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Version Control with Git: Powerful tools and techniques for collaborative software development 2nd Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 51 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-1449316389
ISBN-10: 1449316387
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Editorial Reviews

Book Description

Powerful tools and techniques for collaborative software development

About the Author

Jon Loeliger is a freelance software engineer who contributes to Open Source projects such as Linux, U-Boot, and Git. He has given tutorial presentations on Git at many conferences including Linux World, and has written several papers on Git for Linux Magazine.

In prior lives, Jon has spent a number of years developing highly optimizing compilers, router protocols, Linux porting, and the occasional game. Jon holds degrees in Computer Science from Purdue University. In his spare time, he is a home winemaker.

Matthew McCullough, Vice President of Training for GitHub.com, is an energetic 15-year veteran of enterprise software development, world-traveling open source educator, and co-founder of a US consultancy. All these activities provide him avenues of sharing success stories of leveraging Git and GitHub. Matthew is a contributing author to the Gradle and Jenkins O'Reilly books, as well as the creator of the Git Master Class series for O'Reilly. Matthew also regularly speaks on the No Fluff Just Stuff Java symposium series. He is the author of the DZone Git RefCard, and president of the Denver Open Source Users Group.

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Product Details

  • Series: Version Control With Git
  • Paperback: 456 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 2 edition (August 27, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1449316387
  • ISBN-13: 978-1449316389
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 1.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (51 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #56,128 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Galen Menzel on March 15, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Though more comprehensive than Scott Chacon's Pro Git, this book is a mess. It fails both as a reference and as a tutorial. It's written in a verbose, example-driven style, which dulls its usefulness as a reference; and the authors' ludicrous sense of pacing ruins it as a tutorial.

The chapter that is supposed to serve as an introduction to git (Chapter 3) is a scattershot mishmash of common tasks like executing a commit and once-off configuration commands like setting your commit author information. The common tasks that it covers tend to be covered very, very quickly as more of a teaser for more-complete coverage later in the book. While it's fine to delay full coverage of usage until later, reading only this chapter would leave you totally ill-equipped to do anything useful with git. By contrast, Chapter 2 of Pro Git contains most everything you need to be an autonomous, if somewhat unsophisticated, git user working in a single branch.

Chapter 4, ostensibly about "Basic Git Concepts" (since that is its title), is actually mostly about git internals, and is completely out of place at the beginning of the book. Why are we covering blobs and packfiles before we even cover what a branch is? Does knowing the git write-tree command help me understand how to use git well as a beginner? (And if you're not concerned about beginners, why include information about how to install git?) This is basic stuff, guys: cover the high-level interface first, then cover the low-level commands and internals. Would you start off a Unix tutorial by talking about disk blocks and inodes before covering what a directory is?

This pattern continues throughout the book.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Solid discussion of Git for someone like me who has primarily been using CVS and SVN (Subversion) throughout their career, and has since started using Git. While I do not view this book as the "train wreck" that the top reviewer here describes, be aware that if you are completely new to version control systems (VCS) you will likely want to look elsewhere (at least for introductory explanations), because the authors jump right into Git usage without first providing much VCS background information.

After a cursory Git introduction, the authors provide what I consider the core of the text (the first 14 chapters of 21), covering installation, how to get started, basic Git concepts, file management, the Git index, commits, branches, diffs, merges, altering commits, the stash, the reflog, remote repositories, repository management, and patches. After this core, the discussion turns to hooks, combining projects, submodule best practices, using Git with SVN repositories, advanced manipulations, tips/tricks/techniques, and use of GitHub (although I decided to skip a couple of these latter chapters, such as the one on hooks, because I do not plan to use this feature in the near future).

Working through this book, I especially appreciated the diagrams (which explain Git objects and commit graphs) and the high number of working examples (of which I recently executed about 90% or so). The diagrams which explain branching and merging are the types of diagrams typical colleagues and I white board with each other to explain a given project state, helping enable both understanding of the material as well as providing future reference for visual depiction.
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Format: Paperback
This is the first time I look at Git as a basic tool to help me keep my scripts in order. I don't code for living, all the places I have been to already has a set of version control system in place for developers. The quickest way to get going was to leverage the existing tools. It is not until now that I write enough scripts that keeping them in order is starting to become an issue. I am a big believer in 'learn once, use many times', so even though Git sounds like an overkill for my purpose, I have decided to explore the possibility of using Git for my projects.

Half way thru the book, I have already decided that this is probably going to be the only book I will ever need for Git. Combing with the build-in manual and online documentation for the latest features, there is no need for a second book on Git for my purposes. The book starts with quick history and introduction, then goes into more depth on each of the aspects of Git, starting from the most used to advance.

For regular users, reading up to Chapter 4 will likely be a good starting point start using Git and reference back here and there. Chapter 3 gave a good tour of the most used commands and Chapter 4 introduces the basic concepts of Git. Since the main purpose of Git is for collaboration of coding, it is likely that once you understand the concepts, you will need to talk to your fellow coders to come up with a agreeable setup.

Personally, I think it is ok to start reading a little faster from there on, keep an eye out and slow down when you see an applicable concept, but knowing where to look back later when you need the information is the way I approached it.

Chapter 20 is a good chapter to read in depth if you are using SVC but trying to convert to Git, Chapter 21 is a good chapter on GitHub.

Overall, I feel it was a wise investment of my time in reading this book.
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