little- too late, and at the end of the tale, George and Lydia finally realize why the screams coming from the nursery every night sounded so familiar.

Bradbury never fails to strike me with his descriptive wording- even in a short short story such as this:

"The hot straw smell of liongrass, the cool green smell of the hidden water hole, the great rusty smell of animals, the smell of dust like a red paprika in the hot air."

"Like a red paprika..." Hunh. Love that.

I'm also sensing, Bradbury really didn't like modern entertainment and the direction it's heading. He must have felt that eventually it would atrophy the brain and spoil the kiddos.

He was right.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great story. For so long, I talked about this story, but couldn't remember who wrote it or the title. Finally, after Google searching it, I was able to track it down and share it with my children. This should be required reading. It obviously stayed with me after all these years! Ray Bradbury had the exaggerated vision back then of an entitled generation with technology at the cause of it. Hmmmm...seems kind of eerie when we look at the way life is today.
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By Alex on June 11, 2015
Format: Paperback
You have the universe encased tightly within four glass walls, yet your connection to the world is as bleak as the effort your parents have put into raising you. Ray Bradbury’s The Veldt provides a very possible future, in which “odorophonics and sonics” replace the need for human bonds. Our own world may not have perfectly adaptive rooms that stimulate each of your senses at the flicker of a thought, but it’s definitely heading somewhere close.

The Veldt was a wonderful story and, albeit short, it carried a strong message. Many strong messages, in fact. It showed readers that the amount of work one has to do is not inversely correlated with how happy they are, and that relying on technology for everything we do can sever bonds that it never even let develop.

The tale begins with the Hadley’s, a happy futuristic family living in a technologically consumed world. Problems arise when Lydia asks George to investigate their kids nursery, a four walled room that can take the kids’ thoughts and transform them into a three dimensional reality. It’s meant to be used to watch over their psychological behavior. At the time the story takes place, the Hadley children have turned the nursery into an African veldt.

Everything goes downhill when the lions in the nursery seemingly attack the Hadley’s, leaving Lydia to believe the nursery has become too real. She asks George to have the family take a break from all the technology in the house, and realizes she hasn’t even bathed the kids or made them breakfast at all herself, since the “ Happylife Home” system did it all for her.

It as at this point that the Hadley kids, Wendy and Peter, are introduced, and immediately the effects of the house become clear.
Read more ›
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Format: Paperback
The Veldt by Ray Bradbury is a haunting story filled with foreshadowing. The short was written in 1950 and was first published under the title of The World the Children Made. The year today is 2015, and yet the things that occur in the story which was written 65 years ago, has many truths that apply. The addiction to technology, the lack of human interaction and the increase in attitude towards adults.
The Veldt consists of six characters. George, Lydia, Peter, Wendy, the Happylife Home and the Dr. McClean. Peter and Wendy are the children of George and Lydia. They are obsessed with the house as you will discover as you read.
This is a story that is haunting, chilling, and frighteningly realistic. It is creepy but not in the usual sense. It is creepy in a way that you might feel if you were being followed. It makes your stomach churn and twist.
Bradbury writes from George’s perspective in first person. George appears to be a man of slight intelligence. He can’t control his children and he has no way to learn anything. His wife is Lydia and she is just as bad if not worse than George because she indulges Peter and Wendy.
All in all this story can fall under suspenseful mystery or sci-fi. It is futuristic and bone chilling. If a person wanted a quick read that would cause them to see the world differently, they should read this. However if one didn’t want a different view, this is a book that can make you think and question the world around them.
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