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asked by E. Hoak on October 3, 2008
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Then consider yourself fortunate--you're able to process carbs. But has anyone in your family gained weight as they got older? I'm not talking hugely fat, but maybe ten pounds or so? Taubes writes that the older we get, the less we're able to process the carbs, the dreaded "middle age spread".
Patricia Beninato answered on October 25, 2008
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Jeff Evans answered on November 12, 2008
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This is typical of young people with little insulin resistance. However, high carb/sugar diets that produce higher blood sugar levels increase risk whether you're thin or not (the risk of most diseases associated with diabetes increases by about 30% for every 30 unit increase in blood glucose). And your insulin resistance will only rise as you get older, making weight gain and rising blood sugars more likely. Also note that about 20% of newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics are thin. So it's the blood glucose levels that count.
bgsrule answered on August 28, 2009
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H. Karaki answered on October 16, 2009
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I agree with H. Karaki -- size isn't everything. My (adoptive) mom has been slender her whole life, and is also a carb addict (bread and sweets every day -- the diet that inflated me to over 220 pounds), but has been diabetic since she was in her thirties, and has arthritis, irritable bowel, high blood pressure, and congestive heart failure. All the diseases of civilization, except for obesity.
Rose M. Nunez answered on May 27, 2011
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If your adoptive mom was diabetic since her thirties and was still eating high carbs, she may have been thin because of high sugars. These high sugars also contribute to arthritis (fluid retention), bowel problems due to neuropathy, high blood pressure (fluid), and congestive heart failure (fluid and/or medication caused).
Amazon Customer answered on May 30, 2011
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David Esposito answered on July 7, 2011
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Jodi-Hummingbird answered on July 14, 2011
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A blood glucose meter is cheap, easy to use, and might open the original poster's eyes to surprising BG levels even if you are not overweight. See the recently published book "Sugar Nation," written by a pre-diabetic who is tall and thin (and a writer for various men's health magazines!)

(I realize the OP was made nearly 3 years ago, but still...)
Kathy Grace answered on August 25, 2011
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150 F3 answered on July 17, 2012
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