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Wizzard Brew Import

4.4 out of 5 stars 17 customer reviews

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Audio CD, Import, May 30, 2000
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Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. You Can Dance The Rock 'n' Roll
  2. Meet Me At The Jailhouse
  3. Jolly Cup Of Tea
  4. Buffalo Station-Get On Down To Memphis
  5. Gotta Crush(About You)
  6. Wear A Fast Gun


Product Details

  • Audio CD (May 30, 2000)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Msi
  • ASIN: B00002ZZFM
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #932,429 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
In the annals of rock history, little consideration is given to the importance and influence of Wizzard (in the U.S., anyway). In their native Britain they cut a larger figure, but disbanded too quickly to be remembered among the greats. That's too bad, because they belong in the same upper echelon as contemporaries Mott the Hoople, Queen, Roxy Music, King Crimson, and Slade. This album contains traces of the sounds of all of these bands, and vice-versa. I can hear Wizzard influence on their recordings.

In interviews of the era, Bryan Ferry offered high praise for the group - and I think Queen's third album "Sheer Heart Attack" is hugely influenced by this record, which came out a year earlier. Suddenly Queen was recording harder-charging songs with less frippery and overt touches of 1950's rock - all Wizzard hallmarks. Hmmm. There was clearly a lot of cross-pollination going on in England at this time!

Wizzard itself was a rather schizophrenic aggregate, alternating raucous and fast loud rock (this album) with fussed over, Phil Spector-sounding pop singles. The year 1973 was their peak, which saw the release of this and 3 of their 4 biggest hit singles. Multi-instrumentalist (he plays A LOT of different instruments), band leader, and chief songwriter Roy Wood radically departs here from what fans may have expected of his earlier band The Move. This also is different from what followed later, which was his reputedly half-hearted involvement with the first Electric Light Orchestra album. I can't emphasize enough how much this thing rocks, or how loud it is - it's almost punk-ish at times ("Buffalo Station/Get On Down To Memphis" medley), yet isn't above featuring a long King Crimson-like instrumental passage in the middle of the rocking "Meet Me At The Jailhouse".
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Format: Audio CD
I recently picked this album up again, 20 years after I last heard it at art school. I had forgotten how great it is. It's not fine work at all - the arrangements are towering chaotic heaps, with myriad instruments competing for the listener's attention - but then this is the Birmingham Elf at his most unapologetic. Each track is different, but an air of decadent excess pervades throughout. It's hard to describe. The individual musicians are all highly proficient and play like hell, but the conductor seems to have left the room. Roy Wood's Wizzard had several major hits in the UK in the mid 70s, and each was a hilarious joy. Here, he gets serious. 'Meet me at the jailhouse' is what happens when about five separate rock bands get together and drop a lot of acid, but 'Gotta Crush' is Eddie and the Falcons in the embryo. This is the man who went on to give us the world's first reggae bagpipe song ('Going down the road') and one of the major Christmas monsters ('I wish it could be Xmas every day'), but try as he might (and he did) he never surpassed this Herculean effort. Most people will deride Wizzard Brew for its sloppiness and self-indulgence, and that's all true, but to me, it's part of my youth, and still has enough layers of wacky detail to entrance me again many years later.
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Format: Audio CD
This album has got to be the most crazed and manic thing that Roy Wood has ever done. If you only know Wizzard from thier Top 40 hits or "Eddie and The Falcons" then you will not believe this is the same band. This album is all over the place and with each song it seems to get more and more nuttier.One word can perfectly describe this record...NOISY! Roy Wood has created some very starge music before this and after, but this album has a sound to it that I've never quite heard from him before. It has a certain flattened and processed feel to it. There are just layers and layers of noise on this thing. "Meet Me At The Jailhouse" has got to be the most powerful song on this. It sounds like Roy wanted to take up where he ended on The Moves "Brontosaurus". I love this darn crazy album but for some it may be a bit too much to take. This album will certainly beat your ears to death but if you like music that has a certain off-the-wall charm to it, then I think you'll love this.
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Format: MP3 Music
This is a fascinating CD to revisit. Wizzard was Roy Wood's post Electric Light Orchestra Project, and it was released after the success of a couple of singles - "Ball Park Incident" and "See My Baby Jive". These were admittedly "heavy" in some respects, but Wood's in-built pop sensibility showed through nonetheless, and they both ended up high in the charts. In retrospect, there are hints in these two singles of what was to come on the album, but it did nothing to prepare me for the shock when I bought Wizzard Brew in March 1973, lured by the singles and by the splendid cover. In those days buying a record was a fairly big investment, and for me the guilt factor of money not wisely spent soon kicked if I didn't immediately like what I heard.

The opening track "You Can Dance the Rock and Roll" takes us straight away into very hardcore guitar rock territory, and then turns disconcertingly to dissonant free jazz for the second track, "Meet me at the Jail House", with its extended passages for savage saxophones at the opening and closing. After that, another complete contrast: "Jolly Cup of Tea" is a Sousa-like piece for brass band, massed male voices and whistling that might easily have been recorded by the Bonzo Dog Do Dah Band, or the Beatles in "Yellow Submarine" mode. Roy also gets out his 1950s Elvis Presley rock and roll impersonation on "Gotta Crush (About You)" complete with anarchic instrumental interpolations.

The one track I did latch onto at the time was more in Wood's epic melodic style, familiar from the Move and (particularly) ELO.
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