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When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit Paperback – November 10, 1997

4.5 out of 5 stars 107 customer reviews
Book 1 of 3 in the Anna (Kerr, Judith) Series

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Editorial Reviews

Review

"A compassionate introduction to the whole subject of World War II" - Books for your Children "An extremely exciting adventure story." - Daily Express "A charming and touching book, often very funny" - Daily Mail "Exact, intelligent and unsentimental." - Sunday Telegraph --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Publisher

Anna was only nine years old in 1933, too busy with her school work and friends to take much notice of Adolf Hitler's face glaring out of political posters all over Berlin. Being Jewish, she thought, was just something you were because your parents and grandparents were Jewish. But then one day her father was unaccountably, frighteningly missing. Soon after, she and her brother, Max, were hurried out of Germany by their mother with alarming secrecy.

Reunited in Switzerland, Anna and her family embark on an adventure that would go on for years, in several different countries. They learn many new things: new languages, how to cope with the wildest confusions, and how to be poor. Anna soon discovers that there are special skills to being a refugee. And as long as the family stayed together, that was all that really mattered. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Product Details

  • Age Range: 7 and up
  • Grade Level: 3 - 6
  • Paperback: 191 pages
  • Publisher: Puffin (November 10, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0698115899
  • ISBN-13: 978-0698115897
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 0.5 x 7.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (107 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,346,069 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Anna M. Ligtenberg VINE VOICE on June 30, 2006
Format: Paperback
ISBN 0440490170 - I've always loved books about WWII, because it's a time in history that is so full of stories of endurance and courage. When I picked this one up, I had my doubts about how well this era could be related in a kids' book - and I am so happy to say, it is excellent. The "secrets her parents are keeping" in an earlier review don't exist. They're Jews, they live in Germany and they flee - no secret.

Anna and her family live in Germany as Hitler is coming into power, and her father is one of the lucky ones who knew this was a bad thing before it was too late. On the eve of the elections, her family flees to Zurich and begins a new life as refugees. For Anna and her brother Max, this is an adventure, even if they are sad to leave their home and friends. They believe they will be able to come home in six months, so they are not heartbroken over it. They begin school, make new friends and learn new things - not all of them good - while their parents struggle to make ends meet. Her father, a famous writer, can't get regular work for good money and her mother has to learn to do things for herself and her family that they once hired people do to for them. From Zurich to Paris and eventually to England, Anna's family loses everything they own but learn that all they really need is one another.

There are some hilarious moments, such as when Anna's teacher tells the class that cavemen used safety pins, and some moments of triumph for everyone. Anna's and Max's success with French is a high point, as is their father's selling a screenplay. Without a doubt, the saddest moment isn't when Hitler stole pink rabbit, but when news of Onkel Julius' suicide reaches the family.
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A Kid's Review on April 3, 2005
Format: Paperback
Are you looking for a book that you can't put down, and will want to read again and again? Well, you found it! When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit is so adventurous that you'll want to come back for more! I would, and after you read it, give this book five stars! Maybe even ten stars! And School Library Journal and Booklist agree that this autobiographical novel absorbs your true feelings about this time period.

I'm very pleased with this book because it shows her feelings when things happen to her though out the book. An example would be when she found out she was going to be moving country to country. She felt excited about the whole thing and really wanted to go to Paris, France. This book also tells about the personalities of others. Take her grandmother Omama for an example. The book said Omama never moved without her dachshund Pumpel.

This book can change your point of view of her and her family because of what they go thought all though the book. You'll find out where she moves and what she has to learn to fit in. She will have to learn different languages and customs. And there are new friends in every county that she goes to. Judith Kerr, the author, is so talented that you'll think that you are the book experiencing everything that they go though. Come experience it for yourself!
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Format: Paperback
I first read this book at about age 10 and have since read it numerous times. I have an 8 year old and she is now beginning to read it (with a little help from me). To say the least, this was my favourite book as a youth. It's easy to place yourself in Anna's shoes and dream about what it would have been like to be in a similar plight.
I cannot recommend this book enough for children (male or female) around age 10...especially American youth whose perspective can be opened beyond what most have experienced at this age. There's nothing to offend in the book though a few questions may come up. Other reviewers give you the plot...I will refrain from repeating.
To my delight, I discovered that there are two sequels to the book written by Kerr: Small Person Far Away, The Other Way Round. Guess what two books are next on my reading list?
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Format: Paperback
This is probably the best book I've ever read. It is about a girl named Anna who is forced to fled her country with her family in hopes of not being found by the Nazi's. And it shows the struggles and difficulties that Anna's family had to go through in battle of finding freedom. It is a very compelling story that takes place in World War II. And It will keep you wondering. I read this book when I was in 6th grade and never found it again. I am going to order it and I hope you all do. It is a very good book that teaches the reader about WWII and is still appropreate for the young reader. It is Highly Recommended!
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Format: Paperback
Anna, a nonpracticing Jew living in Germany, is really too young to know what is going on when the Nazi party starts to gain power. All that she knows is that in the year when she is nine years old, things are going badly. Her father, a famous and well-respected writer, is nervous about the upcoming elections. In fact, he is so nervous that he secretly travels to Switzerland to wait them out and then, as the time of the elections draws near, he has Anna, her older brother Max, and their mother join him. They soon find out it was lucky they did--shortly after the election the Nazis came looking for them.

What follows is a young girl's account of being a refugee. Anna's father, who spoke out against Hitler in his writing, finds it hard to get anyone to pay him for his writing, even in neutral Switzerland. From Switzerland the family moves to France, where Anna's father has a bit more success but Anna and her brother have to learn a new language. They feel like they don't really belong anywhere. The family finally decides to make their way to England, where Anna's mother thinks things will be brighter.

I liked the strength of Anna's parents, who made sure their kids always felt safe, even when they must have been terrified. I both liked and disliked that everyone in this story was so positive. It was nice that Anna's family didn't let anything get them down, but it was hard to believe that any family could be that resilient and cheerful. The book made it seem like being on the run from the Nazis was a fine adventure. Since the story focused on people living abroad and getting by fine, it made the Holocaust seem like not such a big deal.
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