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Weekend [VHS]

3.6 out of 5 stars 48 customer reviews


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Product Details

  • Actors: Mireille Darc, Jean Yanne, Jean-Pierre Kalfon, Karl Marx, Yves Afonso
  • Directors: Jean-Luc Godard
  • Writers: Jean-Luc Godard, Julio Cortázar
  • Format: Color, Subtitled, NTSC
  • Subtitles: English
  • Rated:
    NR
    Not Rated
  • Number of tapes: 1
  • Studio: New Yorker Video
  • VHS Release Date: January 1, 1998
  • Run Time: 105 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (48 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6302149487
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #294,156 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

Jean-Luc Godard and Luis Buñuel enjoyed an ardent misanthropic duel in the '60s and '70s, but who won is anyone's call. Godard's Weekend lays down the trump in a harrowing and darkly funny allegory in which social mores fray along political lines. Played out in a metafilm in which characters question their own reality, a morally bankrupt Parisian couple tries to leave the city on a much-loathed country holiday with the wife's parents. Along the way, endless traffic jams, sudden violence, and vistas of gory car crashes underscore their corrupted values. Their lethal encounter with the in-laws and kidnap by an anarchic band of radical cannibals finds the couple--and presumably "decent" society with them--reverting to a nasty primitivism. The idea is of course that the bored, apathetic heart of the bourgeoisie is never far from acting out its most homicidal fantasies. --Alan E. Rapp

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: VHS Tape
The review on this page which claims that Weekend is one of the worst films ever missed the point and was not apparently, given the reviewer's qualms with the movie, the intended audience for the film.
Weekend marks Godard's nearly-formal break with "bourgeois film-making," i.e., film-making which has as its sole criteria to "entertain" (as in escapism), to engage in linear story-telling, and to reinforce film cliches, formulas, and all the trappings of popular western (and especially American) film-making.
In the movie, the audience witnesses the collapse of the narrative, the disintegration of formal film technique, and--more literally--the degeneration of western civilization. A ten-minute-long traffic jam, the barbarism of pig slaughters and corpses littering the countryside, and the unsympathetic characterizations of the bourgeois couple on whom the film centers (if it does indeed have a center) have not been filmed to entertain, to comfort, or to lull the audience, but to provoke thought, to engage actively, and--quite possibly--to enrage actively as well.
Arriving at a conclusion, being "pretty" or emotional, or arranging details tidily would defeat the purpose of Weekend, which is to illustrate incoherence, savagery, and decline. And, in this regard, perhaps no film has better tampered with the status quo of film-making than Godard's Weekend has.
Also, it must be remembered that Weekend is a reflection, to a great deal, of the turbulence of the sixties, and in particular the student protests in Paris in 1968.
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By A Customer on May 22, 1999
Format: VHS Tape
An utterly brilliant pastiche from Godard. JLG gives us a nightmarish vision of contemporary bourgeois society in which the apocalypse takes on the form of a series of bloody car wrecks and cannibalistic revolutionaries running wild. Even the scenes that don't work, like the bizarre encounter with Emily Bronte and Louis Carroll and the 18th-century French revolutionary reading a political tract, are forgiveable simply because they only add to the anarchic nature of the film. How many other movies have you seen that feature a woman screaming before a horrific car accident because she left her handbag inside, or a speech on Hitlerism and African slavery intercut with clips of traffic jams?
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Format: VHS Tape
With influences ranging from Freud to Marx, De Sade and Eisenstein having walk-on roles and the Parisian weekend transformed into an allegorical bourgeois hell,
Week-End is one of the defining films of the 20th Century. Born out of the nouvelle vague cinema (French New Wave), this is the terrible birth that is brought to light from J.L.Godard's obsession with prophesising the destruction and decline of the West. Even after taking into account his overt political messages, Weekend still exist as one of the most technically revolutionary pieces of cinema to emerge from his studios into a blinding glare of publicity and hostility.
Not content with depicting the destruction of western commercial values, Godard disrupts the visual narrative by interspersing film titles, book titles and music onto a background of patriotic red, white and blue colours. From a personal perspective, one of the most impressive sequences is an eight minute long tracking-shot of the Parisian highway which progresses from straightforward traffic jams to car-wrecks and the inevitable symbol of multinational Capitalism, a Shell oil truck. Essentially Week-End marks the 'Maoist period' of Godard's film-making career, during which he declared that 'the only way to be a revolutionary intellectual is to give up being an intellectual.'
Starring Mireille Darc and Jean Yanne, Week-End's fabular narrative is a weekend journey from Paris to Normandy which slowly becomes an apocalyptic struggle against the French peasant revolutionaries who continually intervene to prevent the couple meeting Darc's mother in order to find out whether they have successfully poisoned her father.
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By A Customer on December 12, 1998
Format: VHS Tape
a brilliant intellect's look at hell on earth -- a gorgeous, daft, two-timing blonde frenchwoman and her cheating bourgeoise husband spend the weekend dodging traffic jams, cannibals, car crashes and left-wing politicos -- a beautiful, bored french miasma. fender-benders and violence shot with typical, hilarious godard cynicism -- a must-see for godard fans -- won't make sense to others. won't make sense either way, but great fun for true believing new wavers.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
"Weekend" (1967) is directed by Jean Luc Godard (Breathless, Pierrot le fou, Le Mepris). This black comedy follows a bourgeois married couple, who both have secret lovers, and who are both planning the others' murder. They set off for her parents' home in the country to secure her inheritance from her dying father. On the way through the picturesque countryside they witness violent car accidents, as well as an assortment of characters, some from literature and history, and others representing the various classes in society. The film is broken up with intertitles that comment on the action as well as on the process of film viewing. Discussions from characters range from notions on identity to class struggle. The two protagonists seem intent on their sole and petty goal of the inheritance despite the fact that most everyone else around them are focused on more grave notions regarding philosophy and the binding relationships between humanity and the disparities between people and their rights and freedoms. This incongruous relationship between the two leads, and those around them, is enhanced by the jarring musical score which often sounds like the dramatic music from a film noire gangster film.

The film also includes some special features, including a commentary by critic David Sterritt, an interview with cinematographer Raoul Coutard, and a Mike Riggis interview about his views on the film.
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