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War of the Worlds [Blu-ray]

3.4 out of 5 stars 1,327 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

A dock worker trying to piece his life together finds a new definition of survival when an alien attack commences in his New York backyard. After the initial devastating attack, the survivors try to mount an offensive against their enemy only to find that the oldest of all weapons may be their only hope.

Special Features

  • Revisiting the Invasion
  • The H.G. Wells Legacy
  • Steven Spielberg and the Original War of the Worlds
  • Characters: The Family Unit
  • Previsualization
  • Production Diaries
  • Designing the Enemy: Tripods and Aliens
  • Scoring War of the Worlds
  • We are Not Alone
  • Galleries
  • Theatrical Teaser Trailer HD

  • Product Details

    • Actors: Tom Cruise, Dakota Fanning, Tim Robbins, Miranda Otto, Justin Chatwin
    • Directors: Steven Spielberg
    • Writers: David Koepp, H.G. Wells, Josh Friedman
    • Producers: Colin Wilson, Damian Collier, Kathleen Kennedy, Paula Wagner
    • Format: Multiple Formats, AC-3, Blu-ray, Dolby, DTS Surround Sound, Dubbed, NTSC, Subtitled, Widescreen
    • Language: English, French, Spanish, Portuguese
    • Subtitles: English, French, Spanish, Portuguese
    • Dubbed: French, Portuguese, Spanish
    • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
    • Number of discs: 1
    • Rated:
      PG-13
      Parental Guidance Suggested
    • Studio: Dreamworks Video
    • DVD Release Date: June 1, 2010
    • Run Time: 117 minutes
    • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,327 customer reviews)
    • ASIN: B003BJO8KU
    • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,257 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
    • Learn more about "War of the Worlds [Blu-ray]" on IMDb

    Customer Reviews

    Top Customer Reviews

    By DAVID BRYSON VINE VOICE on July 25, 2005
    The War of the Worlds is a great novel and Spielberg is a director of exceptional talent and accomplishment, so I had been hoping for a lot from this film. In the event, I have got part of what I was hoping for. Very occasionally, a novel can be 'walked' straight on to the screen (The Big Sleep, with a script by Faulkner, is a striking case), and I found myself wondering whether this novel might not have benefited from the same treatment. Some of Spielberg's changes are perfectly reasonable, others less so in my own opinion. It makes perfectly good sense to bring the action forward by a century into the present day, for instance. I suppose there's no harm either in changing the main actors from Wells's scientist with a wife and a brother to a dysfunctional American family, as this may provide enhanced 'human interest' or some such benefit for all I would know. Again, I have no real problem with the way the film combines the roles of the curate and the artilleryman in the book into the single persona of the former ambulance-driver, and I can well understand that Spielberg would have thought it prudent to tone down the socialistic elements in this aspect of the story in order to avoid setting off the wrong types of reaction in American audiences. What I do have a major problem with is the appearance of the Martians themselves. I'm sorry to report that these have far too much in common with a certain wretched TV series. The author's own description is one that stays in the memory, to say the very least, and Wells's Martians look the way they do for very clear reasons that he provides. What was gained by going downmarket in the way Spielberg chooses to do? Nothing that I can think of except perhaps better audience figures from harking back to that ghastly broadcast series.Read more ›
    29 Comments 261 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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    Format: DVD
    Spielberg's version of H.G. Wells' classic yarn of alien invaders making purée out of feeble humans get's a thrilling blockbuster treatment. The director piles on the terror as bad-dad Tom Cruise, stuck with weekend custody of his hysterical (even before things turn gruesome) kids, flees the ever-increasing destruction of the tripod killing machines (which are superbly realised). Much scarier than the 1953 version with Gene Barry, the film manages to keep escalating the tension either in scenes of epic urban demolition, or claustrophic games of hide-and-seek with the aliens in Tim Robbins' (as the nutty survivalist) dank basement.

    The film is a white knuckle ride right up until the missing third act, when the movie ends so abruptly I thought I had been sent a defective DVD with about 6 chapters missing. But no, Spielberg sticks to Wells' original ending, which was scientifically innovative when he wrote it but is totally lame now. Surely the writers could have tried to refresh this story with a more interesting denouement, perhaps based on what happens after mankind's amazingly lucky reprieve, followed by the return of the clued-up aliens after we had mastered their technology?

    After the adrenalin rush recedes only irritating questions remain: why haven't the aliens heard how the story 'War of the World' ends and brought cold remedies with them? Given that they rely on humans as food, why does their primary weapon vaporize people and spare their clothes (when the oppposite would be so much more convenient)? Why does Cruise watch a TV broadcast of how the tripods are systematically wiping out major cities and then decide the safest thing to do is... head for a major city?

    What I like about this movie is the point of view.
    Read more ›
    Comment 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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    H. G. Wells wrote the novel over a century ago and Steven Spielberg has done a fantastic job of incorporating some of the literary tale's elements into his version: the tripods and their ear-shattering "ULLA!", the heat ray, the retaining baskets, the growth of the "red weed," the demented "Ogilvey" (Tim Robbins), the devastating onslaught from the invaders, man's futile efforts to defend himself, and the final "solution," among other parts familiar to fans of the book.

    The director also paid tribute to producer George Pal's 1953 Technicolor classic by using a similar "probe" into the basement occupied by Cruise and daughter Fanning, the destruction of a church, an American setting, and a brief appearance by the earlier film's stars: Gene Barry and Ann Robinson.

    There are many tense scenes, making this film not quite suitable for younger audiences. The sound is loud and abrasive, befitting the on-screen destruction. Surprisingly, John Williams's score is quite subtle and, on occasions, is barely audible.

    Actingwise, Cruise, contrary to his behavior off-screen, asserts himself well as the estranged father of two kids who must now do all that he can to save his children, as well as himself. Fanning's strong performance shows why she is one of most popular child performers today. And Robbins is appropriately creepy as the man with the plan to bring down the invaders.

    While megahit "Independence Day" toured similar ground, "War of the Worlds" is more the work of a master storyteller and his name is Steven Spielberg.

    That alone makes it a film not to be missed!
    4 Comments 259 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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