Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The World Is Not Enough Mass Market Paperback – October 1, 1999

4.0 out of 5 stars 33 customer reviews
Book 38 of 45 in the James Bond 007 Series

See all 15 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$2.00 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$7.00
--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Featured Titles in Fiction
Beloved
Beloved
Beloved
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

Review

Welcome back, Mr Bond. We've been waiting for you ... Benson has gone back to Bondian basics in a fast-moving world of bedrooms, firm breasts, betting and bruises.' -- Independent on Sunday 'Spectacular chases, gory killings and a spot of sado-masochism . . addicts of the genre will love it.' -- The Times --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Raymond Benson is the author of The Facts of Death, Zero Minus Ten, High Time to Kill and Doubleshot, as well as the novelizations of Tomorrow Never Dies and The World Is Not Enough. His first book, The James Bond Bedside Companion, was nominated for an Edgar Allan Poe Award for Best Biographical/Critical work. A director of the Ian Fleming Foundation, Benson lives and works in the Chicago area.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 247 pages
  • Publisher: Berkley (October 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 042517350X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0425173503
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.7 x 6.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,434,480 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
I am on record as trashing High Time to Kill (see reviews for that book) along with vowing to wait for the Benson novels in paperback (if not used papaerback). Well, I bought this paperback new and would have paid for a hard cover of this story's quality. Benson is terrific on this novelization. I'm sure there is a lot of extra info that will clarify parts of the movie when I see it. The rumored "airhead" personality of Christmas Jones does not come through in the book and I was afraid that the return to "sexpot" Bond girls would send the modernized Bond into a tailspin. One especially bright point is the meatier role for M. I think Benson likes writing her and it shows. For fans who haven't followed every plot point posted on the web, I'm sure there will be more than a few surprises. The plot-Bond is assigned to bodyguard Elektra King, the daughter of a recently-assassinated oil magnate. Elektra has already been the target of kidnappers led by the villainous Renard, a terrorist who has no pain center. (Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think a "painless" killer was written into the Tomorrow Never Dies plot, but was scrapped after the novelizatioon had already been written) Great gadgets, great plot, great girls,a surprise development with M, and an atomic bomb stolen from a foremer Soviet Republic make for an exciting and riveting thriller.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Based on the new James Bond film, Raymond Benson takes up on Bond once again. This time, the story really stays pretty straight with the movie, only providing a bit more than the film. It contains some background information of Elektra/Renard, and what happens in the past, etc., but it isn't too much. Unlike Tomorrow Never Dies:A Novel, TWINE is not adding much to the film. Basically, if you saw the film and you are a little wishy-washy on reading a Bond book or having to read the what you saw on film, you probably don't need to buy this. However, if you're an avid Bond fan or would still want to take up on a Bond book, it's still a good read. If you see the movie first, it becomes easier to imagine the scenes. Raymond Benson has written better Bond novels than this, however, so make your choice more warily.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
First of all, let us be clear on what this is: it is merely a prose adaption to the Purvis and Wade screenplay. However, this does not excuse Mr. Benson's bland, cliche-riddled style, nor does it excuse the utter lack of energy which permeates the work about a third of the way through.
Mr. Benson has written three previous Bond novels of his own design: ZERO MINUS TEN, THE FACTS OF DEATH, HIGH TIME TO KILL. And, while none of them tops Fleming at his best (FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE, YOU ONLY LIVE TWICE) or Deighton at his worst (CATCH A FALLING SPY, THE BILLION DOLLAR BRAIN), they nonetheless manage to be breezy, entertaining espionage fantasies, as much fun as nineties pulp fiction can be. Unfortunately, when he writes novelizations, Mr. Benson seems to lose that sense of fun. Action pieces that should be energetic and high powered become flat and labored, romance becomes silly, and locations lose their exotic flavor.
The only time the TWINE novelization comes to life is in the opening sequence, in which Bond escapes from a sniper attack in Bilbao and chases a female bomber along the Thames. The setup, too, is intriguing, especially the briefing that occurs in Thane Castle (complete with holographic displays).
From there, the book quickly runs out of gas. The imagination that went into the first act suddenly disappears, turning the entire effort into a Defuse the Bomb scenario.
The Q scene is ludicrous. The locations are threadbare and lack the gloss of previous outings. The villain's plot to irradiate the oil fields of the Caspian Sea meets with little more than a shrug. (Does it really matter who's controlling the world's oil supply?) And the less said of Dr. Christmas Jones, the better.
I can only partly blame Mr. Benson.
Read more ›
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Most movie novelizations seem like they are written for children or for die-hard fans of the film only. And this entry is no exception. Raymond Benson is a lousy writer of the regular Bond novels, and his novelizations are far worse since to begin with, they are novelizations. It's a shame really, because Christopher Wood and John Gardner actually rose above the standard movie tie-in book with their own novelizations of earlier Bonds. But Benson is an out and out hack. (Somewhere in Tomorrow Never Dies he actually writes a sentence like, "The car was completely destroyed.") I would recommend this book only to die-hard Bond fans that buy all of the books. Otherwise keep away from and from any book by Raymond Benson. He is destroying the Bond literary franchise with inferior product. His writing is FAR worse than anything John Gardner ever penned.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on November 15, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I approached this novelization of a Bond film from a "literary" standpoint: I haven't yet seen the new film "The World Is Not Enough", so I read the novel as a novel, without any visual references--memories--of the film. Unfortunately, the non-novelist Raymond Benson offers us another bland effort. This alleged novel self-destructs in many ways. Foremost is the novel's lack of suspense: the narrative stays on one level; and Benson's description of action scenes are awkward. (He still can't describe a series of quick moments and therefore resorts to boring explanations: "It all happened in six seconds" (11), he tells us in the fight scene in Lachaise's office.)
Added to this mess is Benson's tone of voice. We sense, as we do in his previous 007 efforts, that he's nervous about writing a Bond novel. As a result, he lacks the confident, booming authorial voice of a seasoned novelist. Oh, he does try to convince us that he knows what he's doing: he struggles to add background material to some characters, but he pours the information all at once. Take, for instance, the villain Renard: the background of the character appears late in the novel, taking up almost an entire chapter and, consequently, disrupts the main narrative. To make matters worse, we learn nothing new about our man Bond. He's so bland that he is nothing more than nine letters on a page that comprise the name "James Bond."
And let us not forget the laughable travelogue narrative. Benson's description of cities and places is more suitable for an elementary school geography book, not a spy thriller.
Read more ›
Comment 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews