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Customer reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
47
The Wolf of Tebron (The Gates of Heaven Series)
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on October 22, 2017
Good, well told story but lots of editorial issues. Someone should re-edit this- at least for the kindle version. Many additions and omissions of capitals throughout the book but especially the first 20% and the end. (Names and beginnings of sentences not always capitalized and a capital shows up in the middle of a word: conSolidate) It was very distracting and totally broke the flow of reading. I almost put the book aside. And just a little aside-, rabbit leather is way too thin to make boots. They would have shredded in a day or two on snow or sand : ) Most people probably would notice, but it was another distraction for me.
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on August 14, 2013
Joran has the ability to talk to animals, including insects and birds. Early in the book, we learn that he has told his wife to leave him. (He eventually finds out that he did this unjustly, without giving her a chance to defend herself.) He then starts dreaming about her -- she is in a prison of some sort, by the ocean, and he wants to help her, but can't.

The book is well written, with few usage errors, except for one all-too-common one, which is that proper names are often not capitalized. Also, a few words are capitalized in strange places -- iSolation, for example -- for no apparent good reason.

The book clearly shows a Christian world-view, which is fine, but it's sometimes a bit preachy.

Sword fights, monsters, and terrible enchantments are common in fantasy novels. I never thought I'd say this, but this book doesn't have enough of this type of action. The action is either in telepathic dialogues between Joran and the wolf of the title (who turns out to be his father) or actual conversations between Joran and some of the other characters, or in dreams, and neither the reader, or Joran, is ever sure whether events are really taking place, or whether he is dreaming them. The non-Joran sides of the dialogues are sometimes quotations, or paraphrases, of the Bible. Some of the dialogues mention 20th century concepts, and there are apparently books from the 20th, maybe 21st century, in the house of the sun, where Joran spends quite a bit of time, or seems to. However, most of the setting seems to be the standard medieval-type setting of fantasy stories -- no gunpowder, no internal combustion, no electricity.

On the positive side, Joran stands in for me, and other readers. He is flawed, and comes to know it, and eventually asks for forgiveness.

I'm not sure whether I want to go through a second volume like this. Perhaps the second book is better.
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VINE VOICEon February 9, 2011
I've never been a fan of fantasy with the (major) exceptions of "The Chronicles of Narnia" by C.S. Lewis and "The Hobbit" and "The Lord of the Rings" by J.R.R. Tolkien. And then I met the writing of C.S. Lakin.

In "The Wolf of Tebron," Joran, a young blacksmith with a history he's unaware of, sees his wife Charris in the close and mutual embrace of a neighbor. He's so angry that he sends her away, back to her family in another town.

She never arrives. Then Joran's nightmares begin, haunting his sleep with images of Charris trapped behind a window of ice. And then an odd local resident called the Goose Woman tells him he's trapped his wife in a dream, and three keys must be unloosed to free her. But time is running out.

Joran, alone of his family, has the ability to speak (or mind-speak) to animals. As he struggles with whether or not to believe the Goose Woman, he meets a wolf named Ruyar whose paw is caught in a trap. Ruyar will accompany Joran on the quest to save Charris.

What follows is an extraordinary journey to the House of the Moon, the Palace of the Sun and the cave of the South Wind. The journey becomes a kind of pilgrim's progress, as Joran learns from each new experience and from the direct teaching of Ruyar and his "wisdom of the wolves."

To say more would give the story away, and it's simply too good to be spoiled like that. But it reads so right, so true, that the reader eventually comes to understand that this is a story of both salvation and redemption for all of the characters. It is not only Charris who needs rescue.

"The Wolf of Tebron" is a wonderful story, richly imagined within a world that is both recognizable and yet otherworldly. It can be read by adults, by young adults, and even to older children. Lakin has created a fascinating story, and she just might turn me into a fan of fairy tales after all.
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on January 12, 2012
Although this is book one of the Gates of Heaven series, it is the third one I've read. This series is nice, in that you do not have to read them in the order they were release. Although, having read book two when Joran, our young blacksmith, returns a horse to Jareth, I perked up as he is one of the characters in book two. But he is merely mentioned and it doesn't affect either story.

