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Waorani: The Contexts of Violence and War 1st Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0155037977
ISBN-10: 0155037978
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Product Details

  • Series: Case Studies in Cultural Anthropology
  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Wadsworth Publishing; 1 edition (November 7, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0155037978
  • ISBN-13: 978-0155037977
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.4 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,661,139 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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By E. N. Anderson VINE VOICE on March 16, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book is an absolute "must read" for anyone interested in human violence. The Waorani were perhaps the most violent people on earth until peace was brokered by missionaries. They were the terror of their neighbors, but they also killed each other; peace may have saved them from self-destruction. The Robarcheks had previously studied the Semai Senoi of Malaysia, who lived in a similar way--by shifting cultivation in tropical rainforest--but were virtually without any violence, ranking as probably the most peaceful of humans. The Robarcheks sought to see why such similar societies (which even raise their children in broadly similar ways) had such extreme differences in violence level. The most important finding was that both groups were menaced by, and afraid of, stronger neighbors. The Waorani could fight back, but could be secure only if they could truly terrorize their stronger enemies; the Semai could only flee, and learned to deal with danger by flight rather than by fight. The two cultures developed many social and psychological mechanisms for reinforcing these differences. The Robarcheks use these examples to reject naive theories that claim humans are violent or aggressive by nature. In fact, human cultures vary enormously in their approaches toward violence, and humans vary their behavior accordingly. Implications for dealing with violence are discussed in the book, and are of obvious importance for the world.
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Format: Paperback
The Huaorani/Waorani tribe of Ecuador first came to world-wide attention in 1956 when they were known as Aucas (Quichua for "savage"): five American missionaries were speared to death upon trying to establish peaceful contacts with them. Subsequent books by missionaries (e.g., Elisabeth Elliot's "Through Gates of Splendor") and journalists (e.g., Joe Kane's "Savages"), along with the discovery of major oil deposits underneath traditional Waorani homeland brought the knowledge of this tribe to a wider audience. In 2004 a documentary film, "Beyond the Gates of Splendor" was made, looking at the lives of many Waorani and those of the martyred missionaries. In that film, anthropologists Clayton and Carole Robarchek gave articulate, knowledgeable interviews that enhanced the quality of the documentary. This book, "Waorani: The Contexts of Violence and War" is the full-length treatment about their time living with the Waorani and the conclusions they drew about them (which formed the basis for the comments made in the film).

The Robarcheks spent time living with the Waorani in 1987 and again on a follow-up trip in 1993. They had previously spent time living with the Semai tribe in Malaysia, quite similar to the Waorani in many respects - hunting with blowguns and darts, cultivating manioc, similar systems of descent, living deep in a rainforest with primitive technology - and yet for all the similarities, the Semai were some of the most peaceful people around whereas the Waorani were one of (if not the) most violent societies on earth. What made the difference? And why did the Waorani murder rate suddenly drop 90% in the early 1960s? These are part of what this book explores.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Well researched and clearly written [Please keep my name anonymous]
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Excellent condition. No rips or tears. No writing or previous highlighting. Good purchase overall. Although a little more pricy compared to others.
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