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Yamaha Dx7 Digital Synthesizer

5.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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  • Polyphony - 16 Voices, Oscillators - 16 bit Digital 6 operator FM.
  • #Instruments - (1) Monotimbral, LFO - Sine/Square/Tri/SAW up/SAW Down/Random
  • VCA - 6 Envelope generators 8 parameters each, Keyboard - 61 keys (w/ velocity and aftertouch)
  • Memory - 32 Patches, Control - MIDI
  • Date Produced - 1983-87

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Product Description

One of the most popular digital synths ever was the DX7 from Yamaha, released in 1983. It featured a whole new type of synthesis called FM (Frequency Modulation). It certainly is not analog and it is difficult to program but can result in some excellent sounds! It is difficult because it is non-analog and thus, a whole new set of parameters are available for tweaking, many of which seemed counter-intuitive and unfamiliar. And programming had to be accomplished via membrane buttons, one data slider and a small LCD screen. Still the sounds it shipped with and that many users did manage to create were more complex and unique than anything before it. Percussive and metallic but thick as analog at times, the DX7 was known for generating unique sounds still popular to this day. The DX7 was also a truly affordable programmable synth when it was first released. Almost every keyboardist bought one at the time making the DX7 one of the best selling synths of all time! It also came with MIDI which was brand new at the time - Sequential had already released the first MIDI synth, the Prophet 600. Roland had just released the JX-3P with very basic MIDI implementation, and wouldn't get around to adding full MIDI for another year with the Juno-106, and it would be three years before Roland can counter the popularity of the DX7 with a digital synth of their own, the D-50.

Product Information

Item Weight 32 pounds
Product Dimensions 11.8 x 8.9 x 0.1 inches
Shipping Weight 8.8 ounces
ASIN 071190653X
Item model number DX7
Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
Best Sellers Rank #127,219 in Musical Instruments (See Top 100 in Musical Instruments)
#260 in Musical Instruments > Keyboards > Electronic Keyboards > Synthesizers & Workstations
Date first available at Amazon.com November 3, 2006

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Back in the day the Fender Rhodes electric piano was THE iconic sound for stage pianos, but then Yamaha comes in with their DX7 and steals the thunder away from Rhodes with its own flavor of electric piano sound. Still the best electric piano sound today. Still want one!
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What does "Hard Habit To Break"(Chicago), "The Finer Things"(Steve Winwood), "One More Night"(Phil Collins), "Another Part Of Me" (Michael Jackson), "People Are People"(Depeche Mode), "Control" (Janet Jackson), and Miami Vice (Jan Hammer) have in common? You guessed it...the Yamaha DX7. Not to mention that the list would be a thousand pages long to mention each song and artists that have used the DX7. It came into existence in 1983 and lived well into the late 80's with a reincarnated DX7 II. If the studios did not have this keyboard at the time you know they were not serious. In my opinion it was the most popular synth in the music industry, and is one of the bes,t or the best selling synths of all time period. This was the age of futurism. Analog synths were becoming passe, and very few people saw the resurrection of the analog. Yamaha DX7 was to blame for the analog pessimism. Digital became the fashion, and still is to this day with software synths. I have played an original DX7, a DX27, and a DX7II-FD for quite few gigs, and can attest the positive and the negative. The negative for is the technology. FM Synthesis. The sounds are not analog, neither sampled. it corners it self. A little screen, plus/minus buttons, and a Data slider are the tools used to program a sound. I have edited and programmed sounds to couple of sounds and it is not user friendly. That is why the 32 preset(Bank A, B) made sense to punch a green membrane and play and leave it as it is. I think that was the huge selling point to this synth. Where before you had to turn LFO Filter knobs to create a sound. The DX& became the father to all keyboards today. Select a Bank, a sound and just play. In that sense the DX7 is user friendly.Read more ›
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excellent
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