Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.99
  • Save: $2.15 (13%)
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Only 12 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
The Way We Do It in Japan has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Good
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

The Way We Do It in Japan Hardcover – January 1, 2002

4.1 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$14.84
$9.49 $4.62

Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for the Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
$14.84 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 12 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • The Way We Do It in Japan
  • +
  • I Live in Tokyo
  • +
  • All About Japan: Stories, Songs, Crafts and More
Total price: $35.42
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Kindergarten-Grade 3--Gregory lives in California with his parents. Suddenly his Japanese-born father announces that he is being transferred to Tokyo and they will be leaving shortly. They pack up and move and Gregory learns that the language, money, food, and traffic flow are all different. Every time he remarks on the strangeness of things, his father says, "That's the way we do it in Japan." The child has the usual fears about going to a new school, understanding the work, and making friends. He feels out of place with his peanut-butter sandwich when everyone else eats the school-supplied fish, rice, and soup. He dislikes the idea of fish, but on the day he decides to try it, they are serving PB & J sandwiches and the children announce, "Amerikawa sugoi" (America is wonderful). Large, colorful illustrations with realistically drawn children add to the appeal of the story. However, some of the "way we do it-" elements are a bit stereotypical of the traditional way of Japanese life. Contemporary children of Gregory's age mostly now sleep in beds and sit at tables, but that does not detract from this story, which tries to emphasize cultural differences while including social similarities. This friendly story of acceptance in a new situation will also serve as a good introduction to children learning about this culture.
Nancy A. Gifford, Schenectady County Public Library, NY
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

Ages 5-8. Gregory lives in San Francisco with his American mother and Japanese father until his father's job takes them all to Japan. Gregory's experiences in his new home and school provide children with an introduction to Japanese customs and lifestyle. More important than the cultural differences, however, is Gregory's positive reaction to the changes. For example, when Gregory's dad tells him that people in Japan sleep on the floor instead of beds, Gregory responds with an enthusiastic, "Wow! That'll be just like camping!" Billin-Frye's engaging watercolors complement the encouraging tone of the text by featuring characters with pleasant facial expressions and body language, and placing Gregory in surroundings that are attractive and will seem familiar to listeners. Numerous Japanese phrases, with pronunciations and translations included, are sprinkled throughout the story. Use this to introduce a unit on Japan or to increase awareness of the Japanese culture. Lauren Peterson
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Age Range: 5 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Kindergarten - 4
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Albert Whitman & Company (January 1, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807578223
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807578223
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 0.4 x 10.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.3 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #308,969 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Lisa Hays on January 14, 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am a director of a childcare center and I am running a multicultural program for our children. It is sooo hard to find good materials for small children that discuss other cultures. This book was excellent. The children loved it and so did I.

It not only taught about the differences but it also had Japanese words strewn throughout the book. It also had a very simplistic pronunciation key so that I didn't need to skip a beat while reading. One of our children who is from Japan and his mother came in while I was reading. The mother understands very little english but was very pleased with the book. The book ends on such a loving note. I wish they had books like this for every culture.

I thank the authors for such a book.
Comment 26 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Gregory moves with his Japanese father and Caucasian mother from San Francisco to Japan. The author captures the boy's eagerness for adventure, yet his timidity as he faces the unknown. While Gregory and the reader learn "the way they do it in Japan," they will learn to speak some Japanese words.
The author has depicted loving parents who do all they can to help their son fit in to a new way of life. The surprise comes in the end when Gregory's classmates learn "the way they do it in America."
A great book to encourage children to value another culture. Adult and child will gain information about Japan that could lead to a whole unit of study. But what I liked best was the author's theme of love and friendship, where there could be fear and alienation. The principles of the book could be applied to the study of any culture.
Comment 22 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
The Way We Do It In Japan is a warm story relating a child's honest and positive reactions to his family's move from
San Francisco to Tokyo, Japan. Gregory's experiences and reactions to new and unfamiliar situations prompted much discussion in my first grade classroom. Every child identified with Gregory on some level. This book was a welcome re-read in my classroom!
Comment 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Annie on February 9, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This book is so cute. We are Americans living in Japan and my daughter has lived here her whole life (since she was a few months old) so she attends Japanese school, is bilingual, and deeply Japanese-cultured. I know she will be culture-shocked when we return to the States in a year and a half, and I thought this book would be a different way to help her with the differences she will experience when we move to the States.

This book is the reverse of what we are doing, but the principals are all the same. She says maybe she should translate this book and read it to her classmates so that they can understand what American children are feeling when they move here (in case they become classmates with future American children). She doesn't yet understand that her bilingualism is the only reason her elementary school accepted her into the school as an American, but I thought her idea was so emphatic and sweet!

Overall, I think this book applies to an array of educational areas. I'll be waiting for more like it!
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is great for the most part but the glaring mistakes make it difficult for me to read. I mean, the pronunciation guide is incorrect about half the time, and "Hidiaki" isn't even a Japanese name. There's no "di" in Japanese. Hideaki is a common name, however. I honestly feel sorry for the author. It looks like she tried to get it proofed by the right people but somebody didn't do their job along the way.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I read this book to my 3 year old this morning, and he sat absolutely still and couldn't take his eyes off the page. We counted to five in Japanese together which was easy to do as the book has Japanese words with a wonderful pronunciation guide scattered throughout the pages.

I highly recommend this wonderful, uplifting story.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
We are moving to Japan and we have a toddler and some of this applies to him but mostly for young school age children. I wish it was longer but this is a good size for that age group. I would enjoy this as a series.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

The Way We Do It in Japan
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: The Way We Do It in Japan