Kindle Price: $2.99

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

The Virtue of Dialogue: Conversation as a Hopeful Practice of Church Communities by [Smith, C. Christopher]
Kindle App Ad

The Virtue of Dialogue: Conversation as a Hopeful Practice of Church Communities Kindle Edition

4.6 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
$2.99

Length: 37 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

click to open popover

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.


Product Details

  • File Size: 130 KB
  • Print Length: 37 pages
  • Publisher: Patheos Press (January 24, 2012)
  • Publication Date: January 24, 2012
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0071EY8KG
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #236,354 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Conversation: If we're willing to engage in it, it might transform a congregation. But, are we ready and willing to take the steps required to truly engage in conversation, to listen to one another, even when one vehemently disagrees with the other?

We live in an age that demands immediate results, that has become increasingly segregated, not only along ethnic and linguistic lines, but also political and generational lines. The old homogeneous principle that Church Growth enthusiasts hailed as the key to success, has been successful, but I'm not sure that the results have been beneficial to society or the church. We also live in an age where civility in conversation is a rare commodity. I realize that civility has always been something difficult to attain and maintain, but it seems as if things have gotten out of hand, making fruitful conversation difficult at best. But, there is hope and there are models that can guide us, if we're willing to engage and be patient along the way.

Part of our problem is that in our embrace of democracy, which can mean the rule of the majority (or in some cases the tyranny of a noisy minority), we find it difficult to move toward consensus. There are faith communities that work on this model, but few try it - I've yet to really try it, but it's a model that is suggestive of possibilities. It is a model that is described and illustrated in a new e-book written by Chris Smith, editor of the Englewood Review of Books and a member of the Englewood Christian Church of Indianapolis, which is the focus of the book.

Before I comment further on this brief but insightful book, I need to reveal that I've been a regular contributor to the Englewood Review of Books, and Chris has reviewed my own books.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
When Chris Smith, in The Virtue of Dialogue, steps into the story of his hurt and fracturing congregation sitting down in a circle to simply talk to each other I feel both very excited and very apprehensive. Churches need this, yes. Talking, fighting, working things out, these are all parts of a healthy relationship. I know this, and yet I still get a shooting fear rising up within me: we can't do that! People will get mad at each other. They will yell and blame us and leave the church and then we'll have even less money! It was then that I realized how broken my own Christianity was.
This is where Chris' new e-book triumphs. Englewood commits to having a regular conversation about issues weighed down with tension, and they carry on through everything rough. He admits that it was not the easiest thing to do at the beginning. The section where he explains some of the reasoning behind this is excellent:

"What would have been a tense conversation anyway was amplified by the deep fragmentation of our recent history. Like so many Western churches, we had nurtured a culture of individualized faith. Thus, when we gathered the individuals of our church community for conversation, they brought with them not only a divergent array of theological, social, and political convictions, but also deep emotional attachment to these convictions. Additionally, we found ourselves part of a broader culture that was rapidly losing the capacity for conversation..."

All of these things and more made the conversation quite messy. Chris says that people yelled, walked out, and even left the church. All of the initial fears I had about meeting for dialogue were right there. They all happened to Englewood, and there's no way it was pleasant to participate in.
Yet they survived.
Read more ›
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Englewood Christian Church is the first example of a First Century Church. For the past 5 years I have introduced bachelor and master level students to what I call 'ecclesiology in action.' When we met five years ago the leadership of ECC and I discussed our common commitment to place: living, working, playing, educating, worshipping in one location. Symbiotic relationships across the street and across Indianapolis reinforce what is the essence of a place--its people.

In "The Virtue of Dialogue" (VOD) Chris Smith introduces the reader to a concise history of Englewood. Center to Englewood's commitment is communication. The long road of agreement, disagreement, and agreeing to disagree is sketched for the reader. Chris establishes the salient features of communication that come out of Englewood's experience. Inundated by the spirit of democracy, efficiency, consumerism, individualism, and power the American church often falls prey to a business model of "doing church."

One primary, overriding concern in VOD is church size. If folks don't know each other, how will they communicate? And if people do not live in the same place, how will they truly know each other? Fostering conversation encourages unity amid diversity. If Church history teaches us anything, we know that inclusivity comes only through exclusivity. Christ followers are commited to one universal: Jesus as The Way, The Truth, and The Life. All peoples are given invitation to salvation; no one is left out. The practice of Jesus' Grace is the gift of grace to each other.

Giving space to others by the practice of grace reaches far beyond a congregation. The city of Indianapolis is bettered by the presence and work of ECC through conversations in political, economic, and philanthropic venues.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

The Virtue of Dialogue: Conversation as a Hopeful Practice of Church Communities
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: The Virtue of Dialogue: Conversation as a Hopeful Practice of Church Communities