Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Woodrow Wilson: A Psychological Study (American Presidents (Transaction Paperback))

5.0 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0765804266
ISBN-10: 0765804263
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$21.94 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
Buy new On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$35.95 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
More Buying Choices
17 New from $34.87 14 Used from $21.94
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for the Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
$35.95 FREE Shipping. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Sigmund Freud (1856–1939), Austrian-born psychiatrist and pioneering founder of psychoanalysis, wrote several significant works, among them The Interpretation of Dreams, The Psychopathology of Everyday Life, and The Ego and the Id.



William C. Bullitt served as the United States' first Ambassador to the Soviet Union from 1933-1936, and as Ambassador to France from 1936-1940. During the Second World War, Bullitt served as a "roving ambassador" for President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Bullitt coauthored, with Sigmund Freud, a biography of Woodrow Wilson, available from Transaction.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Series: American Presidents (Transaction Paperback)
  • Paperback: 307 pages
  • Publisher: Transaction Publishers (April 1, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0765804263
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765804266
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,530,095 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5 star
100%
4 star
0%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The two disillusioned co-authors excoriate Pres. Wilson for betraying Europe through his interference with the natural course of World War I. Using second-hand and circumstantial armchair psychoanalysis, which they caution is a poor substitute for probing personal interviews, they ascribe the messianic megalomania Wilson displayed during the war to his veneration towards his father, a good-looking utopian clergyman of Scots-Irish heritage who specialized in oratory.

As an alternative to a Presbyterian minister like his father and other relatives, the younger Wilson aimed to become an idealistic "Christian statesman" in the manner of his other boyhood hero, British Prime Minister Gladstone. In this, Wilson resembled his predecessor as Party standard-bearer, William Jennings Bryan. Wilson admired the British Parliamentary cabinet form of government over the U.S. Constitutional form. He was happiest when delivering speeches and formulating regulations for debating societies. Infatuated by a visit to the romantic undeveloped landscape of the English Lake and Peak District, he was contemptuous of Continental Europe, and oblivious to its politics, foreign affairs, and geography. He initially despised the individualistic Thomas Jefferson, who had a grudge against the English, hated cities, and mistrusted both Calvinist absolute certitude and the concentrated activist government which it sanctified. The self-righteous Wilson was prone to becoming disappointed with even his most trusted associates upon encountering any disagreement.

Now that he had imposed his vision upon Princeton University, New Jersey, and the USA, it was time to export his crusade to a supposedly subdued and tractable Europe and the rest of the world.
Read more ›
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book reads not so much like a psychoanalysis as like a settling of scores. Freud, as an Austrian, felt betrayed by Wilson's retreat from his Fourteen Points at Versailles; Bullitt, later Ambassador to Russia and instrumental in rescuing Freud from Vienna at the start of Nazi rule there, was a minor member of the American delegation to Versailles and resigned scandalously from it when Wilson ignored diplomatic overtures from Lenin. Their disappointment in Wilson spills over into unforgiving near-hatred, yet the book is well-argued and clearly-written enough to be well worth reading.
The book opens with a profile of Wilson's childhood, his hero-worshipping relationship with his father, and his much more uncertain relationship with the younger brother who was born when Wilson was 10. The authors repeatedly state that Wilson was "ugly": well, ugly is as ugly does, and it's not clear that this was a major issue for Wilson himself, although he was somewhat sensitive about his appearance. This is followed by a somewhat eccentric explanation of basic Freudian tenets. I'm not very familiar with Freudianism, but the strangely hydraulic talk about five outlets for the libido sounded very odd. However, it can be accepted as explaining the governing terms of the analysis to follow, rather than necessarily as a scientific description.
Wilson had a habit of making extremely close friends -- Hibben at Princeton, House and (to a lesser extent) Tumulty in politics -- and then irrevocably breaking with them following differences in policy. (Cary Grayson, Wilson's doctor for the last twelve years of his life, tells a heartbreaking story of a misunderstanding when Wilson returned to Princeton on a visit, that led to Hibben, face glowing, standing in front of Wilson saying "I believe you sent for me?
Read more ›
1 Comment 19 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
When something is exactly as advertised and arrives as promised it deserves a high rating. It was interesting to have this perspective on Wilson. He was not a well person.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Sigmund Freud and William C. Bullitt produced a psychological study called THOMAS WOODROW WILSON, but they couldn't call it a psychoanalytical examination because they could not get Wilson, who died in 1924, to submit to the kind of personal investigation that would confirm the factors of his inner life. We all have good reason to fear (it was almost four years ago when I signed a release to allow the Secret Seervice to have a copy of my psychiatric file to see how dangerous I was) what judgments psychiatrists could use to render our souls, and the history of psychiatry shows that politicians are not the first to have reason to complain. THE FREUD/JUNG LETTERS, Edited by William McGuire, allows us to go way back to 18 December 1912, when Jung wrote to Freud, "I would, however, point out that your technique of treating your pupils like patients is a blunder. In that way you produce either slavish sons or impudent puppies" (Freud/Jung, p. 534). Freud was quite capable, however, of treating the whole world like patients, and with the assistance of William C. Bullitt, who had known Wilson and wanted to write about him, had produced a final draft of this book in 1932.
Those were raw times, and the final text was not settled until Freud and Bullitt met in London in 1939. Religion was a major factor in Wilson's early life, and its benefits are considered "well suited to women and to men whose femininity exceeded their masculinity. . . . A more masculine boy than Tommy Wilson would have felt hostility to the `mores' of the family and community in which the Minister's son was reared; but he felt no impulse to revolt. His masculinity was feeble. . . .
Read more ›
3 Comments 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Woodrow Wilson: A Psychological Study (American Presidents (Transaction Paperback))
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Woodrow Wilson: A Psychological Study (American Presidents (Transaction Paperback))
Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: andrew jackson biography, u.s. presidents