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A World Transformed Audio, Cassette – Abridged, Audiobook

4.3 out of 5 stars 28 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Former U.S. president George Bush sounds relaxed and reinvigorated as he recounts the major events of the first two years of his presidency, 1989-1991. Those were remarkable times, encompassing the end of Soviet hegemony in Eastern Europe and the Gulf War, and his voice captures his own wonder that they happened on his watch and that he successfully dealt with them. Brent Scowcroft, Bush's national security advisor, also narrates parts of the tape, explaining his big-picture take on events that Bush relates on a more personal level. Other parts of A World Transformed, those involving neither author's point of view, are read by Condoleeza Rice, former special assistant to the president for the Soviet Union. (Running time: three hours, two cassettes) --Lou Schuler

From Library Journal

The former president and his national security adviser offer a behind-the-scenes look at his administration.
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.
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Product Details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: Random House Audio; Abridged edition (September 14, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679451552
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679451556
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 4.5 x 7.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,787,139 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Wayne A. Smith VINE VOICE on October 22, 1999
Format: Paperback
George Bush and Brent Scowcroft have written a great book about a fascinating subject. This is very engaging and at times is very much a page turner. I was left thinking that a more detailed account of history being made by the movers themselves may not exist. The end of the Cold War is a great story in and of itself, but also a story that could have had a very different ending were it not for the team that managed to bring it to a successful close.
This is a very honest book by honest men. Evenly though successful on all of the big issues, they write of miscues, uncertainty and difficulties in reaching the "right" decision. It is not a self-praise tome, but a book that is not afraid to lay out an accurate rendering of the facts and atmosphere. The reader has enough information and background to put himself in the role of President and ask, "What would I have done in that siguation." It's the mark of a thorough book.
One can not help but come away impressed by the Bush foreign policy apparatus and the President's own grasp of events, the players and the vital interests of the United States. He, aided by one of the best foreign policy / national security teams ever assembled, played America's hand superbly.
After reading this book, anyone who still believes that any President's main responsibility is "the economy, stupid" is.....well, stupid.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm no expert on the end of the Cold War, nor on the many issues Bush and Scowcroft discuss. There are too many people who argue that the end of the Cold War had everything or nothing to do with Ronald Reagan. As Bush and Scowcroft make plain, intentionally or not, change was coming around too quickly for anyone to claim credit. I know the standard story-line: Reagan raised defense spending and this drove the Soviets to spend until they collapsed. It's a simple story, but it leaves out far too much to be accurate. Bush was on the tail end of a decades-long strategy of containment; thankfully all presidents stood their ground in confronting the Soviets. Perhaps we should all recognize how fortunate we were to have Bush and Scowcroft in leadership positions for the four years they served as President and National Security Adviser. Admittedly cautious, they used their time wisely in dealing with the Soviet Union.

Very thorough in dealing with German reunification and in standing up to Saddam. It's amazing to read the Gulf War stuff: Bush and Scowcroft discuss the importance of alliances, the UN Security Council, containment, and the difficulties of urban warfare. Apparently someone's son did not read the book. Are we better off or worse off for that? Time will tell.

In a sense the book is not co-written because the two authors go back and forth in describing their different memories of the four Bush White House years. An original approach.

Unfortunately, no discussion on the U.S. invasion of Panama.
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Format: Hardcover
This book is the step by step discussion of the major foreign affaire issues that took place during first Bush presidency. To say this book is detailed would be to say the Battan Death March was a "tough hike". The book covers the years 1989 to 1991, more specifically (only) the massacre at Tiananmen Square, the fall of the Berlin Wall, the collapse of the USSR, and the Gulf War. The book is written in an interesting way - Bush and Scowcroft give their views on each of the issues and then combine for a third voice that gives more of a back ground commentary. We also get some of Bush's "dear diary" entries, which given he wrote the book, I wonder if we saw the original entries. This style does make the book more readable, although Scowcroft's writing could compete in excitement with watching grass grow.
Bush does come across as an excellent statesman in dealing with world leaders. He presents a warm down home type of President that worked with some of the leaders he dealt with. The reader also gets an interesting insight into some of the leaders that Bush dealt with (Hussain, Gorbachev and Kohl) to name a few. In the details of the Gulf War, he also comes off as being a skillful negotiator that kept the war effort together. I think it also shows that to be a good world leader you must develop personal relationships with other world leaders. Bush comes off as such a good foreign policy man that it almost adds to the impression that he had no clue what was going on at home.
Again, the book was full of details - - too much dry detail at times. Some of the talk about how minor issues were resolved could have been left on the cutting room floor and the book would have been the better for it. I did feel that we were short-changed on the Tiananmen Square uprising in China.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Authors George H. W. Bush and Brent Scowcroft were both actors and observers in the grand sweep of world change during the Reagan and Bush Administrations. Bush was the U.S. Vice President, and then President during this time. Scowcroft was his close advisor and often the sole notetaker during "one-on-one" meetings with foreign leaders. This book is their account of world events as "Eastern Europe threw off Soviet domination, Germany united, and the Soviet Union dissolved, all without significant bloodshed."

One recurring theme is importance of personal relationships between the President and leaders of other nations. "There are actually commonsense reasons for an American president to build relationships with his opposites. If a foreign leader knows the character and the heartbeat of the president (and vice versa), there is apt to be far less miscalculation on either side. Personal relationships may not overcome tough issues dividing two sides, but they can provide enough goodwill to avoid some misunderstandings. This knowledge helps a president formulate and adjust policies that can bring other leaders along to his own point of view. It can make the difference between suspicion and giving each other the benefit of the doubt--and room to maneuver on a difficult political issue." These relationships help leaders sense when one of them is speaking candidly and when something is being said out of political necessity.

Bush was coached in managing these relationships by other leaders. "[Egypt's Hosni] Mubarak had offered me some advice: touch base with these small countries whenever you can, just to acknowledge their importance to the United States, and it will make a difference with them. I had, and my wise friend Hosni had been absolutely right.
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