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Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Off-library item, unabridged audio book. All 7 CDs and case are in very good condition. There are some normal library stickers and stamps on case and CDs. Ship in 1-2 business days with tracking.
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Worst Fears Audio CD – Unabridged, 1996

3.9 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Recorded Books; worst fears edition (1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0788737155
  • ISBN-13: 978-0788737152
  • Product Dimensions: 6.7 x 6.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,276,843 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Jane D. Anderson on June 18, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
What if the husband you love drops dead and you discover, inch by inch, he left a mystery life behind? Your worst fears would become realities. This is the dilemma of the widow in "Worst Fears." At first she mourns her husband. Then she refuses to attend his funeral. She didn't know the person being buried. It's a good read. No untruth is left unturned.
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Format: Paperback
Throughout the book I felt little sympathy for Alexandra, the insipid, self-centred, child neglecting, actress whose shallow experience was deepened by the sudden death of her husband and the subsequent revelations that recast her whole married life. Weldon deliberately undermines our sympathy for Alexandra by emphasising her acquiescence in the face of every other character. Her thoughts are peppered with compulsive cash valuations of everything she looks at. I felt schadenfreude when her husband's voice delivered the final confirmation of the lie that she had been living through his betrayal and her vanity. Weldon's conclusion is a damp squib which sees Alexandra sailing into the future looking forward to doing it all again.
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Format: Paperback
Fay Weldon's novel Worst Fears starts and finishes with bereavement. It examines how a woman deals with simultaneous loss and revealed betrayal. Alexandra is an actress, if I might be excused such gender specificity. She is also quite successful. She is currently appearing in a London West End production of Ibsen's A Doll's House. She is therefore away from home a lot.

Her husband Ned has just died, apparently discovered on the floor of the family home by a visitor. It was a sudden and massive heart attack. Alexandra wonders what might have brought it on. She takes time off work, thus allowing an understudy temporarily to take her role. She returns to the rickety, old, antique-stuffed cottage in the country. It is perhaps a rural idyll that now has to be rewritten.

Her worst fears are that there is more than meets the eye. She also has some hopes, but from the start it seems unlikely they will be realised. She is greeted by the dog, Diamond, who seems to know something is wrong. She contacts local acquaintances, Lucy and Abbie, whom she suspects know more than they are saying. Hamish, her husband's brother, comes to stay to help sort things out. Sascha, Alexandra and Ned's little boy is with Irene, Alexandra's mother. It happens often when Alexandra is away at work. Her husband Ned, as usual needed space at home to concentrate. He was, by the way, was an authority on theatre, a critic, an expert on Ibsen and also interested in costume design.

As Alexandra delves into recent events, she discovers a tangle of interests, relationships and liaisons. All of them have implications for her, despite the fact that she was often not directly involved. The protagonists relate directly to one another. They socialise, if that might be the right word. They interact. They act.
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Format: Print on Demand (Paperback)
This is absorbing reading; a high quality story, told well, but I expect no less from Fay Weldon.

What really annoyed me was the formatting - random blank lines, inconsistent with the paragraphing, and no first line indent. It was visually displeasing, distracting when reading, slightly confusing at times. It is a totally unnecessary gimmick and the publishing team should be ashamed of themselves.
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Format: Paperback
I do think Fay Weldon is a very good writer, and will probably read other books of hers.

But, this particular story was a disappointment. It should have been about an eighth as long as it was. And, it just didn't make any sense. Alexandra was endlessly in denial, and pathetically obliging when it came to allowing people to step all over her. The attacks seemed very unrealistic, and mind-numbingly repetitive.

And the fact that she, Alexandra, kept being referred to as she, Alexandra, yes, she, Alexandra, I'm talking about her, Alexandra. Arrrrg! What was that all about?
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Format: Paperback
The brilliant Fay Weldon skewers and punctures hypocrisy is this wonderfully sly first-person narrative. Protagonist Alexandra Ludd is the only real, genuine, honest human being in this disturbing but ultimately triumphant (in a way!) tale of adultery/infidelity, backbiting, lies, and false friendship. Alexandra, a beauty and successful actress, is in a sham of a marriage, but she's the only one who doesn't seem to know it. Her late husband Ned, a failed theater critic consumed by jealousy of her success -- she makes the money, he spends it -- porked all available females in the environs of their country cottage to get even with her for the failures of his professional career. He lived a devious double life and was unfaithful to her in nasty and sundry ways much worse than mere physical infidelity. Additionally, he maligned her character and twisted the reasons for her behavior. Alexandra is a great character, and I was rooting for her all the way, even when it seemed that all had fallen apart like Humpty Dumpty, never to be put together again. It's a terrible aspect of human nature, but success/beauty/talent are resented by those who lack any of these three attributes; Weldon exposes it for what it is, from the obsequious pseudo-friends to the horny brother-in-law Hamish, who, feigning assistance to the grieving widow, is just itching for the opportunity to get into her pants; to the country folks' envy -- there is a wonderful cameo of a resentful child-minder, the servant of everyone's nightmares -- of the city folks, who seem to have too much and they too little. It's a witty page turner typical of Weldon's best work.Read more ›
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