Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$8.10
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: It has crisp pages, a tight binding. The Dust Jacket has minor wear, but otherwise the book is excellent--with no writing or highlighting at all. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to Thousands of happy customers. FAST SHIPPING! Ships direct from Amazon. Free shipping on orders over $35! And Free 2nd day shipping on orders over $49! Tracking number and Amazon customer service provided with every order.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

And The World Closed Its Doors: The Story Of One Family Abandoned To The Holocaust Hardcover – International Edition, May 6, 2003

4.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover, International Edition
"Please retry"
$29.86 $0.01

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and more. Read it now
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Max Schohl's family, including his wife and two teenage daughters, fled Germany for Yugoslavia in 1940. As a Jew, Max was no longer permitted to live and work in his own country. In 1942, Schohl was deported to Auschwitz, where he died the following year. His wife and daughters were sent back to Germany to work as slave laborers. They survived and finally were able to emigrate to the U.S. after World War II. Schohl's youngest daughter, Kathe, now 79 and living in Charleston, West Virginia, provided Large with letters and other documents chronicling the family's efforts to escape. Much of the book is in the form of letters, many of them between Max Schohl and Rudolf Hess. Large describes Germany in the 1920s and 1930s by saying "What I try to do in this narrative is to attach a specific human face and voice to the otherwise bloodless record of political calculations and bureaucratic regulations." More clearly than many other books, Large's account depicts the tragic abandonment of the Jews by Western nations. George Cohen
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Review

"More clearly than many other books, Large's account depicts the tragic abandonment of the Jews by Western Nations." --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Basic Books; export ed edition (May 4, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0465038085
  • ISBN-13: 978-0465038084
  • Product Dimensions: 9.6 x 6.4 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,213,266 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5 star
75%
4 star
25%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By Howard J. De Nike on August 25, 2004
Format: Hardcover
And the World Closed Its Doors

The Story of One Family Abandoned to the Holocaust

By David Clay Large

BASIC BOOKS; 278 PAGES; $26.00

Reviewed by Howard J. De Nike

There is irony in Leopold von Ranke furnishing the template for "And the World Closed Its Doors: The Story of One Family Abandoned to the Holocaust," by David Clay Large. Ranke, the great 19th Century German historiographer, inaugurated a scientific approach to history, insisting upon contemporary, firsthand sources. Large, a history professor at Montana State University and part-time San Francisco resident, takes this dictum to heart.

Ranke's exhortation prefigures the modern canons of "social history." Exploiting personal letters, family albums, diaries, census records, polling tallies, and the like, a diligent researcher will be able to piece together an accurate narrative, one ultimately more trustworthy than offered by after-the-fact, self-anointed chroniclers.

Large, whose previous work includes a definitive book on Berlin (2000) and a volume (co-authored with Felix Gilbert), that in its fifth edition is reputedly the greatest selling 20th Century European history text, takes advantage of a trove of letters exposing the increasingly despairing efforts by a German Jew, Max Schohl, to extricate himself and his family from the looming debacle.

In 1938, Schohl opened correspondence with Julius Hess, a cousin he had never met, in Charlestown, West Virginia. The objective was to enlist his relative's aid in emigrating to the U.S. Instead Max suffered a continuum of frustration owed to FDR's documented pre-war policy denying desperately sought asylum to the bulk of Europe's Jews.
Read more ›
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
This book drew me in like a moth to light. The story is told in gripping, personal letters with David Large's excellent historical commentary. And the World Closed Its Doors tells a unique story of the Holocaust from the direct view of the persecuted, not in "period" monochrome facts (as are many WWII diaries), but in heart-wrenching detail, thanks to the family's personal correspondence. For WWII period buffs, this is aunique personal look at the suffering which took place in just one of millions of families. Large has done a great thing in writing this book. I'v read many books on WWII Nazi Germany, and this is by far the most focused and personal. It is a book about the greatest generation under extreme duress, German Jew style.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Kaethe ("Katy") Schohl Wells, 91, passed away Thursday, December 25, 2014.

She was born in Florsheim, Germany on April 19, 1923, to Dr. Max and Liesel Schohl. Katy and her sister, Hela spent an idyllic childhood studying and swimming along the Main River. When the Nazis came to power, Katy's family struggled to find refuge, as Katy's father was sent to Auschwitz and the surviving family members to a slave labor camp. After liberation, Katy immigrated to the United States, where cousins in Charleston, W.Va., welcomed her into their home.

Shortafter arriving in Charleston, Katy met and married the late Herman Wells, with whom she raised two children. For 66 years, the Charleston community embraced her. She made lifelong friends and was active in Temple Israel's Sisterhood. Katy brought joy to her family and friends through lively humor, a love of music, and fruit kuchens.

When letters documenting the Schohls' efforts to escape Germany were printed in a 1997 New York Times Magazine cover story, "Dear Cousin Julius," and the 2004 book, And the World Closed Its Doors, Katy began publicly speaking about the Holocaust and tolerance. With the help of her dear friend, Barry Warhoftig, Katy educated audiences at universities, churches, synagogues, civic groups and high schools. She found great meaning in her conversations with students and community members across West Virginia and Ohio.

Katy is survived by her children, Clara Wells of Tampa, Fla. and Dr. P.J. (Fran) Wells of Canton, Ohio; two granddaughters, Dr. Katie Wells (Michael Satin) of Washington, D.C. and Jennifer Wells (Gabe Culberg) of New York, N.Y.; great-grandson, Isaac Wells Satin; sister-in-law, Gloria M. Wells of Cincinnati, Ohio; and several nieces and nephews.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
My life is forever changed after reading this book. The love and dedication this family had to each other for survival was inspirational.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse