Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item.
Details
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
A West Texas Soapbox (Wes... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Former Library book. Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to over one million happy customers. Your purchase benefits world literacy!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

A West Texas Soapbox (West Texas A&M University Series) Hardcover – April 1, 1998

4.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$22.95
$22.95 $3.86

The Underground Railroad
The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent tour de force chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more
$22.95 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Temporarily out of stock. Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover


Editorial Reviews

Review

“Sanderson is a provocative essayist . . . Sanderson’s anecdotes expose the foibles of college administrators and oil patch trash, students and free-enterprisers, hypocritic zealots and drunks, and they are as instructive as they are entertaining. . . . Though often light-hearted, A West Texas Soapbox is not superficial criticism. It is reasoned, judicious, and, above all downright interesting.”--Jerry Bradley
(Jerry Bradley)

From the Inside Flap

Whether sprawled on barstools or preaching from pulpits, people need to make sense of their world, and in Jim Sanderson's world of West Texas, pulpits and barstools are where many of them do so. Sanderson himself stood for many years at a podium, teaching at a community college in Odessa, Texas. There, tired of academic papers and sometimes losing the distinction between fiction and nonfiction, he turned to the world around him to figure out the meaning (or meanings) of education and of culture itself.

In a series of autobiographical ruminations, Sanderson develops the theme that frontier wildness is still alive, especially in West Texas, though it may be repressed by fundamentalist religion and conservative politics. West Texans, he finds, have to reconcile the two sides of their contrary natures: the farmer, best represented by the fundamental church, and the frontiers-man, best represented by the sleazy bar.

Through this theme of internal conflict, Sanderson weaves his experiences of art and censorship, Texas myths in film and fiction, the interaction of Hispanic culture with the culture of West Texas, contradictions posed by academic interests in vocational teaching institutions, intellectual elitism versus the real world, and West Texas women's definition and self-definition. Through the examples of his students, he shows how the quest for the West Texas myth -- freedom, liberation, and fulfillment -- is always transforming, whether for good or bad.

In the end, he recognizes that his insights may tell more about himself than about West Texas, but by trying to make meaning out of his experience, he tells us something about the way all of us learn and think about ourselves.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Series: West Texas A&M University Series (Book 2)
  • Hardcover: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Texas A&M University Press; 1st edition (April 1, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0890968195
  • ISBN-13: 978-0890968192
  • Product Dimensions: 6.3 x 0.7 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,204,888 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5 star
67%
4 star
33%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I've never been to Odessa, Texas, but Sanderson's essays make the place come alive on the page. It's rare for a book of essays to be a page turning adventure, but he somehow manages to make the reader just want to keep reading. The book feels like a nice, long drive through a place with interesting scenery and plenty of fun stops along the way. I highly recommend this book to anyone who understands the importance of region and of belonging to a place or to anyone who just wants to spend some time in the exotic and wonderful region of West Texas.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I'm taking this book with a grain of salt. Then I'm following that with a glass of water.(Salt always makes me thirsty) Mr. Sandersons book starts with Emerson. Here he adeptly seperates himself from the Sand-dwelling God-fearing, mesquite-huddling creatures of the Odessan West. All sense of 'Self Reliance' present in American cuture has been effectively weeded out in Odessa, replaced with a consuming sense of Jesus and an ill conceived moral sense. Mr. Sanderson by invoking Emerson, distants himself from these maddened desert people, and looks at them with--I hate to say contemp, but these bastards are quiet contemptable. In the end he too has to leave the Odessan west because he has challenged Jesus and the moral baggage he carries. Ironically he heads East towards self introspection, and not westard, the traditional route of Americans seeking the reason and purpose of a questioned life. I think he also sees how easy it would be to fall into the Odessan life, to not think, to only act. In the end to just accept what is presented to you, like so many do.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
well, when i first started this book i was worried, it started out a bit slow, and the early essays were very academic, BUT the later essays were full of humor, sarcasm, cynicism, and wisdom. I know essay collections don't normally sell well, but this is one that you should definately pick up.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse