Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Usually ships within 2 to 4 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Waltzing with the Enemy: ... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Light cover wear only.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Waltzing with the Enemy: A Mother and Daughter Confront the Aftermath of the Holocaust Paperback – June 1, 2011

4.6 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$19.95
$13.98 $1.42

Popular & highly-rated in Biographies & Memoirs
Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail
$19.95 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Usually ships within 2 to 4 weeks. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Mitsios (Digital editor; Geishas and Talking Frogs: The Best 21st Century Short Stories from Japan) and her mother, Kliot, deliver a dual memoir documenting how past tragedies reverberate through the years to affect children of Holocaust survivors. Kliot recalls the anguish and daily terror of her life in Lithuania during WWII. Having survived the Holocaust with false Christian identity papers (and having helped her mother and brother survive posing as Polish farmhands), she continued the charade after the war, falling in love with and marrying a Greek man. In 1951 they settled in Phoenix, Ariz., and Kliot continued to hide her true identity from her daughter, enrolling Helen in a Catholic grade school as "a way of providing her with a Christian identity if the need ever arose.... I didn't want her to be rooted in a Jewish community that could entrap her and leave her vulnerable to discrimination." In the book's second half, Helen writes about seeking her own identity and learning of her mother's, while struggling to change her mother's fear that being Jewish would make them "outcasts." These mirrored memories provide an intimate portrait, compelling and compassionate. 29 b&w photos. (June)

Review

This memoir, an intimate recounting of two very different lives and times, is one of the most honest and life-affirming books I've ever read. It teaches us how the past informs the present and helps explain the world around us today. --Howard C. Cutler, M.D., Author of The Art of Happiness: A Handbook for Living, co-authored with His Holiness the Dalai Lama

Mitsios and her mother, Kliot, deliver a dual memoir documenting how past tragedies reverberate through the years to affect children of Holocaust survivors ... In the book's second half, Helen writes about seeking her own identity and learning of her mother's, while struggling to change her mother's fear that being Jewish would make them ''outcasts.'' These mirrored memories provide an intimate portrait, compelling and compassionate. --Publishers Weekly
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Urim Publications; First Edition edition (June 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1936068214
  • ISBN-13: 978-1936068210
  • Product Dimensions: 6.3 x 0.7 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #625,041 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
The counterpoint of two very different voices make this book so incredibly powerful. The mother's story is an unforgettable one of great wit and determination to stay alive and outwit Nazi persecution told in spare prose. The daughter's is about inheriting PTSD and trying to step away from the "ghosts of the Holocaust." Rasia teaches her daughter that the world is a dangerous place and remains vigilant and protective, going so far as to baptize and raise her as Catholic, and instructing her daughter to never tell anyone that they are Jewish. She insists her daughter, like herself, carry on with a protective false Christian identity even decades after the Holocaust. As the daughter tries to separate from her mother's overly protective grasp, as she visits her grandfather's "grave" at a place of mass murder in Lithuania, I was moved to tears by the elegantly subtle writing. This is one of the most revealing and important accounts I've read by a daughter of a Holocaust survivor.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
What a privilege it was to read this beautifully written book. It is about Raisa, a girl who survives the Holocaust and how she did it. Eventually she marries a Greek man and doesn't want to admit she is Jewish. When Raisa becomes a mother she has her baby girl Helen baptised and raised as a Catholic. Helen, a beautiful and sensitive flower, wonders why they have no family and eventually learns the secrets her mother has been keeping.

She adores Raisa, is horrified about all she has endured, admires her strength and wants to help her come clean about being Jewish. This true story makes you realize how the Holocaust affects the children of survivors; how much suffering they also go through and how desperately they want to help their parents. As if mother/daughter relationships weren't complicated enough, this adds a whole new dimension and is a very important read. I highly recommend it.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This is truly a remarkable work, which manages to tread perfectly the fine line between the moving and the maudlin. It is part historical adventure, as the mother avoids annihilation during the Holocaust; it is part the daughter's Coming of Age in Arizona by way of Vilnius; and it is all a remarkable story about how the wounds of war are passed from one generation to the next. It's a very good--and very original--read.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Waltzing with the Enemy is really two books in one. The first part is the story of Rasia Kliot, who was born in Vilnius, Lithuania and survived the Holocaust on a false indentity. The second part is about her daughter Helen who was born in Montreal, Canada. In June, 1941, the Germans arrived in Vilnius. This was the start of the suffering of the Jews, including Rasia. Part of Rasia's family was in a ghetto, when she wasn't living on her false identity, Rasia lived with them. After the ghetto was liquidated, Rasia was able to find different hiding places for her Mother and brother. Her father had been taken away early in the war. In 1944, Rasia was able to travel to Vienna, living with a friend of hers. Eventually, she met and married a young Greek man named Christos. After the war, they lived for a short time in Israel, then, moved to Canada. This was the start of a new life for Rasia. The second part of the book focuses on Helen, the daughter of Rasia and Christos. Helen was born in Canada, her family moved to Arizona when she was four. When she was about eight, Helen left public school and attended a Catholic parochial school. To Helen, this was like having three religions in one house. Her mother was Jewish (although she didn't acknowledge it), her father was Greek Orthodox, and Helen was Catholic. To Helen, this was all very confusing. While I very much liked this book, I gave it four stars only because some of it is a bit confusing. I have found that quite often when I've read a book by a Holocaust survivor living on a false identity, I really can't keep up with the story. Because of the circumstances, their situation changed so fast, so often, and so dramatically and I end up mostly confused. Other than that, I thought this was a great story which I very much recommend.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Co-written by Rasia Kliot and Helen Mitsios, the first half of the book is in Rasia's voice, a Holocaust survivor and Helen's mother. Her account of her upbringing and the sheer determination that kept her alive through the Holocaust (as well has her ability to pass for Polish due to her fair coloring) is understated, lacking in self-pity, and deeply moving. The second half of the book is in Helen's voice, about her experiences growing up in the Greek Orthodox church and going to Catholic school, finding out about her mother's Judaism later in life. I was touched by Helen's self-awareness as someone stuck in the liminal spaces between cultures and an inheritor of trauma that was unspoken but somehow internalized by her (as is the case with so many children of Holocaust survivors). I could not stop reading. Elegantly written, with a deep understanding of human nature, this book is worth picking up not only because it's a well-written story, but also for its understanding of how traumatic experiences get passed down through generations and how to survive (and hopefully thrive) in spite of them.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: biography books