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asked by Daniel Morgan on July 9, 2008
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A
Hi. I purchased the same lens 2 days ago and yes, I am a novice using a D300. I have the same 'err' reading but when i switch and locked to f/22 i realised that the camera body electronically controls the aperture setting - which you can obviously set in 'A' mode. I assumed that the manual a f adjustment ring on the lens then was only for cameras that do no have electronically controlled A settings via the body.
Ashley Veasey answered on July 15, 2008
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A
You've hit it on the nose Ashely. The D-series by Nikon adjust aperature electronically. When you engage the lock on f/22 on the lense, it is similar as switching on the auto focus. The camera electronically adjusts the aperature of the lens. When you take it off, the camera sees that the lens in not in automatic mode or thinks that there isn something wrong with the lens and gives the error sign. Unless you plan on adjust the aperature manually, which there is few reasons to do, always leave the lens locked at the f/22.
Ty answered on July 26, 2008
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A
On Nikon cameras - "A" stands for Aperature, not automatic. On the "A" setting, you determine the aperature (lens opening) and the camera sets the shutter speed. If you want fully automatic selection of both aperature and shutter speed, use the "P" Program setting. If you get an error message, it means that there is not enough available light to shoot the picture. In that case, either increase your ISO or use a flash.
John A. Fugel answered on February 24, 2009
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A
jeproxx:

If you want to use f/1.8 you need to shoot in manual (M), aperture priority (A), or program mode (P) in low light.

The fastest answer is to put the camera in aperture priority, the "A", then turn the dial until it reads 1.8 on the display or viewfinder. I recommend you read your camera manual or find it online if you want to use this lens to its maximum capability.

I assume you're aware that this lens (1.8D version) does not autofocus with your D5000?
SMR answered on February 7, 2011
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A
Thx for confirming that Ty. I shot some great b&w photos on vacation with my kids in bali this week with this lens. Very sharp.
Ashley Veasey answered on July 26, 2008
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A
I'm having the same problem using this lens on my D80 camera. What you are saying is that there is no way for me to use the ring to adjust the aperture? It only works when locked on 22?? This doesn't seem right.
Krun answered on December 28, 2009
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A
Hi All, very interested in these postings but still can't get this lens to work with my D70 in M or AF. I too get fEE message displayed and shutter won'r fire, even after locking off at f22 etc. Starting to wonder if its a camera setting or am I missing something?
J Gibson answered on November 16, 2010
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A
i have d5000 and everytime i switch to any f-number i got this " lock lens aperture ring at minimum aperture (largest f/-number) " so i always use 22 and then i lock it, but why?! please help me what setting i need for manual or to use 1.8 instead 22. ty for any answer
jeproxx answered on February 4, 2011
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A
J Gibson:
I dropped my old 50mm 1.8D and this is the message I got after that, I had to replace it. It might be a defective or broken lens. I would suggest trying it on another Nikon AF camera and if it still doesn't work hopefully you can return it or have it replaced under warranty.
SMR answered on February 7, 2011
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A
The camera controls the aperture, set it at f22 and forget it. Beside why would you not want the camera to control the aperture. If you switch to A or M mode you can set it to whatever stop you need and the camera will close the aperture down to that setting when the shutter is pressed. On some very old nikon cameras you needed to use the apertue ring and set it at the aperture you wanted, but if you where shooting something at f16, the viewfinder was almost black.
R. Holen answered on January 15, 2010
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