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Why Smart People Can Be So Stupid Hardcover – April 1, 2002

4.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

[P]rovides valuable insight into a subject that eludes, but that intrigues as well. -- James A. Crawford, The Harvard Crimson

From the Back Cover

"This book is a serious attempt to understand a common phenomenon. Students of human behavior should find it appealing and may even learn how to avoid doing stupid things."-Psychology Today; "This original book gathers together the best thinking and research on what causes smart people to do foolish things. A highly original work with an exceptional list of contributors."-Martin Ford, George Mason University; "Marvelous, devilishly clever, and culturally timely book. . . . A fascinating exploration. . . . All of the contributions are outstanding."-Choice; --This text refers to the Paperback edition.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Yale University Press; Reprint edition (April 1, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0300090331
  • ISBN-13: 978-0300090338
  • Product Dimensions: 9.6 x 6.5 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,201,885 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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By Anthony R. Dickinson on May 5, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Whether one believes acting stupid to be the antithesis of acting smart or intelligently [most of us?], or perhaps prefers to regard stupid behaviour as foolishness in the face of misplaced wisdom [Sternberg], this volume brings together a rich diversity of approaches and opinion to one of life's persistent questions. Some 15 authors gather here in an attempt to inform the reader what stupidity and smartness consist in, whilst providing a breadth of examples from both the empirical literature (laboratory studies, psychometric survey) and the popular press (typically involving embarrassed politicians). Over the course of some eleven chapters, a number of recurrent themes and proposals address the ways in which stupid behaviour might best be characterised, identified or defined, but of more interest (at least to me) was to also find a number of attempts to explain the behaviours so described. A number of the contributors point (directly or indirectly) to particular instances of `stupidity' which may well have been construed as having demonstrated adaptive, rather than maladaptive behaviour under different circumstances. In this respect, the reader is repeatedly lead to the view that personal trait labels such as smart, intelligent or stupid, should be viewed as context dependant terms, if not entirely context-specific, characterisations of human behaviour. In short, what might be considered stupid behaviour under one circumstance, might well be considered smart behaviour in another. So, why do these authors think that smart people can be so stupid?Read more ›
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Bought the book for my online graduate course. So far really enjoyed reading about managerial incompetence.
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