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The World's Classics: The Mill on the Floss (Oxford World's Classics) by [Eliot, George, Gordon S. Haight, Dinah Birch]
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The World's Classics: The Mill on the Floss (Oxford World's Classics) Kindle Edition

4.2 out of 5 stars 129 customer reviews

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Length: 564 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Editorial Reviews

Review

Novel by George Eliot, published in three volumes in 1860. It sympathetically portrays the vain efforts of Maggie Tulliver to adapt to her provincial world. The tragedy of her plight is underlined by the actions of her brother Tom, whose sense of family honor leads him to forbid her to associate with the one friend who appreciates her intelligence and imagination. When she is caught in a compromising situation, Tom renounces her altogether, but brother and sister are finally reconciled in the end as they try in vain to survive a climactic flood. -- The Merriam-Webster Encyclopedia of Literature

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Product Details

  • File Size: 2023 KB
  • Print Length: 564 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford (September 5, 1996)
  • Publication Date: September 5, 1996
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003UES2A8
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,347,126 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Top Customer Reviews

By Jana L.Perskie HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 7, 2005
Format: Paperback
Powerful and moving, "The Mill on the Floss" is considered to be George Eliot's most autobiographical novel. Along with "Middlemarch" it is my favorite. Set in early 19th century England - St. Ogg's, Lincolnshire to be exact - this is the tale of gifted, free-spirited Maggie Tulliver and her selfish, spoiled brother, Tom, who were born and raised at Dorlcote Mill on the River Floss. Eliot's portrayal of sibling relationships is terribly poignant and plays a major part in the novel, as does the longstanding rivalry between two local families - the Tullivers and the Wakems.

From earliest childhood Maggie worships her brother Tom, and longs to win his approval, and that of her parents. However, her fierce intelligence and strong streak of independence bring her into constant conflict with her family. She finds, in literature, the kindness and love she longs for in life. "...everybody in the world seemed so hard and unkind to Maggie: there was no indulgence, no fondness, such as she imagined when she fashioned the world afresh in her own thoughts. In books there were people who were always agreeable or tender, and delighted to do things that made one happy, and who did not show their kindness by finding fault. The world outside the books was not a happy one Maggie felt. If life had no love in it, what else was there for Maggie?" Her nature, complex, passionate, sensuous, noble, intellectualized, and spiritualized, is of great importance to this novel, as is the pathos of her relationship with Tom.

Maggie's early years are brilliantly and unsentimentally portrayed from a child's perspective.
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Format: Paperback
The Mill on the Floss, by George Eliot, stands among the greatest nineteenth century British novels. As engaging and readable as anything by Austen or Dickens, this novel adds a degree of psychological and emotional complexity that few novels, of any period, can match.
The novel seems to have the breath of life in it, so that the characters and circumstances seem true and real, even to the modern reader so far removed from the pastoral life of two hundred years ago.
To those who may feel intimidated by the book, don't be. The writing is accessible to any 21st century literate and the controversies of Victorian-era farm life are far more compelling than they may appear at first blush. Give it a try; you won't be disappointed.
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Format: Paperback
George Eliot's works are varied and wonderful, and although this is not the book that she's most noted for, it is one that she held most dear. It is a "no-holds barred" autobiographical account of her own life. George Eliot's real name was Mary Anne Evans, but she used the pen name of George Eliot because society at that time thought it was not correct for women to be authors, and she wanted her books read on their own merits. In this book we read of Maggie Tulliver who was intelligent, imaginative, idealistic and ambitious like George (Mary Anne) herself. The book goes into the continuous conflict between Maggie and her environment, and the frustrations that she encounters in her search for fulfillment and love. George Eliot bared her soul in this novel, but it also contains her trademark wonderful dialogue and characterizations. I have read all George Eliot's works, and found them all richly and disturbingly illuminating. They certainly do make you think about her and the struggles that she encountered within the moral and religious strictures of her society.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
This was my first (of four, so far) George Eliot novel. It's also my favorite. Unlike Adam Bede or Silas Marner, I found the characters to be interesting and enjoyable. No, it's not a finely-crafted piece of literature like Middlemarch. And it might be a bit on the melodramatic side. But for some odd reason I found the story to be ultimately quite moving.
Other folks who I gave the book to gave it mixed results. No one disliked it, but most found the "brother-sister" element to be a bit corny. And pardon my sexism, but I thought the book would appeal more to women than men (since the main character is a teenage girl). Not so. This book is definitely "not for women only".
I imagine if you have a sentimental streak through your bones you will probably love this book.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
There were certain passages of The Mill on the Floss, Proust once told a friend, that never failed to move him to tears. No wonder: In its exact and evocative attention to detail, vivid characterizations and profound understanding of human thought and motive, The Mill on the Floss had an obvious and startling influence on A' La Recherche du Temps Perdu. The Mill on the Floss is melodramatic, sure, but melodrama was the bread and butter of Victorian English novelists; compared with David Copperfield, for example, The Mill on the Floss is a model of restraint. George Eliot creates here an indelible portrait of St. Ogg's, an English provincial town whose residents lead lives "irradiated by no sublime principles, no romantic visions, no active, self-renouncing faith." In particular, she creates Maggie Tulliver, one of the most memorable characters in all literature, whose quest for sublime principles and romantic visions puts her into direct conflict with her neighbors and with Tom, her stubborn, unimaginative brother. The book's tragic ending is superbly haunting, and has helped to make it a deserved favorite of readers for nearly 150 years.
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