Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Vulture Fund Mass Market Paperback – June 1, 1999

2.6 out of 5 stars 25 customer reviews

See all 13 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$1.81 $0.01

Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

More than one reviewer of his first novel (The Takeover) dubbed investment banker Frey the Grisham of financial thrillers. The comparison holds for Frey's second: the characters clatter like wooden puppets, and the prose wobbles between the serviceable and the silly, but the man can tell one exciting story nonetheless. Hotshot New York investment banker Mace McLain is recruited by his senior partner, Lewis Webster, to establish a $2 billion "vulture fund" that will buy great chunks of Manhattan properties in what Webster insists will be an inevitable real estate bust. Mace's immediate boss in the venture will be Kathleen (Leeny) Hunt, smart, beautiful and predatory. Meanwhile, the country's vice president, a Democrat, is locked in a fierce struggle with the CIA director, who's the presumptive GOP presidential nominee. Frey lets on that one of the two has suborned Webster and Leeny into working a scheme (involving professional terrorists and murder) that will shatter the New York real estate market and generate vast campaign funds. Most readers will easily figure out who Mr. Big is, but the fun here?and there's plenty of it?isn't in solving a mystery. It's in seeing a smart and tough minnow like Mace tossed into a shark tank and only to swim his way out, gills puffing and tail flashing. 150,000 first printing; major ad/promo; film rights optioned by Paramount and Neufeld/Rehme; author tour.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Frey's best-selling debut novel, The Takeover, was "a Grishamesque blend of skullduggery and intrigue" (LJ 6/15/95). Here, an investment banker uncovers a conspiracy between Washington politicos and terrorists.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Signet; Reprint edition (May 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451184793
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451184795
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 1.2 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,916,709 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
Please do not let me waste my hard earned money on another of these cookie-cutter Frey books. To be compared to Grisham is an injustice to Grisham. Grisham has shown versatility in characters, unlike Frey (have you heard of a young,hot shot, investment banker at Wall Street's most exclusive...etc, etc before??) Likewise, story lines of Grisham's (convicted murderer on death row, tobacco trial, poor man's lawyer, etc.)have shown versatility and impressive literary growth. The Vulture Fund had me scratching my head shortly after beginning, as I seemed to be reading the same sentences in several chapters (narrowed eyes, etc.). The plot seemed almost ludicrous at times as I tried to imagine the hard to fathom, splintered direction the novel was travelling. I enjoyed The Takeover in total, although I groaned at the cliches and completely unrealistic plot twists. I decided to try the next, hoping for an exciting, improved finance-based thriller for my business-fiction appetite. I am sorry for this. The books had so many similarities in characters and so little literary range it was frustrating. Please let me know of a true Grisham-caliber business/fiction writer. I would love to read an improved Frey book that takes some of the good of The Takeover and runs with new ideas and direction.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on January 4, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Stephen Frey should go back to being an I-banker because he sure can't write. His writing makes Grisham look like Faulkner. The plot is not only bad, but stretches the limits of imagination and fictional generosity. The CIA is a spy organization. It does not train special counter-terrorist military units. That's what the Defense Department and the FBI does. Also, apparently the bad guys brought Mace (the protagonist) to run the vulture fund -- even though they know he's smart and could very well be a threat -- because they needed his contacts. This doesn't make any sense. Surely the head of the bank (who masterminded the illicit fund) would have had far more contacts in the financial world than a vice-president in his bank. The dialogue is no better than the plotting, and perhaps even worse. One would hard pressed to find a vice-president in a prestigious I-bank who talks like some inexperienced high school teenager when it comes to relationships with women. In sum, the book has all the signs of a bad writer: nonsensical plot, cardboard characters, banal dialogue, and badly researched facts. This is the second book I've read by Frey (the first being The Takeover, which was also a waste of paper), and I will never read him again. I've read all the authors in the new genre of "financial thrillers" (Frey, Michael Ridpath, Linda Davies), and they should all go back to banking. A message to John LeCarre: could you please write a spy novel involving banking world.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The guy on the train with A.D.D. (see 6/30/97 comments) should buy the book on tape...or if he's lucky, they'll make a movie out of this one!

Stephen Frey has a definite gift in story writing. He has a way of capturing the reader emotionally into the hearts and minds of the characters...so that you feel what they feel and you think what they think. It's an ingeniously creative plot which takes you on an exciting journey through the streets of New York, the jungles of Honduras, the backroads of West Virginia, and the lawns of Washington D.C. The old fashioned ideals of hard earned money and tales of rags to riches are challenged by modern day political scandals and schemes of greed and desperation... testing the humanly elusive values of faith, hope, and love.

As a Wall Street professional, I found myself living vicariously through the adventures and heroics of Mace McLain...rather than falling asleep on the train.

This book will make you wonder if things like this really happen on Wall Street and in the White House...and it will make you wish the characters were really real
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I just discovered Stephen Frey recently and really enjoy his books. This one, however, was a big disappointment. I read a few reviews and found I should have paid attention because they were right on the money. This book has a great beginning that really drew me in, but as it went on, the writing went downhill and the end really seemed to be slapped together. What could have been a fabulous final third of this book, had it been developed, just kind of fell apart. He must have been in a hurry to meet a dealine or something - totally unpolished.
I highly recommend The Day Trader, and The Legacy, but would not recommend The Vulture Fund at all.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The Vulture Fund is a financial thriller wrapped around a political thriller with a rather meandering plot. There is a lot to like with this novel, but the story is a lot to swallow, and it goes on and on for well over 400 pages.

In the book Mace McClain is a young financial guru at a venerable, old financial firm that is still privately held. With Mace's help they hire on a bright and attractive recent graduate named Rachel Sommers. Mace's career is on the rise, and he also gets credit for bringing on board a terrific new recruit.

However, his firm desperately wants to get more money and the leaders devise a plan to create a `vulture fund', which will buy-up highly-leverage properties then sell them off and make a killing. This is when Mace gets involved with `Leeny', and shady financial expert who is helping set-up the vulture fund with Mace.

Before long Mace gets uncomfortable with Lenny's money-raising tactics, and Rachel helps him snoop around and find out what's really going on. In the meantime politicians are scheming to divert monies out of the investments for their own purposes, and a terrorist group is helping create a diversion that will let the financial scammers get off Scott free.

The plot is promising in a lot of ways since it covers financial shenanigans that are similar to what later happened in the Wall Street meltdown in 2008. And some of the characters are interesting too. But the plot gets pretty over-the-top at times, and probably could have been trimmed down. Overall good enough for 3 stars.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: suspense thrillers