Qty:1
& FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
In Stock.
Sold by Outlet Promotions and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
X - The Man With The X-Ra... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by BREAD OF LOVE
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: light wear on case, no insert
Trade in your item
Get up to a $0.63
Gift Card.
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Cart
$19.95
& FREE Shipping on eligible orders. Details
Sold by: Badlands DVD
Add to Cart
$19.95
& FREE Shipping on eligible orders. Details
Sold by: coach_blanks merchandise
Add to Cart
$19.98
& FREE Shipping on eligible orders. Details
Sold by: Serenity-Now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

X - The Man With The X-Ray Eyes

4.0 out of 5 stars 226 customer reviews

Additional DVD options Edition Discs
Price
New from Used from
DVD
(Jun 05, 2001)
"Please retry"
1
$11.88
$5.99 $0.75
Watch Instantly with Rent Buy

Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime
Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime Start your 30-day free trial to stream thousands of movies & TV shows included with Prime. Start your free trial
$11.88 & FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details In Stock. Sold by Outlet Promotions and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • X - The Man With The X-Ray Eyes
  • +
  • Wild In The Streets
Total price: $25.86
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

"Only the gods see everything," cautions one scientist as Dr. James Xavier (Ray Milland) experiments with a formula that will allow the human eye to see beyond the wavelength of visible light. "I am closing in on the gods," he responds with the hubris that is doomed to destroy his overreaching ambition. A mix of Greek tragedy and sci-fi potboiler, Roger Corman's X: The Man with the X-Ray Eyes (simply identified as X in the eerie, odd opening credits) is a familiar tale of a scientist who risks everything to explore the unknown and is finally driven mad by, literally, seeing too much. Peeping through the clothes of comely women is all good adolescent fun until the gift becomes a nightmare as his sight rages out of control. The possibilities suggested in the hints of addiction and inconsistent bouts of megalomania remain tantalizingly unexplored in the unfocused script, and Corman's cut-rate special effects are often more hokey than haunting (the "city dissolved in an acid of light" that Xavier poetically describes becomes fuzzy photography through a series of color filters). Don Rickles offers a venal turn as a scheming carnival barker turned blackmailing con man, and Diana Van der Vlis is understanding as a sympathetic scientist who tries to rescue Xavier from his spiral into tortured madness, but in the tradition of Greek tragedy, he is doomed to be destroyed by the very gifts he desires.

MGM's widescreen disc also features commentary by director-producer Corman. --Sean Axmaker


Special Features

  • Original theatrical prologue

Product Details

  • Actors: Ray Milland, Diana Van der Vlis, Harold J. Stone, John Hoyt, Don Rickles
  • Directors: Roger Corman
  • Format: Anamorphic, Closed-captioned, Color, NTSC, Subtitled, Widescreen
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono)
  • Subtitles: Spanish, French
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated:
    NR
    Not Rated
  • Studio: MGM (Video & DVD)
  • DVD Release Date: June 5, 2001
  • Run Time: 79 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (226 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00005AUK1
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #64,786 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "X - The Man With The X-Ray Eyes" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Robert Amsel on January 30, 2005
During the 1960s, American International primarily introduced low-budgeted movies geared usually for drive-ins. By some mistake, "Wild in the Streets" turned out to be both a hit and a perennial cult favorite. Deservedly so. It is probably one of the most subversive satires ever produced for the American screen. In September of 2004, it was finally released as part of a double-sided MGM Midnight Movies selection on DVD. (The flip side is one of Roger Corman's worst movies, GAS-S-S-S-S, a sophomoric comedy doubtless inspired by "Wild in the Street"'s success. Skip it.)

What is particularly strange is that "Wild in the Streets" appears to have been unreleased as soon as it was released. If you check MGM's website, you will not find it listed in MGM's inventory. Nor will you find it listed as available on Amazon or most places. In fact, the only retail place online you can find it is at BestBuy. However, it does not appear to be available at most of BestBuy's actual stores. Did the idea of a fascistic dictatorship taking over America somehow offend the current Administration or offend executives at MGM? Just a question since I'm not privy to why it's being censored.

