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Work and Community in the Jungle: Chicago's Packinghouse Workers, 1894-1922 (Working Class in American History)

4.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0252061363
ISBN-10: 0252061365
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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Barrett's book on the Chicago packinghouse workers revises in important ways our notions about how class formation took place among immigrant industrial workers. It is a fine examples of the innovative work currently underway on the social history of American labor."--David Brody, author of Workers in Industrial America: Essays on the Twentieth-Century Struggle
 
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About the Author

James R. Barrett is a member of the history department at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. A co-author of Steve Nelson, American Radical, he is also the editor of an annotated edition of Upton Sinclair's novel, The Jungle forthcoming from the University of Illinois Press.
 
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Product Details

  • Series: Working Class in American History
  • Paperback: 328 pages
  • Publisher: University of Illinois Press (January 18, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0252061365
  • ISBN-13: 978-0252061363
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.9 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #900,093 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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VERY GOOD BOOK!!!!!! If you are from Chicago or not, read this book about the beginning of slaughter houses and the Chicago slums and how they evolved. The workers at these slaughter houses sometimes lost a finger cutting meat, but they had to keep going so they just ground the finger up in the meat!
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Format: Paperback
This is an fairly engaging non-fiction rewrite of Upton Sinclair's The Jungle, the socialist tract that inspired the Pure Food and Drug Act in 1906.. It attempts to provide additional insight, or at least the appearance of additional insight, with some statistics and a few new hard facts, but otherwise it contributes nothing actually new. It has long been a clever strategy by some historians to take an acclaimed book from the past and recreate it in a more modern form. Barrett does that here with some success, if not with much originality.
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