Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

  • List Price: $26.99
  • Save: $6.10 (23%)
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Worthy Brown's Daughter has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: exlibrary hardcover book in jacket with light wear, shows some light reader wear throughout ,all the usual library marks and stamps.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Worthy Brown's Daughter Hardcover – January 21, 2014

4.2 out of 5 stars 164 customer reviews

See all 11 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$20.89
$3.24 $0.01

Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for the Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
$20.89 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Worthy Brown's Daughter
  • +
  • Woman with a Gun: A Novel
  • +
  • Violent Crimes: An Amanda Jaffe Novel (Amanda Jaffe Series)
Total price: $57.59
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Based loosely on true events, the latest legal thriller from criminal defense attorney turned bestseller Margolin (Lost Lake) follows Matthew Penny, a pistol-bearing lawyer guided by his own moral compass. Portland, Ore., in the 1860s is a nest of conflict: property lawsuits stall the inevitable construction of a railroad, and a black man on trial expects a racist jury. Here, the innocent is Worthy Brown, a freed black man who asks Matthew to rescue his daughter, Roxanne, from Caleb Barbour, a crooked lawyer who illegally holds her in servitude. When Worthy is discovered standing over Caleb's dead body, and only he and Matthew know the truth, justice seems unlikely. Around this central drama, Margolin establishes characters that might have stepped out of a grainy Western, among them the evil siren Sharon Hill—a full-figured woman whose oval face was framed by ebony ringlets that were in sharp contrast to her milk-white complexion. Margolin allows passions to sway his heroes, and generates empathy toward his crooks. If only the black characters worshipped their white benefactors less, or if one female character was spared a derogatory physical description. The plot is at times frustratingly one-dimensional, but Matthew is ultimately forced to distinguish truth from justice. On the courtroom floor, where Margolin is clearly at home, the stock characters adopt roles, albeit briefly, in a satisfying, white-knuckle climax. (Feb.)

From Booklist

Margolin, author of 17 popular legal thrillers, pens a historical novel set in 1850s Portland, Oregon, based on an actual legal suit brought by a black family against a white slave owner. Free man Worthy Brown sues his former master for his daughter’s freedom. Out of sheer spite and wicked lust, Caleb Barbour refuses to release 15-year-old Roxanne to her father, despite Oregon’s law against slavery. Worthy hires down-on-his-luck lawyer Matthew Penny to bring a legal custody suit, though circumstances conspire against them. Throw in a money-grubbing beauty, a smitten judge, a few loudmouth hotheads, and at least two legal beagles willing to bend the law, and the Old West comes alive in heart-wrenching, violent, and wicked racist color. The plot is comfortably predictable, with a last-minute save by our brilliant hero, yet legal thriller and western fans will stay with it to the last page. Both a psychological western reminiscent of The Ox-Bow Incident and a sharp critique of Oregon’s early legal process, Margolin’s novel offers a compelling portrait of small town justice done right—eventually. --Jen Baker
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Harper; First Edition edition (January 21, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0062195344
  • ISBN-13: 978-0062195340
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.1 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (164 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #188,201 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Aaron C. Brown TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 28, 2013
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Let's start off with two easy points. If you're a Philip Margolin fan, and I know there are many, this book delivers the goods. It's not up there with his best early work, like Gone, But Not Forgotten and After Dark, but it's got more freshness and energy than most of his stuff from the last five years.

On the other hand, if you want a historical novel, you can give this one a miss without second thoughts. The characters and situations are thoroughly modern, without even a half-hearted attempt to embed them in 1860 Oregon. The few bits of research are paraded obviously ("there were no courthouses in Oregon in 1860","the population of San Francisco in 1860 was 56,802") and anachronisms abound. The period is an uneasy conglomeration of the somewhat earlier Illinois circuit court environment of Young Mr. Lincoln with the later brawling frontier world shown in Deadwood, or perhaps the Western justice illustrated in Have Gun Will Travel. On top of that, this is a legal thriller, not a novel. There is no character development or realistic dialog. Every expression and emotion is laboriously explained to the reader. There is no sense of place or atmosphere, descriptions are superficial and clichéd.
Read more ›
4 Comments 31 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Phillip Margolin is one of those special authors who, when a reader picks up their book, they know they are in for an entertaining experience.

I was sent this book from Amazon vine, in return for my review and I couldn't be happier that I picked this book.

The time is 1860 and Oregon is really beginning to grow. Matthew Penny and his wife decide to move west from Ohio and travel by wagon train. However, Matthew losses his wife when a wagon is swept down a river crossing.

With this burden behind him, he moves to Phoenix, Oregon where he's appointed to defend a man accused of theft. He doesn't win the case but does a fine job with the man's defense. Later, another man approaches him and tells him that this man has information that Matthew can use to win another case he was preparing for. All this man wants is the promise from Matthew that if the information helps, Matthew would promise to return the favor. (For just a bit, it seems like the devil in Damn Yankees).

Matthew wins the new case and what the man wants is Matthew's help in getting his daughter who is being kept as a slave by a wealthy but unscrupulous man.

It's difficult not to give away plot but the story moves along swiftly. The characters are vividly drawn as is the setting of the early days of Portland, Oregon. We see such things as the first steam locomotive in that part of the country.

This is one of the best books I've read this year. My heart was beating faster and faster as I approached the conclusion that was both appropriate and satisfying.
4 Comments 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book was a very pleasant surprise. I always enjoy Mr. Margolin's books, but this one was especially touching. It was set in the 1860s, and it provided a very interesting and informative look at the practice of law when the western states were new. It also gave insight into some of the cultural and societal issues of the times. Excellent character development. Well worth reading.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
New York Times best-selling author Phillip Margolin is at his best in this new 2014 murder and court thriller, which contains four plots. The primary plot is based, as Margolin explains, on an actual case where a slave owner brought a family of slaves from a slave state to Oregon in the early 1800s, a state where any slave brought to the land became free. The slave owner allowed the parents and a child to leave, but kept several children as indentured servants. The parents were forced to go to court to save their children. In this novel, there is a father and daughter, Worthy and Roxanne, who face this problem just at the time when Abraham Lincoln is elected president of the United States and the country is about to become embroiled in a civil war over slavery. It is one year after Oregon became a state.

The second plot focuses on a young lawyer, Matthew Perry, who falls in love with the daughter of an extremely rich man and she with him. His wife had recently died and while he is in love with the young woman, he is still in love with his first wife and is still grieving. He represents Worthy in trying to free his daughter from the former slave owner Caleb Barbour.

Complicating the prior events is the murder of Barbour with Worthy being charged with the crime. Matthew Perry knows that Worthy did not commit the murder and who actually did so, but is unable to disclose this because of several obstacles he is unable to overcome.

While these events transpire, an attractive former prostitute decides to fake a marriage to the very wealthy man and kill him so she can inherit his fortune.

The four plots are filled with noteworthy events that occurred during the pre-civil war era out west and a host of fascinating characters.
Read more ›
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Worthy Brown's Daughter
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Worthy Brown's Daughter

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?