At any rate, I would suggest that the movie's admirers buy the DVD when or where they can, since they might not have a second chance. The movie itself was released in 1968 while the Vietnam War raged on -- and on and on and on. This is important to understanding the film in its historical context. "Wild in the Streets" has several premises. The first is that the old fogies in Washington are destroying the country. Although Vietnam is not mentioned (read Iraq, if you want to bring the premise up to date), the draft certainly is on the moviemakers's minds.
Read more ›
6 Comments 56 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Ever conscious of cashing in on whatever trend might have been fashionable at the time, American International Pictures (AIP) focused their sights on the ever-growing youth movement of the mid to late 60s with this frightening (if you were over 60) tale of youthful revolution in Wild in the Streets (1968). Directed by Barry Shear, whose primary credits include TV shows like "The Man from U.N.C.L.E.", "Ironside", and "Hawaii Five-O", to name a few, the film stars Christopher Jones (The Looking Glass War), an actor once thought by many to be perhaps the next James Dean or Marlon Brando, but whose fortunes and star potential faded due to, what some speculate, the strain of having to live up to the expectations beyond his grasp...oh yeah, that and the all the drugs, as highlighted in `Christopher Jones: The E! True Hollywood Story'...also appearing is Oscar winner Shelley Winters (The Diary of Anne Frank, The Night of the Hunter, Lolita), Diane Varsi (I Never Promised You a Rose Garden), Hal Holbrook (Creepshow), Millie Perkins (The Diary of Anne Frank), Ed Begley (12 Angry Men), Bert Freed (Nevada Smith), and Richard Pryor (Silver Streak, Stir Crazy).

As the story begins, we witness an intelligent and precocious boy named Max Flatow (played by Barry Williams, better know as the character Greg Brady, from The Brady Bunch), Jr. grow into a disillusioned young adult who decides to leave home, severing his family ties, and make it own his own (given his mother, played by Winters, I didn't blame him). By the age of 22 we learn he's not only changed his name to Max Frost, but that he's also become a famous recording star, and with the help of his entourage (none over the age of 25), become the head of a multi-million dollar empire.
Read more ›
Comment 69 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
In X - The Man with the X-Ray Eyes (1963) Dr. James Xavier, played by Ray Milland, desires the ability to `access the entire wavelength spectrum' so that he may see what no one else can...what male hasn't had that dream? Seriously, if you ever read a comic book, there was always an advertisement, usually between ads for Wildroot hair tonic, how to become a muscle man, or an offer for real Texas rattlesnake eggs, that touted `X-Ray Glasses' featuring a crudely drawn illustration of a guy wearing said glasses and not only having the ability to see the bones in his hand, but also being able to see through a woman's clothes...and I bet a great deal of them were sold, not because they actually worked (most of us, on some level, knew they wouldn't), but on the very slight possibility that they might. Produced and directed by Roger Corman (Pit and the Pendulum, The Masque of the Red Death), the film stars Oscar winner Ray Milland (The Lost Weekend, The Big Clock). Also appearing is Diana Van der Vlis (The Girl in Black Stockings), Harold Stone (Spartacus), John Hoyt (Attack of the Puppet People), and Don `Mr. Warmth' Rickles (Beach Blanket Bingo, Kelly's Heroes).

As I already mentioned, Milland plays Dr. James Xavier, a man with an obsession. You see, as humans, we only see about ten percent of what's actually out there, and he wants more (greedy bastich). During his research he develops the X formula, which in experiments allows a monkey to see through cardboard, but has a curious side effect of death...Xavier chalks this up to the monkeys minuscule brain not being able to comprehend what it sees, thus shutting down and causing the demise, but humans are smarter than monkeys, so shouldn't have the same problem, right? Right...
Read more ›
4 Comments 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums



Customers Also Watched on Amazon Video