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Women in Slavery: Selections from her Journal of Residence on a Georgian Plantation, 1838-1839 by [Kemble, Frances Anne]
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Women in Slavery: Selections from her Journal of Residence on a Georgian Plantation, 1838-1839 Kindle Edition

3.9 out of 5 stars 29 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • File Size: 572 KB
  • Print Length: 44 pages
  • Publisher: Now and Then Reader (April 17, 2012)
  • Publication Date: April 17, 2012
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B007V9VQ3I
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #199,430 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

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An educated woman of her time she saw the injustices of her situation and although she could do little to change the culture, she was able to alleviate some of the misery of individuals for a short time only. Having been extricated from this evil she intended to speak out in what ever way possible once she was in a position to do so. It changed nothing at that time but she was one of the first to corroborate descriptions in the book "Uncle Tom's Cabin". In today's climate it would have been a sensational Documentary if not a great expose in a Northern Paper of the time. With an intelligent style of writing I was able to understand the inner conflicts it brought her. Her courage in confronting some of the Taboos, was commendable.
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The accounts of the women that this lady helped is heartbreaking and a terrible crime that it even existed. Due to the time this happened white plantation women had little power to change the treatment of women slaves. You can't imagine what it must have been like to be a black slave women and survive grueling labor, continually pregnant, having few of the children you love survive, and not given time to recover after delivery before going back to hard labor. Well documented.
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No one but someone who kept regular notes and a keen eye can record history as it is taking place. I wonder what became of the slaves, the women,and the unfeeling overseers and owners written about. I am sure I would have done anything to escape the horrors.
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This published personal journal is a time capsule of the social mores of the ante bellum Old South. A fine emetic for those prone to romanticizing the Confederacy, this book lays bare the mores of "designing and ambitious men". Written in 1837-1839 during the period that the Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women - an abolitionist organization north of the Mason-Dixon line - held its three annual sessions, this personal journal remained unpublished until after Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation went into effect in 1863. "Women in Slavery" is a well-written, astute, primary source penned by the highly educated English wife of a Georgia plantation owner. She observes:

"Mr. --- lays great stress, as a proof of the natural inferiority of the blacks, on the little comparative progress they have made in those States where they enjoy their freedom, and the fact that, whatever quickness of parts they may exhibit while very young, on attaining maturity they invariably sink again into inferiority, or at least mediocrity, and indolence. But surely there are other causes to account for this besides natural deficiency, which must, I think, be obvious to any unprejudiced person observing the condition of the free blacks in your Northern communities.
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This is records from a southern white woman trapped in a marriage and a situation she wanted hated. She witness some of the horrible treatment of the slaves on her husband's plantation. She lost respect for the man she married. She tried to help the women get better care. Stupidity of the men who wanted to breed more slaves however they kept food, clean conditions, clothing and medical help from both the woman and their children. Many babies and young children died from negligent care and unhealthy living. Woman suffered from the physical abuse of having to work long hard hours in the fields during pregnancies and be told the were malingering after giving birth. Many had infections and other health problems that could have been prevented or cured. The wife eventually just had to leave. The struggle with her husband who backed the overseer over the conditions and treatment of the slaves became fruitless and unbearable. I would have liked to actually read her diary rather than just excerpts.
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I gives such insight on what life was about back in the days of slavery and the suffering of innocent people. There has been such evil in the world since Adam & Eve that it is hard to imagine living in those days.
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I can't imagine being an outsider to this Sothern institution, being married to one who perpetuates it and having to daily live with it. This provides an outsider's view and provides, yet anpther perspective on this shameful institution that was tolerated by this nation.
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This is a strange book. I'm not so sure it is historically accurate. Frances Anne Kemble was anti-slavery so why she married a man who owned slaves is beyond me. I am wondering if it wasn't to get fodder for this "journal". It sounds a lot like Uncle Tom's Cabin. I'm sure things happened similar as to what Frances Anne Kemble writes about - but whether they happened to her - that is the question.
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