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on January 1, 2018
I stumbled upon this book series by accident and now the whole family is addicted. This story is one that you cannot put down and will leave you wanted to complete the story of Sophie and Josh Newman. With amazing twists and turns, the story is interlaced with historical figures, familiar sceneries, and shows the authors understanding of the historical characters in this book. Amazing story would recommend as a book for the whole family from 4th grade and up. But really everyone loves this series in my family and it leads to great book talks.
Enjoy!
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on September 7, 2016
I don't know what all the hype is about concerning this "classic" novel. It was a bit boring which rendered it uninteresting. I have read westerns older than this and found them to be very entertaining. The Oxbow Incident, The Searchers, The unforgiven or even Shane were light years ahead of this book.Revisionism at it's worst.
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on July 10, 2015
Leaden writing, redundancy and slow pace drag down an ambitious and sophisticated novel about the infancy of justice, order, community and morality in the American West. Should you read it? Absolutely. Will you sometimes want to put it down forever? Uh huh. Much better sociology than literature, but still a brave imagining of place and time--with serious kudos for creating western women who are more than cliches and encompassing early labor activism, class and north/south issues as well as cowboy/gunslinger mythology. It took me almost halfway to be hooked, and I got that far out of respect for Pynchon and the NYRB reprint series--but then there was no turning back.
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on March 25, 2013
Enter the Hero...or is he? Clay Blaisdell: the lone gunslinger with a dark past. Enter the Villain...which one: is it the miners on strike who threaten to engulf the entire town of Warlock into its namesake of war; a war against capitalism itself in forms, and at times. Is the villain the town doctor who takes up their cause? Is the villain the masochistic Tom Morgan, who is more than what he seems and ,yet, even more than that... Perhaps it is the Regulators who are consolidated after the miner's strike and the catalyst of events in the first third of the novel, led by Abe McQouon(forgive my mispelling) and his cadre of assassins whose Libertarian attitudes are in direct clash, with, the town's people who establish a committee and liberally enact a code of law, of posting, of death; augmented further by the addition of the citizen one, Kate Dollar, who also has a past...which is the true villain? Enter the protagonist, Bud Gannon; complete with the stoicism of the old western sheriff of lore, and lessened by his all too human nature and balancing of justice's pendulum, he is at odds with the Town, the Miners, the Regulators, Morgan, and potentially even the new Marshall himself, Blaisdell. Ranked highly by cult legend Thomas Pynchon, and for good reason, this novel has it all: satire of politics and relationships, violence, and some serious thinking points if you can get past the dreadful (it is meant to be so...) scenery of the old west. A precursor to the incredible Blood Meridian, but with punctuated sentences and easily translatable structure, this novel is as good as any western gets; quite incredibly so. If you are of an intellectual affinity than the journals of the town merchant will satiate your thirst for five dollar words.
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on March 17, 2018
Outstanding read. Great, complex and finely drawn characters. A favorite of the young Kesey and Pynchon both, if I'm not mistaken. And if so (or not) for good reason. Awesome.
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on May 28, 2016
The story of how the Wild West really was and how people behaved back then and how they still behave. A thought for the reader is that not everything and everyone is good and bad. Nothing is black and white there is is a large number amount of grey. Peoples motivation is typically selfish and self serving.
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on August 31, 2017
A good read. The movie was actually pretty close to the book.
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on May 25, 2013
I enjoyed this story and was glad to see some of the (SPOILERS AHEAD) history of Danu Talis and how it all came about. Seeing some other mythical characters come to life was interesting as well and is always a nice treat when stories do it differently than what we know. He makes you hate the twins at time because you think how stupid could each of them be but that keeps you reading to see where they go.

None the less its a great series.
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on January 3, 2018
My son Loves Harry Potter, and now he is in love with these books! Great addition to his collection!
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on May 3, 2017
I really enjoyed this tale of the Old West or allegory of the McCarthy era, depending on what you're looking for. Reads like a screenplay for a High Noon or Shane look-alike. Very engaging with archetypal characters drawn from generations of Westerns and American heroic epic literature.
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