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Showing 1-10 of 10 reviews(Verified Purchases). See all 14 reviews
on April 27, 2013
Warren is the expect on X-ray diffraction, no doubt about it. However, this book is not intended for neophytes or people who are new to the field of x-ray diffraction. He immediately jumps into the Ewald Sphere for deriving scattering, and works with a lot of vector calculus, so if you're not familiar with XRD most of this book will go over your head. He does a good job of describing how different deviations from Bragg's law - such as a sample displacement, finite particle size, and crystal strain - play a role in changing the diffraction pattern and how the different two-theta dependence, such as the sine dependence on stress, come about. But again, you'll be working with a lot of vector calculus to get there. If you have a good understanding of XRD and want to learn the math and physics behind the technique, this book is a good supplement for your understanding. It would be a good choice for graduate students or people with PhDs.
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on January 3, 2007
This book is a valuable reference for its discussions of imperfect crystals, including peak broadening from nanocrystals; temperature vibration effects that might factor into in-situ XRD; and especially the discussion on order-disorder. Even its discussion of Fourier methods (pre-PC) and diffraction theory are useful. At less than $20, anyone routinely using XRD to analyze inorganic samples should buy this book. After losing my old copy, I felt compelled to immediately buy a new copy.

This book functions poorly as an introductory text to diffraction or crystallography and is out-dated with respect to discussing instrumentation. This book is of limited use regarding soft-matter samples.
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on November 13, 2011
Even if a little old, covers all the basics in an excellent manner. The math, while sometimes involved is not that complex and is very educational. The plus side of it being several decades old is that everything is presented in a rather fundamental and easy to grasp way. One does need to spend a little time going through the equations, but it definitely makes understanding the matter easier.
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on July 25, 2016
There are some typos.
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on August 21, 2009
Filled with value at a bargain price, Warren's fundamental work continues to impress for its elegance and the advances that it brought forth. Still not as used as it should be for nano-crystalline metals and ceramics for example.
For experienced and willing to understand advanced-diffractionists.
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on April 15, 2015
Very classic XRD book. The book condition is good.
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on January 6, 2013
This book must be on your shelf if you are interested x ray diffraction. got this book for a class but i kept it because it was so helpful
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on November 6, 2014
Good book!
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on December 11, 2007
I love math, and this book is full of math. Initially, Warren's book would have plenty of sex appeal for someone like me, slightly frustrated with the lack of mathematical rigour in Cullity's book.

Was I ever wrong.

In derivations, I feel there are many important small details missing. A variable is introduced without it ever appearing in a diagram, there are dubious reasons for various substitutions and cancellations, etc.

The breaking point was my stray into Warren's book at the beginning of Chapter 13. Hapless little ol' me wanted to see the Scherrer equation for particle size derived from first principles. On the second page of the derivation, a vector s[0]' is introduced...without it ever being (explicitly?) included in the diagram. Furious, I minimized my Word document, pounded Amazon's URL out on the keyboard....

...which brings me to now. If this book had mathematical soundness, I'd be the king of X-ray diffraction. I really, REALLY want to like this book. Either Warren had already visualized how it made sense in his mind and forgot to write it down, or didn't bother to make it more straightforward. Which means he's either a freaking genius or monstrously inconsiderate.
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on October 13, 2013
If you work with xray diffraction, you will need to keep this book handy for reference. I go to it all the time.
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