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Crown of Vengeance (Dragon Prophecy) Hardcover – November 13, 2012

4.3 out of 5 stars 100 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

“A thoughtfully created world, engaging characters, and a tighter plot than many fantasy epics make this new novel a must-have.” ―VOYA on The Phoenix Unchained

“Lackey and Mallory combine their talents for storytelling and world crafting into a panoramic effort. Filled with magic, dragons, elves, and other mythical creatures, this title belongs in most fantasy collections.” ―Library Journal on To Light a Candle

“Delightful.” ―Booklist on The Outstretched Shadow

About the Author

MERCEDES LACKEY and JAMES MALLORY have written the Enduring Flame trilogy, which includes the New York Times bestseller The Phoenix Transformed, and the Obsidian Trilogy: The Outstretched Shadow, named Best Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror by VOYA; To Light a Candle, a USA Today bestseller; and When Darkness Falls, a New York Times bestseller. Lackey lives in Claremore, Oklahoma. Mallory lives in Baltimore, Maryland.
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Product Details

  • Series: Dragon Prophecy
  • Hardcover: 608 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books; First Edition edition (November 13, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0765324385
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765324382
  • Product Dimensions: 6.5 x 1.8 x 9.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (100 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,145,777 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Having read both the Enduring Flame and Obsidian Mountain trilogies, I was intrigued by the back history of Valiessiar Farcarinon, who is referenced in them. I found it a very engaging story, difficult to put down. It is interesting to compare those original elves to the "modern" ones depicted in the new series. Farcarinon is obsessed with revenge and the prophecy about the Endarkened. The background about He Who Is clarifies much that was mentioned in the Obsidian books. It is a brutal story about a brutal people, far removed from the placid elves of the other books. It is a very enjoyable addition to the legendarium. I look forward to the future books in this Dragon Prophecy series.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Although it's the same world, it's hard to compare because of the centuries difference within the stories. Consider Europe during the middle ages, and compare with 18th century regency. Still same world, maybe same families or descendants of same, but behavior, culture, political situation, war practices, etc., all are very different.Characters in this new and earlier world are more raw, wilder, aggressive than those in the sequel. I'm sure it was written intentionally so. It was certainly a more primitive world, fulled with unrestrained magic, ruthless soldiers and lords. Characters seem less civilized than those in sequels; but this gives more veracity to the story, more reality. I think that after this trilogy I'm looking forward to, there's going to be an inbetween trilogy to bridge the transition to the historically latest and the original three. I's a great story that needed to be told.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Finally, the story of Vieliessar Farcarinon! I've been curious about her since her first mention in the Obsidian Trilogy. I spent the entire book wondering when the Dragons would show up, but I guess I'll have to wait longer.

I do rather wish sometimes that Mercedes Lackey didn't have such a fondness for long complicated names. In the Velgarth universe, it shows up in the nobles of the country of Rethwellan. In the Obsidian universe, it shows up in Elven names. It does rather leave her distinctive mark on her novels, however. With names like that, you know she had a hand in it.

The book was enjoyable, fascinating, impossible to put down! Now I'm waiting with baited breath for Book 2!
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Format: Hardcover
First in the prequel trilogy, the Dragon Prophecy Trilogy, in the overall Obsidian Universe series. In this one, we finally meet Vieliessar Farcarinon, who fulfills the prophecy as its Child and prepares her world for invasion.

I suspect the next two will find the Elvenkind at war with the Endarkened and set the stage for the lack of magic in The Outstretched Shadow (Obsidian Trilogy, #1).

My Take
There were aspects of this that were quite thrilling and others that were just annoying. Why do authors feel the need to give us incomprehensible names. Sure, I get that Tom, Dick, and Mary won't cut it, especially in tales about the elves, but names like Bolecthindial and Hamphuliadiel?? I swear, the length of this book could have been cut by at least a quarter if they had used shorter names!

And I'm probably spilling the beans that the side of the Light are Elvenkind...whoops...as Lackey/Mallory certainly don't mention it often. And possibly the reason for this is to portray them as human with all the foibles and weaknesses of man. It's for sure that humanity is not alone is wanting power or being greedy.

Another irritation is the convoluted writing that the authors use to create a sense of old-timeyness, but some of it is so torturous that I can't figure out what is being said no matter how many times I read it.

It certainly does provide a different take on elves than we usually get. This crew is so cruel and stupidly ambitious. It's as though we're getting a peek under the covers of what they're really like! Then there's the other side, the bad guys. The He Who Is, whom I assume is God, is more of an Old Testament God with his cruelty.
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Format: Hardcover
This one got off to a good start, and honestly, it's not a bad story, but I had serious trouble coping with all of the Elven names. Personal names, family names, house names, I just couldn't keep up very well. I'm not saying that the story itself was too convoluted or byzantine, or that the authors TRIED to create something hard to read, I just found it really hard to keep up with the multi-syllabic names at all.

Mercifully, a few characters had shorter nicknames, but I do think it's telling that as I write this review, I can't remember a single character name in full. Makes it hard to remember the action, hard to talk about, even harder to write about as a review.

I've read the previous trilogies by these authors and didn't have this same trouble, so I think it's in part simply due to the sheer volume of odd, overlong names that I've had trouble.

Another issue is with the writing style in general. It's got a more epic tone/style, and doesn't feel similar to the more fairytale-like Obsidian Mountain trilogy (the first one). I think the writing style gives the stories a less personal feeling, and find it harder to relate to the actions. More character based/personal stories are my preference.

Part of the charm of the other series comes from the contrast between the cultural differences between the elves and, well, everybody else. This book is all about the elves, with no inter-species interactions. I think it would have been better not to keep things so separated/sequestered, just because the conflict/shock of contact can be so entertaining.

I'm giving this one a 4 star review, because I don't think the story is mediocre at all (which would lead me to give a 3), but on some level I'm not sure I liked it quite that much. 3.5 might be more like it.
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