Once again as I read a fairy tale by this author I find myself transported into a land where a young man can mindspeak with animals. And although he was picked on his entire life he met a beautiful woman who became his wife. Joran's wife, Charris, is away visiting family and Joran is troubled by nightmares. Joran soon learns his wife never arrived at her destination and he must begin a search to find her and the source of his nightmare. Early in his journey he encourages a wolf who is caught in a trap. He rescues the wolf, thus indebting the wolf to Joran as a traveling companion.

This story is imaginative, especially with Joran's ability to mindspeak with animals. I found myself falling in love with the wolf who goes by the name Ruyah. His wisdom and sense of humor is both thought provoking and entertaining. This story also has some very touching moments that I found myself crying. Joran's journey to rescue his wife is a journey many of us travel where we explore our hearts and learn how God wants us to live. But remember it is a fairy tale through and through.

If you have the opportunity to read any of this series by C.S. Lakin, I would encourage to read one. The author does a wonderful job painting pictures the places Joran and Ruyah travel. Her writing style flows nicely.

Disclaimer: The ebook that I actually read did come from the publisher, but before that I did purchase a copy of this book so I could read it.
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on March 31, 2014
This is a beautifully, well written story of a man's enduring love for his wife, and the willingness to find her despite the mortal dangers in his path.

The Wolf of Tebron is a fantasy fairy tale that questions assumptions of truth, and self-discovery. "What you see may not be true." The tale is also the struggle to undo one's wrong. Joran believes that his wife has been unfaithful and sends her away in a fit of rage. In a troubling dream, Joran sees his wife Charris encased in ice in a glass palace, as she stares at him helplessly. When he awakens in his barn, the reality of the nightmare tears at his flesh and whole being. Night after night this horror troubles his sleep.

Joran then goes far away on a quest to unknown lands to find Charris, and in the process learns hard truths about himself. A magnificent and towering silver wolf called Ruyah, and a tiny frych bird travel alongside to help and protect him on his trek. Both Ruyah and frych communicate with Joran through thought, a mind-reading that Joran alone can do.

Joran begins to encounter obstacles the first day he leaves to find Charris. When he runs into an old woman who tells him he has chased his wife away, she tells him of the three keys that can unlock his dreams in order to find her. He dismisses the old woman's warning and calls her crazy. She tells him, "You must save her before the sand slips through the glass." She urges him to hurry, that little time is left to find her. Otherwise she would be lost to him forever.

A most enjoyable story with characters that lingered in my mind long after I finished reading it.
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on May 16, 2013
As I read through the journey of Joran and his quest to save his wife, I was intrigued by the many moral lessons he learned along the way. All throughout the book I felt connected to this character, remembering some of the same revelations about my behaviors and attitudes in my own life. Each chapter was thought provoking, causing me to wonder how I would react in a similar situation.

The use of such colorful characters as the wise wolf, the comical moon's sister, etc. really draw the reader in. The detailed descriptions paint a vivid picture of the scenes as they play out, along with the surroundings. I could actually see through Joran's eyes in my mind. There are moments when I felt the anxiety, fear and frustrations that made my heart pound, but then quickly turned to laughter at the characters antics. C.S. Lakin did a fine job in the creation of her characters, the richness of details, and weaving the storyline together.

There were a few editing errors, mostly typos or misspellings, but the story was so entertaining that the errors were ignored. All in all, I really enjoyed this book, and I plan to read more of C.S. Lakin's work.
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on September 9, 2017
I'm going to try to read the whole series!
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on August 9, 2013
Suspense and provocative insights into bent attitudes and relationships, set in a mysterious dreamworld where anything might happen. But a bit too far-fetched for me.
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on February 1, 2013
I happened upon Mrs. Lakin on Twitter of all places. I read a review she had posted of this book. I wound up purchasing the book for my Kindle reader on iPad. It did take me a moment to delve headlong into the story, but I quickly related to the characters. It is very well-written and captured my attention, while holding me throughout. There is great character development, as well as great allegories. I've consequently purchased and read the entire series in order.
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on January 27, 2016
This is a great book that is filled with imagination and keeps the reader on edge. Characterization is excellent and you won't want to put it down.
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