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Winning the Talent Wars: How to Build a Lean, Flexible, High-Performance Workplace Paperback – April 17, 2002

4.8 out of 5 stars 21 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

Bruce Tulgan is the new Tom Peters. -- Howard Jenkins, chairman and CEO, Publix Super Markets, Inc.

About the Author

Bruce Tulgan is founder and president of RainmakerThinking, Inc., a management training and consulting firm based in New Haven, Connecticut.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 222 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company (April 17, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393323005
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393323009
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 0.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,476,283 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
If any written word can shake corporate America's middle management from its "do it the way it's always been done" stupor, "Winning the Talent Wars" is that word.
Tulgan recognizes the intertwined realities of a new workforce psyche, the technology-driven acceleration of information flow and the intense competition for knowledge resources. Unlike other authors attempting to demystify this subject, Tulgan is not content with a colorful analysis of these forces. He offers a host of innovative "rubber meets the road" techniques that can be applied almost immediately with little or no cost. Tulgan's book is a recipe for change, but the ingredient list within may be too tough for some middle managers to stomach. If you want to be a new economy chef, internalize this book. If you are a burger-flipper, don't even bother.
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Format: Hardcover
Winning the Talent Wars: How to Manage and Compete in the High-tech, High-speed, Knowledge-based, Superfluid Economy is the original hardcover version of Tulgan's workplace classic. His workplace philosophy, "Talent is the Show" is applied to all areas of HR: staffing, compensation, coaching-style management, training, and career paths. The only difference between this book and the recent softcover edition, Winning the Talent Wars: How to Build a Lean, Flexible, High-Performance Workplace, is a new forward and $8.40.
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Format: Hardcover
In Good to Great, Jim Collins and his research associates learned that the great companies "...first got the right people on the bus, the wrong people off the bus, and the right people in the right seats -- and then they figured out where to drive it. The old adage 'People are the most important asset' turned out to be wrong. People are not [italics] your most important asset. The right [italics] people are."
The right people share the same values and, together, sustain their organization's commitment to those values. If involved in their organization's recruiting and interviewing process, as they should be, they will help to ensure that the right people will be hired (i.e. allowed on the "bus"). Obviously it is important to get talent and task in proper alignment. It is equally important to keep an organization's values in proper alignment with its objective.
Tulgan's important book is even more relevant and more valuable now than it was when first published about two years ago. As its subtitle correctly indicates, he explains "how to manage and compete in the high-tech, high-speed, knowledge-based, superfluid economy." That is to say, he wrote the book for decision-makers in all organizations (regardless of size or nature) to help them determine HOW to get "the right people on the bus, the wrong people off the bus, and the right people in the right seats"...and then keep them there.
All of the companies which Tulgan discusses (e.g. Johnson & Johnson and J.P. Morgan Chase) demonstrate one of Tulgan's core concepts: "In the new economy, every term of employment -- schedules, location, assignments, coworkers, pay, and more -- will be negotiation, whether you like it or not. The most valuable talent will have the most negotiating power.
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Format: Hardcover
I really hope that companies sit up and take notice of the kind of work place that Bruce Tulgan describes in his book. All I could think the whole time I was reading it was, why didn't we think of that? As a middle-level manager, the book really spoke to me about the things I can do right now to make the workplace a place where the best people will want to come to work, even though there is a lot of red tape at the corporate level. The biggest obstacle for me would be implementing pay-for- performance compensation (we have a rigid pay structure). But maybe I can divvy up part of my bonuses to reward my people for helping me to reach the goals, or maybe figure bonusus in when requesting resourses for a project or find somewhere in the project's resourses to save the money so that I can put that into bonuses. I don't think anyone will fire me for that! A lot of the other ideas are relatively easy to put into use without much resistance from higher-ups, like trying to be a better coach, building a knowledge database, and keeping in touch with old employees to try to get them to come back for various projects. With any luck, word will get out that my department is better to work for and I'll have the pick of everyone else's litter in the company when it comes to department transfers. This book definately left me feeling empowered and renewed my enthusiasm for managing my team.
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By A Customer on January 24, 2001
Format: Hardcover
My whole career I've experienced managers who didn't care and treated their subordinates like peons. If I knew years ago about free agents like I know now, I would've been in a much better position to make a positive career move. Thanks to the author I now know how to act as a free agent and I intend to market myself in an effective way in the year 2001. Thanks again to Bruce Tulgan for a great book. I highly recommend it.
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Format: Hardcover
The book vividly described the fundamental shift in employer-employee relationship in new economy. This is not something new by now, and concepts like performance-based rewards, knowledge management have been talked a lot already.
But if you did not pay much attention at human resource (HR) matters before, and want to have a general overview of recent HR concepts and practices, this book shall still help you. There are also interesting debates like instrinic vs. extrinsic values.
As an employee, this book can help you to understand better the background of some HR policies. For example, you may understand and get convinced why managers are more accommodating to "talents" demands. It can convince you to be more realistic about the old career ladder model
There are plenty of companies examples.
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