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Walking Paperback – September 17, 2013

4.2 out of 5 stars 66 customer reviews

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About the Author

Henry David Thoreau was born in 1817 in Concord, Massachusetts. He spent time as a school teacher after attending Harvard College but was dismissed for his refusal to administer corporal punishment. In 1845, wanting to write his first book, he moved to Walden Pond and built his cabin on land owned by Ralph Waldo Emerson. It was during his time at Walden that Thoreau was imprisoned briefly for not paying taxes; this experience became the basis for his well-known essay "Civil Disobedience." He died of tuberculosis in 1862 at the age of 44.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 28 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (September 17, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1463701438
  • ISBN-13: 978-1463701437
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 0.1 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (66 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #941,317 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Top Customer Reviews

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“I am alarmed when It happens that I have walked a mile into the woods bodily, without getting there in spirit. “ (Henry David Thoreau, WALKING)

Thoreau has a very vigorous animosity against walking for exercise or efficiency--going from place to place with the least diversion. I am not sure what his deeper reasons for being ornery about it might be, but the attitude can be neatly characterized, and maybe pigeonholed, as a predictable Transcendentalist strategy against living only for physical reasons and not the more crucial, more mindful, transcendental purposes. These Transcedentalist writers of the middle 1800’s, including Emerson and others, were convinced that people were not fully achieving the spiritual, the loftier, aspect of life.

Clearly mindful walking, for Thoreau, can generate, a productive collision of our values, the values that the society inculcates in us. Things like efficiency and purpose and even the search for personal perfection of body with all the attendant concern for how we are perceived physically are devalued. For Thoreau walking was a ritual not a mechanical physical process or a mindless activity.

This long essay--for that is what it is--can be read in a few hours. But it is large in scope. It moves into a larger discussion of the necessity of wildness, the wildness of nature and of the environment and wildness in the internal make-up of human beings.

While WALKING is not as powerfully and tightly styled as Thoreau's greatest essays, it is genuine Thoreau, personally engaging, sometimes quotable, and often startlingly neighborly.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Walking is a lecture written by Henry David Thoreau. It was first published in print form in 1862, as either a long essay or a short book, depending on how you look at it. As the title indicates, Thoreau discusses the act of walking, specifically in the woods, but the scope of the piece is much broader than that. Thoreau extols the virtues of wilderness and its necessity to mankind, not only for its advantages to our physical health, but also for its emotional, intellectual, and spiritual benefits.

This work bears a great deal of thematic similarity to Ralph Waldo Emerson’s essay Nature. Both are manifestoes for the Transcendentalist movement, and both advocate the appreciation of nature for its own sake, rather than merely for the material benefits it provides to mankind. This was a revolutionary concept in the mid-19th century, and the works of Emerson and Thoreau mark the beginning of the American environmental movement. Yet despite the philosophical common ground they shared, Thoreau and Emerson were distinctly different writers. Emerson’s style is more loftily cerebral, at times difficult to decipher. Thoreau’s writing is much more down-to-earth and practical, and at times even tongue-in-cheek. Emerson was the chief conceptual thinker of Transcendentalism, but Thoreau put the group’s philosophical ideas into practice, and encouraged others to do so as well. To oversimplify, one could say that Emerson talked the talk, while Thoreau walked the walk.

To become closer to nature, one need not exile oneself to a remote log cabin, as Thoreau himself did when he wrote his masterpiece Walden. To experience the wonders of the natural world around you, all you have to do is walk. Of course, Thoreau could stroll outside his front door and enjoy twenty miles of fenceless forest.
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I felt like strapping on a pack, and losing myself in the woods. Anyone seeking nature, or escaping civilization, even for an hour, should read this wonderful and thought provoking book.
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"Life consists with wildness. The most alive is the wildest. Not yet subdued to man, its presence refreshes him. One who pressed forward incessantly and never rested from his labors, who grew fast and made infinite demands on life, would always find himself in a new country or wilderness, and surrounded by the raw material of life. "

"I rejoice that horses and steers have to be broken before they can be made the slaves of men, and that men themselves have some wild oats still left to sow before they become submissive members of society. "

"There is something servile in the habit of seeking after a law which we may obey. We may study the laws of matter at and for our convenience, but a successful life knows no law. It is an unfortunate discovery certainly, that of a law which binds us where we did not know before that we were bound. Live free, child of the mist--and with respect to knowledge we are all children of the mist. The man who takes the liberty to live is superior to all the laws, by virtue of his relation to the lawmaker. "

"Above all, we cannot afford not to live in the present. He is blessed over all mortals who loses no moment of the passing life in remembering the past. Unless our philosophy hears the cock crow in every barnyard within our horizon, it is belated. That sound commonly reminds us that we are growing rusty and antique in our employments and habits of thoughts. His philosophy comes down to a more recent time than ours. There is something suggested by it that is a newer testament,--the gospel according to this moment. He has not fallen astern; he has got up early and kept up early, and to be where he is is to be in season, in the foremost rank of time.
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