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Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Very Good used copy: Some light wear to cover, spine and page edges. Very minimal writing or notations in margins. Text is clean and legible. Possible clean ex-library copy with their stickers and or stamps.
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Voyage Hardcover

4.6 out of 5 stars 28 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: PUTNAM PUBLISHNG
  • ASIN: B000UCFCS8
  • Product Dimensions: 7.2 x 4.2 x 1.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,498,769 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I'm sorry Sterling Hayden only wrote two books because I think he could have been one of the greats. But as with his acting career, he dropped out early, (although I must say I think he was a much better author than an actor). I read Voyage many years ago and went on to read "The Wanderer" his autobiographical work. Voyage is about a sailor and the hardships of the sea in the late 1800s. It also deals with the labor union movements of that era. A victim of McCarthyism which ended his acting career, Sterling Hayden's political agenda, in my opinion, was evident in this book. As a sailor I enjoyed it for its realism of the sea and would compare it to Richard Henry Dana's classic "Two Years Before the Mast".
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Format: Paperback
A story of 1896 written in 1976 by a man with an old soul. I envisioned a gray haired patriarch narrating this tale of a time when a four-masted barque would sail under the horn. The style is rough and heavy handed but you can taste the salt and feel the cold when he speaks of the sea. This is a hard read of a harsh time but well worth the voyage.
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Format: Paperback
While reading this huge book, it is easy to imagine Sterling doing the research. First, he would select the year for his opus. 1896 would seem like a good choice, because it was at the end of the tall ships when steam was supplanting sail, and Hayden was a lover of the ships (see his only other book, his autobiography: Wanderer). After he selected the year, he would go to a really good library and start reading the daily newspapers for 1896, jotting down events, dates, names and places. Then having compiled all his data, he would begin to compose this bestselling novel. The main focus of the book is the maiden voyage of "Neptune's Car" from Maine around the Horn to San Francisco. He has peopled the crew with very interesting and compelling characters, from the hard-driving, yet fair-minded Captain Irons Saul Pendelton, to the brutish first mate Otto Lassiter, to shipmates Harwar the Wrecker, Carmack the Anarch, a cast-a-way plucked from a deserted isle, and the ship's lone passenger MacLeod. Hayden takes the time to develop each of these characters and many others, providing them with a past, and a present, and no hope for the future. As the trip progresses, we get to know each of them personally as we learn of the extraordinarily hard life of the seaman and the futile and dangerous attempts to unionize and improve their lot. Meanwhile, we also follow another excursion: The Neptune Car's owner, Banning Butler Blanchard, sends his daughter and her ne'er-do-well husband with other socialites of the era on a pleasure cruise to Japan to witness a total solar eclipse. The juxtaposition of these two journeys gives an indepth look at the strong class distinctions of the day: the poor working stiff and the idle rich.Read more ›
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By A Customer on July 23, 1998
Format: Hardcover
I read it in the mid-70s, at about the same time as "Ragtime" was published and felt that it was in the same class. Sterling Hayden did amazing things with words in this book and managed to knit together a wide variety of the subcultures which existed in that era. Make the effort to find a copy of this book; you will not be disappointed.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Voyage reads like Whitman and Melville in a drinking contest, recognizing the attraction and dangers of the sea, the highs and lows that come with living on your own terms. Hayden had lived most of his life on a boat. When he lived in France, he lived on a boat in various docks. His love for the sea began at Long Wharf in Boston and Sausalito is where Hayden set his last anchor. NY-born and patrician Bogart had a schooner named Santana, and Hayden had his schooner Wanderer. There is no doubt that Hayden was a flawed man of Lear contradictions: he drank, railed against many things, but it seemed that he distrusted the things that came easy to him...such as acting. He disliked the Hollywood factories for creating illusion; politicians, for perpetuating other illusions and; railed against what he was seeing America become. He was outspoken about his political activism, his drinking and occasional drug use in his interviews with Tom Synder, where he looks like the future Keith Richards, but betrays himself as a writer. Hayden lived his life at odds with the `American dream,' climbing up and down the ladder of success several times over. He was a nonconformist who believed in the examined life. It is impossible not to notice the pattern that just as he was about to touch the brass ring he would walk away; but in the writing he is simply majestic, poetic, and provocative. I'd argue that his prose rivals with the best of the twentieth century's best writers.
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Format: Paperback
Maverick actor Sterling Hayden's first book was "Wanderer", the tale of how he took his children and escaped to sea. His lifelong love of sailing and his great knowledge of the sea fill the pages of "Voyage". But "Voyage" is not so much a sea story as a snapshot of America at an important, even a major turning point: the election of 1896. In that year, the Democratic party was captured by the Populist left, led by William Jennings Bryan, and was defeated in the general election by McKinley and the Republicans, thereby setting American politics on a conservative course which has lasted to our own day.
But "Voyage" doesn't talk much about the politics of the times so much as the people who lived in those times. Above all, they were hard people.
On the one hand are the working stiffs. Shanghaied into the crew of the great four-masted barques, poor brutal men who have no control over their lives, well aware how badly they are used, capable of huge tenderness and sensitivity, and immensely skilled at fighting their ships through the world's worst weather around Cape Horn. On the other hand are the great capitalists who build the ships and the railways and the banking empires, and the tough-minded captains and mates who do their work for them.
All of them are strong in their way, with a kind of iron toughness that has pretty well vanished nowadays, and they fight out their story across 704 pages of great adventure and conflict.
Hayden surprised people with this book. He took a stab at a huge important story filled with colorful, exciting characters in all their strengths and weaknesses. "Voyage" is important, and exciting, and is as close to the mythical "Great American Novel" as anything ever attempted.
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