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Women of Belize: Gender and Change in Central America Hardcover – August 1, 1996

3.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Insightful and inspiring." -- O. Nigel Bolland, Colgate University

"McClaurin has sensitively enable three Belizean women to speak frankly about their difficult lives..." -- Zee Edgell, author of Beka Lamb

"Provides a vivid and evocative portrait of the dynamics of gender and of the evolution of women's consciousness..." -- Daphne Patai, author of Brazilian Women Speak: Contemporary Life Stories --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From the Back Cover

This engaging ethnography is set in the remote district of Toledo in Belize, Central America, where three women weave personal stories about the events in their lives. Each describes her experiences of motherhood, marriage, family lives, emigration, separation, work, or domestic violence that led her to recognize gender inequality and then to do something about it. All three challenge the culture of gender at home and in the larger community. Zola, an East Indian woman without primary school education, invents her own escape from a life of subordination by securing land, then marries the man she's lived with since the age of fourteen-but on her terms. Evelyn, a thirty-nine-year old Creole woman, has raised eight children virtually alone, yet she remains married "out of habit." A keen entrepreneur, she has run a restaurant, a store, and a sewing business, and she now owns a mini-mart attached to her home. Rose, a Garifuna woman, is a mother of two whose husband left when se would not accept his extra-marital affairs. While she ekes out a survival in the informal economy, she gets spiritual comfort from her religious beliefs, lover of music, and two children. The voices of these ordinary Belizean women fill the pages of this book. Irma McClaurin reveals the historical circumstances, cultural beliefs, and institutional structures that have rendered women in Belize socially disenfranchised and economically dependent upon men. She shows how some ordinary women, through their participation in women's grassroots groups, have found the courage to change their lives. Drawing upon her own experiences as a black woman in the United States, and relying upon cross-cultural data about the Caribbean and Latin America, she explains the specific way gender is constructed in Belize. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Rutgers University Press (August 1, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0813523079
  • ISBN-13: 978-0813523071
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6.5 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,937,145 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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By A Customer on July 18, 2000
Format: Paperback
Women of Belize is an interesting ethnography about a population that is normally not reported about. The author, Irma McClaurin, attempts to tell the story of three Belize women, each coming from different walks of life. McClaurin tells each womens story from their perspective and captures the lives they live- facing such issues as divorce, relationship with males, ownership of property, marriage, domestic violence, and most importantly how they, as women, factor into each of these issues. McClaurin does a wonderful job of telling the story of these women, yet from an anthropological/social science perspective she does not report on the consistency of her research methodology nor the ethics behind her research (example: how forming bonds with the women may have driven the results). A very interesting book for people interested in the Caribbeans, women's studies, or cultural anthropology.
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Format: Paperback
This book describes a case study of three Belizian women as well as women's groups from the early 1990's. All of the women are from Lemongrass, Belize, but each of the women are from a different ethnic group. The author interviews each woman and puts each in an anthropological/women studies context. It's not a page turner, but it's interesting, and most of her conclusions seem valid (though interviewing a few more women would be nice). Also, I'm uncertain how correct it is now that thirty years have past.
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