Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$7.50
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Pages are clean with no markings. Fast shipping from Amazon! Qualifies for Prime Shipping and FREE standard shipping for orders over $35.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 4 images

Yakuza Moon: Memoirs of a Gangster's Daughter Hardcover – July 1, 2007

3.9 out of 5 stars 93 customer reviews

See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$32.31 $1.79

Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Tendo, the daughter of a yakuza (mob) boss, grew up in 1970s and '80s Japan, living through the booms and busts of life on the wrong side of the law. Her first published work, Shoko uses unpracticed but appropriately blunt prose to memoir her exceedingly arduous life; readers will appreciate her restrained but powerful details, especially during some of the harsher scenes. From age 12 onwards, Shoko's life was enveloped in drug addiction, poverty, psychological and sexual abuse, miscarriage, attempted suicide and the deaths of many close family members, set against a backdrop of Japan's ultra-secretive yakuza society. Admiration and a detached style keep Tendo from exploring any resentment she might harbor toward her criminal father, which may prove off-putting for some, but feels entirely honest given the emotional trauma Tendo suffers, and is as revealing for what it includes as for what it doesn't. Emotionally complex and thoroughly heart-rending, this book is recommended for anyone searching for a more thorough and personal understanding of Japanese society, and its darker corners, than is offered by more popular Japanese imports (movies, comic books) featuring similar subject matter.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review


" ...A fast read... And her best-selling book has been reprinted 11 times in Japan. Maybe its because it tells it how it is, and its hardly a romantic portrait of the gangster life."--Giant Robot


"...Deserves an enormous amount of credit for her willingness to love and accept her family - and herself - regardless of their flaws."--Bust


"Powerful" Bloomberg News Service


"... Shining a light into a dark and little understood corner of modern Japan." --The Guardian (U.K.)


"Emotionally complex and thoroughly heart-rending, this book is recommended for anyone searching for a more thorough and personal understanding of Japanese society."--Publishers Weekly.com


"Yakuza Moon is a very personal book about a young woman's struggle to survive in a hostile and brutal environment, and it gives a rare insight into 'life in the other side' in Japan."--Asia Times Online


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 187 pages
  • Publisher: Kodansha USA; First Edition edition (July 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 4770030428
  • ISBN-13: 978-4770030429
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 0.8 x 6.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (93 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #626,645 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A great read, was hard to put down once I got started. Not at all the type of life you would expect from a family that was once very powerful.

Her child hood bullying, drug use during her teen years, and horrible relationships with men in the past serve as a warning that just because a life style may appear to be glamorous does not mean that it is.

Told with shocking truth, Shoko Tendo's memoir is a great read.
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
My father used to go to Japan on business all the time in the 1980's. He marvelled at how little crime there was compared to New York. But no country is truly crime-free. Even in Japan, there were troubled kids who got in trouble with the police. This book is about that; what happens to Japanese kids from dysfunctional families.

Yakuza Moon opened my eyes to a whole lot of things I never knew about Japan. The Yakuza aren't folk heroes the way the Italian Mafia are in their neighborhoods. Everyone, including neighbors, teachers, and classmates, despised her father. She's a pariah in her neighborhood, beaten by her father at home, and when her father loses the house (and his standing in the criminal underworld) there's nowhere for her to go. She can't go to school, and has no choice but to work in sleazy bars.

The ending is a happy one, fortunately. She does have a career, has a child, tattoos herself (as a way of gaining control of her body) and makes her peace with life. Despite having no education, she does a pretty good job writing this book.
1 Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This was supposed to be a weekend business trip filler. It ended up just a 4 hour plane ride and a few more hours in the hotel. I gave it 4 stars though becasue I couldn't put the book down. But I am a voyeur and this book really delivers on the exhibitionism. This is really just a Jerry Springer story with a happy ending. However, I am a Japanophile, so this book held my interest more than the same story about a girl from say, Hamilton, Ohio would have. I met several girls like the author while living in Japan and I can say the story does ring very true. This is a great, fast read if you are into Japanese culture, otherwise you may find it a bit maudlin.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I absolutely love this book! As a lover of Japanese culture, especially the 'forbidden world,' this book provided insight of what a life was like for a gangster's family. This book isn't about what a life is like for a yakuza... a lot of people mistake that. This is about a woman's life as a yakuza's daughter (as the title states), which was just as interesting to me. You can tell how much the yakuza lifestyle has affected Shoko's family and her own lifestyle. You can see how much her father's lifestyle haunted her in various ways. It's crazy how our families can cause create our path in life - at first, that is. Then you can see how Shoko overcomes her obstacles and created her own path.

The way this was written was very straight-forward and raw. It was incredibly refreshing. Actually, I'm going to read this book again today!
1 Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
Interesting story told with humility and earnestness, but prose is very workmanlike and matter of fact. This lends the book a charming understated tone despite the intensity of the author's memories, but ultimately leaves it to fall a little flat.

The story's unique female insider perspective is compelling, and I'd quickly recommend it for fans of the genre, but perhaps after only reading some of its stand out titles like Yakuza Diary, Tokyo Vice or Confessions of a Yakuza first.

Unpretentious and endearing, but not a classic.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
2.5

I think something, literally, got lost in translation. I think the disconnect was just a matter of it being translated from Japanese to English, and perhaps Japanese culture.

The writing was at times hard to follow and sometimes down right didnt make sense. For instance, at one point, she says her father was nice, then a few pages later she tells us how he abused and mistreated her.

There were also several times where she didnt give enough information, thereby making the story quite confusing. One particular time, she talked about having a miscarriage but went on to abort. That doesnt make sense. If you are miscarrying, you dont need an abortion.

The book was interesting, it just left a lot out. At one point she mentioned how close she was to her mom and how close her sister was to her dad. At no point in the story was that ever fleshed out. It came as a complete surprise.

There were giant gaps, like the eight ish months she spent in the school for wayward girls. What happened there?

Also, why did a <spoiler> giant tattoo </spoiler> change her life?

What about the hostess jobs?

I could go on but I'll end with saying it was hard to keep up and follow along with.

I appreciate her sharing her story with us. And I'm glad to see she got her life together.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It's like reading the journal of a precocious, difficult teenager, with a bit of sensational Yakuza culture thrown in. It could easily go cheesy, but author is a sweet girl so I never felt she was a lost cause. It's definitely sensational, lots of sex and drugs. It was a great read on a plane flight, quick and entertaining. It's like reading People magazine, I don't really remember what I read but it entertained me in the interim.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews