Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Previously loved and 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed. Item may show minor wear, inscriptions, library markings, minor creases, nicks, smudges, or scuffs
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Vicksburg 1863 Hardcover – Deckle Edge, April 7, 2009

4.3 out of 5 stars 82 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
New from Used from
"Please retry"
Hardcover, Deckle Edge
"Please retry"
$15.77 $0.47

Lucky 666: The Impossible Mission by Bob Drury
Featured World War II History Titles
From the authors of New York Times best-selling The Heart of Everything That Is and Halsey's Typhoon comes the white-knuckle World War II aviation tale of friendship, heroism, and sacrifice that reads like Unbroken meets The Dirty Dozen. Learn more | See related books
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist


See all Editorial Reviews

This Book Is Bound with "Deckle Edge" Paper
You may have noticed that some of our books are identified as "deckle edge" in the title. Deckle edge books are bound with pages that are made to resemble handmade paper by applying a frayed texture to the edges. Deckle edge is an ornamental feature designed to set certain titles apart from books with machine-cut pages. See a larger image.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 496 pages
  • Publisher: Knopf (April 7, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307264254
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307264251
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 1.5 x 9.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (82 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #474,799 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Important Information

Example Ingredients

Example Directions

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By James W. Durney VINE VOICE on May 5, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Shelby Foote never claimed to be a historian and always referred to himself as a "story teller", Winston Groom falls into this category. This is not a serious history with many footnotes on each page. The book will not illuminate the thinking of Pemberton, nor analyze the military tactics of Grant. This is a good telling of the story of the North's campaigns to capture Vicksburg. This is not just Grant's campaign of 1863 but also all of the efforts to break the Confederacy's grip on the Mississippi River and split the South in two.
The book gives us a good foundation talking about how important the Mississippi River is to 19th century America and the founding of Vicksburg. While our attention is never taken from the city, the outside world is never forgotten. Richmond's wishes, directives and interference are never far from the surface and play a major role in the developing campaign. Events in Virginia, New Orleans and Port Hudson keep the war in perspective. The interaction between Pemberton, Johnston and Davis are given a proper place but is not over estimated. Grant's problems with Halleck, McClernand, the press and Washington play a role in the planning and pace of operations. Politics is almost as important as military operations in this book. This is correct as Vicksburg is of major interest to both presidents.
Are their problems? Yes, there are a number of problems with the story as the author chooses to tell it. First and foremost is the question of Grant's drinking. The author accepts as true incidents discredited by a number of current historians but well accepted at one time. The book has a number of statements about military operations that some historian's question. Again, most of these were generally accepted and still are by some historians.
Read more ›
1 Comment 23 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
I have just completed reading Vicksburg, 1863 and was appalled and astounded by the number of errors found in the book. The first, and perhaps the foremost, dealt with the John Brown raid. John Brown was tried in a Virginia court (The Civil War, A Narrative Volume 1, Shelby Foote page 32) for treason against Virginia, not by the United States government. Second item, it is stated that Leonidas Polk became a major general when, in fact, he was a lieutenant general (Generals in Gray, Ezra J. Warner, pages 242-243) when he died. He was killed (Generals in Gray, Ezra J. Warner, pages 242-243) by a cannonball (disemboweled?) at Pine Mountain, near Marietta, Georgia, not at the Battle of Atlanta. Item three, N.B. Forrest’s escape from Fort Donelson. It is stated that they waded all night through swamp water when they actually spend the night on the Charlotte Road (Nathan Bedford Forrest, In Search of the Enigma, Eddy W. Davison and Daniel Foxx, pages 57-58) and the only time they got wet was in crossing icy Lick Creek which was found to be saddle-skirt deep. Item four, the Death of W.H.L. Wallace. It is indicated that he was killed at the Hornet’s Nest. He was mortally wounded, not directly killed, and died at Savannah, Tennessee on April 10, 1862 (Generals in Blue, Ezra J. Warner, pages 536-537), three days after the battle ended. Item five, Lew Wallace in the Tennessee River swamps (there are those swamps again). His division spent the day on roads, not in swamps (Shiloh, Larry J. Daniel, pages 256-261). The only swamp mentioned was at the Owl Creek bridge, but it has a corduroyed road through it. Item six, Butler’s women’s order. The order was precipitated by a woman dumping the contents of a chamber pot on Fleet Captain David Farragut’s head (Battle Cry of Freedom, James M. McPherson, pages 551-552).Read more ›
Comment 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A talented Southern storyteller gives his version of the Vicksburg campaign. This book should serve to inform, or remind, readers of the importance of the six-month effort by the North to take the city that controlled shipping on the Mississippi River.

Winston Groom provides his take on almost everything that occurred from the present day vantage point of one who at heart wishes the South might have somehow acted in a way that did not lead to its ultimate abject defeat. He seems to think the North provoked the war (I know the South fired the first shots); he does not see why the hard war of General Sherman was necessary (I do); or why North and South could not simply come to a political compromise when the war turned bad for the South (I think because of the evil of slavery combined with a refusal by Southern leadership to accept the primacy of the federal union).

To me a most interesting and telling fact is contained in a minor foot note on page 155: After the Civil War, the city of Vicksburg did not officially celebrate The Fourth of July until 1945.

While I do not agree with all of Mr. Groom's political and social observations, I do think his book is entertaining and well written. The vivid descriptions of the numerous land battles and naval engagements make for compelling reading, while the many generals and admirals are brought to life.

Mr. Groom's book should help serve to refocus attention to the major and hard fought Union victory of July 4, 1863 at Vicksburg from the still headline battle of the same time, Gettysburg. While the few bloody days at Gettysburg remain the subject of enormous public attention, Vicksburg is the campaign (and Grant the general) that determined the Civil War's military outcome.
7 Comments 36 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews